A result of negative user feedback for Windows 8?

Started Mar 28, 2013 | Discussions thread
Jim Cockfield
Forum ProPosts: 14,654
Like?
speed, workflow, etc.
In reply to Glen Barrington, Apr 2, 2013

Glen Barrington wrote:

I've been pretty impressed with DigiKam so far.

I've been using digiKam (and showFoto which is the editing component without the album management stuff included) it for years, watching it mature more and more over time.

Sure, for a free image management app with lots of features (and make sure to install the kipi-plugins package to get a lot more features in apps like digiKam, Gwenview, showFoto, etc.), it's terrific.

BTW, make sure to install Gwenview, too (as it's great for fast browsing of folders full of jpeg files, and can use some of the same plugins that digiKam can use (again, make sure to install the kipi-plugins package).  Also, make sure that showFoto is installed (it gives you the same editing ability as digiKam).

But, digiKam and showFoto are  slow as molasses compared to a product like AfterShot Pro (which is *very* fast compared to almost any other image management/raw conversion app).

So, if you value your time, spend the $59 that Corel wants for AfterShot Pro right now (it's on sale at that price).

Keep in mind that Bibble Labs charged $199 for Bibble Pro (and they offered a standard version with fewer features), and IMO, it was well worth the $199 they asked for it.

After Corel purchased Bibble Labs, they dropped the standard version of Bibble, and only offer the Pro version (relaunched as Corel AfterShot Pro), at a retail price of $99 (and you can buy it at the sale price of only $59.99 right now).  That's a huge bargain for a product that capable.

Again, as mentioned in my last post about it, you can also use the same license key under both Linux and Windows.   So, you can have it installed in both operating systems on the same PC (and point it to the same shared catalogs, etc., regardless of the OS you boot into).

I've spent time using both Lightroom and AfterShot Pro, and frankly I prefer AfterShot Pro, thanks to features like being able to edit raw files (non destructive editing) without importing them to a catalog first, as it works both ways, with better speed and more features if you do import them first; edit layers and regions, etc.

If you're not working with a lot of images, I guess digiKam can work (as it is a very full featured product).

But, if you want a product that saves you tons of time, I'd strongly suggest installing Corel AfterShot Pro.  Just download both the Windows and Linux versions (and the .deb files work fine in Debian or Ubuntu based distros), and test drive it.   It's *extremely* fast.   Again, take some time to watch the webinar I linked to in my last post to get a better idea of what it's capable of.      This one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i633ZBya9Fc

More here (but I'd watch that longer one first, as it delves into a lot more about the product and would help you to understand what to look for when test driving it):

http://www.corel.com/corel/pages/index.jsp?pgid=12800011&storeKey=us&languageCode=en

BTW, if you have any stability issues, just go into AfterShot Pro preferences and disable GPU acceleration.  The latest version uses OpenCL to speed up time even more via your video card.  But, it's very fast without that feature enabled (GPU acceleration is a brand new feature and they're still working out a few kinks).   I'm using an Nvidia GT 440 with the latest drivers from Nvidia, and I have not had any problems with it. But, some users have some odd quirks. and disabling GPU acceleration has solved them.

Even without GPU Acceleration enabled, it "runs circles" around most any other product for processing/conversion speed (building thumbnail previews, editing, exporting to other formats, etc.).  It's *very* fast.

I rarely spend money for software anymore, as there are so many open source options available (and I've got lots of image editing/management/viewer apps installed in both Windows and Linux).  But, in the case of AfterShot Pro, IMO, it's well worth the money over the free alternatives, as you can probably justify the cost in one weekend's time savings alone it's so much faster than the available open source alternatives (or other commercial alternatives for that matter), whether you're using Windows or Linux to run it.

Again, you can download a trial version and test drive it for 30 days.  If you don't like it, don't buy it. 

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JimC
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