Is everyone here a professional now

Started Jun 3, 2013 | Discussions thread
John1940
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Re: Is everyone here a professional now
In reply to brianj, Jun 4, 2013

brianj wrote:

Chad Gladstone wrote:

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

Did not read the responses but I have been shooting DSLR since the original Canon Rebel days and have substantial investment in equipment now.  I often shoot for others, but decline compensation on principle.  I have observed a stark decline in pro photography gear in public, even in places where only a DSLR is sufficiently capable of capturing the image, irrespective of the shooter's relative skill.  At dance recitals or sporting events there are often no other photography enthusiasts who are documenting the event with anything other than a cell phone.  My observations may be spurious, but I cannot help but contend that people are becoming content with mediocrity and further, that there are few (as a percentage of the populations) that remain committed to remain on the bleeding edge of technological improvements and thus, those who continue to post here, are fast becoming a discrete and insular minority.  Whether there needs to be further compartmentalization beyond enthusiast and professional, is more a measure of compensation, rather than talent.  There is no "fun" in photography.  Capturing an event through the perspective of a tiny viewfinder is a pursuit that benefits only those, dwindling few, who appreciate the effort, and understand how monumental an achievement it is.

I pity those who are attempting to make a profession out of it, as it is a long, solitary road, that, while more and more attempt, fewer can and will succeed at.  The democratization of the modern digital camera appears only to be diluting the pool of fine images and requires, one, by necessity, to wade through the chaff for wheat.  It seems anyone with a few hundred dollars to spend can incorporate, print business cards, and fancy themselves a professional and subject the public to their suspect abilities.  Few are born with it, the rest of us spend a lifetime, chasing after and trying to capture it.

"There is no "fun" in photography."

A wise man once said, 'don't turn your hobby into your work, as you will end up hating it'.

That wise man must have hated his job or profession. He might have been happier if he had done  the opposite earlier in life. Hobbies and professions are not mutually exclusive in my experience. What people have to deal with is whether the hobby, perhaps photography, can support them and their families. Digital photography has dramatically reduced the market demand for traditional professional photography.

Cost cutting has also affected the market for industrial photography, but there are still good opportunities out there for the right photographers. Those folks have to have other skills besides being good photographers. For example, they have to be able to write well, to have good communications skills, to be professional in every way, to have the right equipment, to have a backup colleague, and to know how to run a small business.

Similar market issues hit me as a 33-year-old electronics engineer designing radars for airplanes, which was (and is) a very specialized and narrowing market. I went through five "career changes" within the high-tech arena. It was not easy sometimes but never dull and I never hated it.

John1940

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