Is lack of Active D-Lighting a significant disadvantage for GR user?

Started Jun 27, 2013 | Discussions thread
ForumParentFirstPreviousNextNext unread
Flat view
Jefftan
Senior MemberPosts: 1,112
Like?
Is lack of Active D-Lighting a significant disadvantage for GR user?
Jun 27, 2013

I think so especially for jpeg user. Quoted form below

"Active D-Lighting is supposed to assess and protect local contrast, so that the image doesn't end up looking too flat or washed-out and, even at the Extra High setting, has done a pretty good job of it."

"The three tone curves used to offer these three settings are increasingly flat - incorporating more highlight and shadow detail but with an overall loss of contrast. This is made more dramatic because the Ricoh takes the unusual step of pushing the shadows until they're brighter than they were with DRC Off."

indeed the "dynamic range compensation" image don't look attractive because of flatness which may not be useful

Coolpix A

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-coolpix-a/9

The Coolpix A's mode for dealing with high contrast scenes is Nikon's now-familiar Active D-Lighting system. This will reduce the exposure of a shot by up to 1EV and use adaptive processing to incorporate the extra tonal information it captures in the highlights, while brightening darker areas of the image.

Because Active D-Lighting changes the camera's exposure, it has to be set at the point of exposure - you can adjust the extent of the processing in Raw conversion, but you can't fully remove the effect of the Active D-Lighting selection you made when the image was first captured.

As usual, we're pretty impressed with the results - the camera has been able to cope with this high dynamic range scene without requiring multiple exposures or giving unnatural-looking output. Active D-Lighting is supposed to assess and protect local contrast, so that the image doesn't end up looking too flat or washed-out and, even at the Extra High setting, has done a pretty good job of it.

For JPEG shooters in particular, this is a really nice feature to have.

GR

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/ricoh-gr/10

The Ricoh offers a Dynamic Range Compensation mode. Engaging it increases the minimum available ISO - a dead give-away that it's reducing the exposure (relative to standard mode), to capture more highlight tones, then pulling the shadows up to give the correct image brightness.

The GR offers three levels of Dynamic Range Compensation, giving 0.7, 1 and 1.7EV extra highlight capture, respectively.

The three tone curves used to offer these three settings are increasingly flat - incorporating more highlight and shadow detail but with an overall loss of contrast. This is made more dramatic because the Ricoh takes the unusual step of pushing the shadows until they're brighter than they were with DRC Off.

This risks exaggerating the increased shadow noise that comes from using darker tones in the Raw file. Thankfully, at the cameras' lowest ISO setting (100/160/200/320 depending on DRC setting) there's plenty of Raw dynamic range to call upon before noise becomes a problem.

ForumParentFirstPreviousNextNext unread
Flat view
ForumParentFirstPreviousNextNext unread
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow