More D7000 back focus. I thought this issue was dead!?

Started Mar 6, 2013 | Discussions thread
Kerry Pierce
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guilty as charged
In reply to Mako2011, Mar 6, 2013

Mako2011 wrote:

chuhsi wrote:

I've had my D7000 for 3.5 months and thought a lot of my wide open pictures were slightly blurry because of user error. I finally decided to do some lens fine tuning last night to see if backfocus was my issue.

I'm always surprised how slow folks are to test their equipment.

Guilty. Guilty.. Guilty... I've used a Nikon dslr since 2004, 10 in total.  I never worried about rigorously testing any Nikon body.  I was a so-called "beta tester" pre-ordering the d70's, d200's, d300's and d700, when they were announced. They worked right out of the box, the way they were supposed to work.  PDAF is not a new feature and Nikon certainly has (had?) the expertise and experience to make a reliable dslr with PDAF.

My "testing" procedure of a new body has always been a brief run through of all the various components, usually taking less far less than an hour, ending with snapping a bunch of different shots in the house, ensuring that both screwdriver and AF-S lenses work.

All that changed after my purchase of the d7k, which was within a couple days of my purchase of a used d3s. Both cameras passed my initial indoor "snapshot" tests. It wasn't until a couple of months or so later that I got both outdoors and had my initial indications that the d7k AF wasn't working as it should.

I test each new lens and body within the first day. It only takes a few minutes to confirm focus or determine if the lens or camera is out of spec. Glad you finally decided to check. Here is a good tutorial...hope your didn't check in dim light that can be problematic regardless of lens or body make/model.

Well, I performed that kind of test, if I understand your method, and it didn't indicate an issue with my d7k. My d7k has issues with some of my 3rd party lenses, because Nikon has changed something in the newer models. Otherwise, it had inconsistent AF issues, primarily at medium to long distances, so it didn't always produce failure, regardless as to the maker of the lens.

I'd suggest that your testing method won't always find possible issues, unless you are also doing a number of consistency shots, at the full variety of distances from MFD to infinity, as well. Inconsistent focus issues aren't so easily found and resolved.

As soon as my d800 arrived, I spent several hours, over a period of several days, performing a very rigorous set of tests on the AF alone. It was the first Nikon that I ever felt the need to do that, but it won't likely be the last.  I find that rather sad.

Kerry

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