Backup, if you don’t do it, do it now

Started May 19, 2013 | Discussions thread
RoelHendrickx
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Re: What needs to survive?
In reply to Guy Parsons, May 20, 2013

Guy Parsons wrote:

JudyN wrote:

Guy Parsons wrote:

So far no offsite storage as nothing is really that critical, if the house gets lost then the data is the very least of my worries.

That's not how I feel about it.  My many many years of photographs are more important than most of the things in my house.

A little overstated by me, but it's only personal stuff and holidays, nothing there that pays the rent.

I guess when Lyn and I fall off the twig all our disk drives etc will get junked anyway, no-one further down the line would be particularly interested in what we did.

I agree that unless I really make a name for myself as photographer no one is really going to look through hard drives with countless gigabytes of raw files, after my demise.

That is why what we print (or display online) is more important : at least that is manageable.

I keep my processed photos in directories of which the subject and time period are easily recognizable.

However, Lyn's digging in the family tree has really highlighted the value of long lasting prints. So slowly we are scanning and re-printing old fading prints from up to more than 100 years ago, plus printing family interest shots from all ages and making sure it is on quality print media and pigment inks, so may last reasonably well.

A shoe-box (hopefully all acid free and prints in sleeves of acid free paper) might last and be of interest down the track. The hard drives that have that old and not used for 50 years SATA and USB connections will just see the dustbin.

The images to print like that are family members, and houses and cars that we owned and general street scenes from whatever era.

The arty-farty images of waterfalls and old trees etc are of absolutely no interest to future image explorers, unless your name happens to be Ansel Adams.

Witness the world heritage importance of a collection of wet process glass plates found in an old garage some years back in Sydney. These shots have enormous interest to historians.

Regards..... Guy

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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