Canon EOS 6D In-Depth Review posted

Started Feb 13, 2013 | Discussions thread
bobn2
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Re: Canon EOS 6D In-Depth Review posted
In reply to desidown, Mar 1, 2013

desidown wrote:

Noogy wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

Noogy wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

Noogy wrote:

Intel on quality, and why Nikon benchmarked with us: We learned big time from the floating point unit flaw, a $400 Million mistake. Read about it in Andry Grove's "Only the Paranoid Survive."

Oh yes there had been bugs in some product releases. I never claimed there weren't any. You are talking about 45 nanometer manufacturing, soon 22 nanometer manufacturing. Nikon's D600 does not possess nanometer technology. They had more room to get the packaging right. When Apple demanded the MacBook Air, did you know how much time they gave Intel engineers to get it right?

There is a packaging defect in a product that was rated gold. To this day Nikon is not able to offer an unconditional statement that the packaging has been fixed or modified.

The fact remains - they rushed a full-frame DSLR into production and then compelled consumers to bear the brunt. The point here is - how can you give gold to a camera that came in a defective packaging technology? Never mind if the 6D got a silver. You DPR reviewers - have you deliberately talked about how your rating and assessment methodology should likewise scale to the evolving times, how it should be modified beyond just offering more convenience in comparing JPEGS of various camera models?

You terminology is all confused. Not convincing.

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Bob

Show me your badge to be credible in your fake engineering postings and I will show you my Intel badge. Come on!

LOL. If you were willing to show your Intel badge you'd just have shown it. In any case, even if you do work for Intel, who knows what job you do. Beverage Dispensing Consultant? So let's talk about what you said:

You are talking about 45 nanometer manufacturing, soon 22 nanometer manufacturing.

Someone in the semiconductor industry would talk about 'technology nodes' or 'process' not 'manufacturing'.

Nikon's D600 does not possess nanometer technology.

'Nanometer technology', what's that? Neither 22m nor 45nm are close to 'nanometre technology', which would imply feature sizes of a nanometre or so. As it happens the Sony sensors that Nikon uses for the D800 and D600 use a 180nm process, while the Canon sensors use a 500nm process. Neither is remotely 'nanometre technology'.

When it comes to rushing a DSLR into production, yes its a shame when that happens, such as the 1DIII's AF problems, the 7D's AF problems, the 5DIII's light leak problem. All the manufacturers could do with better QC.

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Bob

Wrong again. Nanometer is a fabrication hence part of manufacturing terminology. At Intel, the Technology and Manufacturing Group (TMG) operates what we call the virtual factory where the coherent relationship between fab and ATM (Assembly and Test Manufacturing) is comprehended for efficiency. The chip is made in a fab before it is shipped for assembly and test (including cutting the die, etc.). Nikon btw is one of our largest suppliers of cameras, especially for atomic microscope. Need I say more?

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JCC
"Photography is therapeutic."
http://www.pbase.com/joshcruzphotos

I am sure you worked at Intel at some point but do not work there anymore. If you did you would be reminded frequently that we NEVER talk about our suppliers on public forums unless authorized by Intel. We tend to lose our negotiating positions (among other things) if our supplier details become known publicly. Just naming the supplier might not be harmful but why go down that route ? If you do still work for Intel then I suggest you stop talking about internal details before you get in trouble. I am quite certain I am not the only Intel employee on these forums

I don't work at Intel, so I'm free to talk about it :-). What is quite sad about huge corporations is the knock-on effects that their operations can have. I understand that Intel did have an ATM plant in the Philippines up to 2008 or so, and then closed it, leaving a lot of skilled Philippinos out of work, and without much hope of securing a similar position in their own locality. It's not at all surprising that one or two of them might be in denial. Particularly sad for this guy, who seems to have made a big speech about opportunities in the semiconductor industry, just before the plant was closed. I know you can't comment, nor do I expect you to.

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Bob

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