Why I love my D200

Started Jul 24, 2013 | Discussions thread
rkumar
Regular MemberPosts: 420
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Reason for blown red channel on D7000
In reply to Stacey_K, Jul 26, 2013

Kodak - differences in spectral distribution of daylight (equal across wavelengths) and tungsten lighting (more red).

http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedFiles/US_plugins_acrobat_en_motion_newsletters_filmEss_03_Nature-of-Light.pdf

"Daylight film is used when the primary source of illumination is skylight, daylight or HMI light, which approximates daylight. Tungsten film is used to capture scenes in which the primary light source is tungsten. Because daylight has a relatively flat spectral curve, which means roughly equal energy at all wavelengths, the red, green, and blue sensitivities of a daylight film are roughly equal. Because tungsten light’s spectral curve shows that much more red energy is emitted than blue light, tungsten film is balanced so that the blue sensitivity is correspondingly higher than the red sensitivity."

D7000 uses the same "film" in sunlight and tungsten lighting. I believe the CFA has been setup (thinner red filter?) so that more light reaches the sensor in low-light conditions (indoor, tungsten, more red light). This improves the low light capability of the D7000 compared to D200. But in bright daylight, it ends up sending too much red light into the photo-sites.

Thom Hogan's comments - he mentions bayer filter changes compared to previous Nikon cameras

http://www.bythom.com/nikond7000review.htm

"Surprisingly, the Red and Blue channel raw responses are a bit different than we're used to in Nikon DSLRs. I was quite surprised when I started putting together my UniWB file for my Complete Guide: something seemed different in the channel responses. Clearly, there are Bayer filtration changes on this camera compared to other Nikon/Sony DSLR/sensor combos. The Red channel is not as good, the Blue channel is better. This is likely one of the reasons why people are commenting about the improved noise (most low light situations are warm light, so the Blue channel is often the first and highest noise producer). But this means also that if you're a raw shooter and you've got ACR/Lightroom/whatever presets that you've dialed in for a D5000/D90/D300, you're going to be redoing them."

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