Moiré disaster on the E-5

Started Jul 10, 2013 | Discussions thread
John Sheehy
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Re: "Disaster" is a bit strong.
In reply to Barry Stewart, Jul 12, 2013

Barry Stewart wrote:

Great Bustard wrote:

I see color moire on the right (his left) of the suit, but it's relatively mild, in my opinion. So, either I'm missing the disaster, or your standards are higher than mine.

GB: No, your photo standards are generally higher than mine, I'd say — but yes, all of you guys and myself are unable to see — via DPR — what I've seen today, straight from my camera card.

Believe me, all of you would be saying "Whoa!" if you could see what I can see on the original JPEGs. It may be my monitor and/or software — but it hasn't shown me that in the last 2.5 years.

I'm still open to suggestions.

Aliasing can happen in the capture, and it can also happen in the display processing.  Any software that resizes an image in such a manner that there isn't equal weighting from all original pixel or pixel fragments in the new pixel's area, will, by necessity, alias the display.  Also, any sharpening at the final pixel level increases aliasing, but it is generally not as bad as capture aliasing.

Try this; create a very large image that is a one-pixel B&W checkerboard, say 4000x4001 pixels, and then use your viewing software to view it at 100%, then reduce its magnification a little at a time and watch the image change.  A "good" resizing method will just reduce the over-all image, and fail to display details beyond the output resolution's capability at all, as opposed to displaying them distorted, fractionally, in the wrong places (snapped to the pixel grid, as there is no sub-pixel detail possible).

If you look at FastStone Image Viewer, it has a "Smooth" checkbox at the bottom, which turns on proper sampling, which would otherwise use a quick-and-dirty method that increases aliasing, and noise.  Unfortunately, many people do not realize how much difference the software can make, and have judged images repeated through a false view, assuming that there is too much noise at a certain ISO, etc.  You don't have to look at 100% pixel view to get a view in which noise is exaggerated; it happens with bad downsizing methods as well.

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