Is everyone here a professional now

Started Jun 3, 2013 | Discussions thread
jrtrent
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,264
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Re: It's not about being a professional...
In reply to brianj, Jun 3, 2013

brianj wrote:

I think this response defines my point better:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51575073

and I don't think it has been answered yet.

I liked Draek's answer in the first response on this thread, "...it's simply putting more thought into what you do."

brianj wrote:

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

An analogy might be made to bowling.  Lots of people go with friends to the bowling alley; they rent shoes, use a house ball, maybe share a pitcher of beer, and have a great time.  Sometimes, one or more of them might start paying attention to the game itself.  Maybe they wonder why an apparent good hit didn't result in a strike.  They might read books, talk to the staff at the bowling center or the local pro shop; maybe they buy their own ball and shoes, take lessons, learn about different lane conditions, add to their equipment over time to enhance their ability to strike more consistently under those varying conditions.  They are putting more thought into the hobby, and they're having a great time.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?

To some degree, I suppose we're all a product of our experiences, but I've never understood the sentiment that an SLR is somehow an unusual choice for a photo hobbyist.  I recall that it was a necessary piece of equipment to enroll in the high school photography class (1970's), and authors like Brian Bower and others have, for decades, been writing that the SLR was, outside the studio, the standard tool for most professional and serious amateur photographers.  And why not?  It's highly versatile, comfortable to hold, and has a control layout that is both easy to use and fairly comprehensive.  Whatever the hobby, whether it's cyciling, hifi, cooking, archery, fishing, hunting, target shooting, bowling, or photography, part of the fun is increasing one's knowledge and skill in that hobby.  My opinion is that when a person has learned how to exploit the controls and accessories available on a DSLR, they're in a better position to understand and get the most out of a point and shoot camera, just as when a person has learned to exploit the different characteristics of his entire arsenal of bowling balls, he is better equipped to understand and get the most out of a typical hard plastic house ball.  My experience has been that taking a hobby seriously, putting more thought into it, increases rather than decreases the pleasure and satisfaction I get out of that hobby.

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