xp hang up

Started Apr 14, 2013 | Discussions thread
tcg550
Contributing MemberPosts: 799
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Re: Don't -- that's only an urban legend
In reply to Jim Cockfield, Apr 16, 2013

Jim Cockfield wrote:

Richard wrote:

Put drive in freezer, remove it and use macrium reflect to try to get a good backup of your drive using a different computer with macrium installed. Once you have the backup. Buy a new drive and restore.  Do not use the old drive any more do not turn the computer on. The drive is only going to get worse in a short period of time. The more you use it the more likely you will lose more data.

http://lifehacker.com/5515337/save-a-failed-hard-drive-in-your-freezer-redux

If this does not work, I hope you have a good backup of your drive. Buy a new drive and restore whatever backup you have or reinstall. The drive is bad, do not use it anymore. Whenever you get an error, make sure you have a backup, or use the process above to get a backup and buy an new drive.

Don't (put your hard drive in a freezer and expect to recover more data from it), as you'll be risking drive platter issues due to condensation forming and more.

Instead, I'd strongly recommend using ddrescue to copy the drive contents to a disk image file, and/or cloning the drive to a new drive instead.

Then (only after getting the best copy possible) should you attempt to run utilities like chkdsk (because you'll want those types running against a partition on a drive without any hard errors on it, so it can concentrate on file system errors only.

More about using ddrescue here:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/50808680

Feel free to add to this forum thread.  But, please do not put your drive in a freezer if you want to have a better chance at recovering data from it.

Ditto for continuing to use utilities like chkdsk.  Stop using them immediately, as they can cause more problems (for example, trying to fix file system errors on a failing drive, when more sectors are going bad each time you run chkdsk).

I'd strongly suggest that you immediately abort any efforts to use utilities to try and "fix" a failing drive until after you get a good copy using ddrescue or similar.  That way, the fix utilities only need to worry about file system errors, since a new drive won't have any failing physical sectors on it to worry about.

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JimC
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I've used the freezer trick in the past. I have only used it when all else failed and assumed the data was gone. I have done it with ddrescue and recovered data that was assumed lost.

Everyone's mileage may vary.

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