D 7100 6 shot Raw Buffer IMO D400 still coming

Started Feb 21, 2013 | Discussions thread
jfriend00
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Re: No way and forget the 7DMk2 as well
In reply to Franglais91, Feb 22, 2013

Franglais91 wrote:

When Nikon phase out a product line they introduce a boosted version of the next model underneath that is almost as good but not quite.

We saw this with the high-end pro DX models. The DX-format D2X gave way to the FX-format D3. And the DX-format D200 was packed with D3 features to make the D300. A hugely successful - but temporary - DX pro camera.

Now the D300 has gone and been replaced with the D800 as lower-end pro camera. And we see the D7000 being packed with the 51-point autofocus, weather sealing etc. from the upper models - while still remaining a pro-am camera.

Forget the D400. It will never happen.

Canon's recent strategy has been to clone the most successful cameras in each segment, better if possible:

Nikon D300 gives Canon D7

Nikon D4 gives Canon D1X

Sony NEX gives Canon M

But if there is no D400 that means no 7DMk2, but a 70D which is a D7100 equivalent.

BTW - I hope I'm wrong for all the people out there who are hoping for a D400 or whatever. But well - my scenario is horribly believable..

That's kind of what I thought might happen too, but the one thing that I can't really explain is why the D7100's buffer is so intentionally small.  RAM is darn cheap these days.  If Nikon really wanted to sweep up as many D300 users as possible with the D7100, it would have cost them almost nothing to make the D7100 buffer much larger and they would have had a much better chance at getting D300 shooters to go to the D7100.

But, they didn't choose that.  I don't think Nikon is dumb and just missed this opportunity.  So, I think it has to be part of a larger plan and that larger plan must mean that there's a higher priced DX camera coming that will contain a much larger buffer, something that beats or exceeds the D300.  I can simply find no other logical explanation for the artificially small buffer in the D7100.  They had a camera that could have been aggressively marketed at enthusiast action/sports shooters and they intentionally crippled it (you only get 1 second of max fps in RAW).  No rational company would do that without a reason.  I don't see how they could be protecting the D600, D800 or D4 with this small buffer as those cameras are just so different.  I can come to no other conclusion that  it has to be a future DX camera that they're protecting.

If you have a different explanation for why they artificially limited the potential market for the D7100 with this small buffer, I'm open to other ideas.

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