How can I improve my landscape photos

Started Feb 19, 2013 | Discussions thread
Denjw
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Re: How can I improve my landscape photos
In reply to dj1, Feb 19, 2013

Hi Rick

You sure had some difficult shooting conditions.

Some good advice already given on how to overcome these conditions.

When using pattern/multi metering the camera can be easily tricked into massively blowing highlights in contrasty light.

You may also want to look at what area of the scene where your camera is pointing/focusing on as is taking its metering (exposure reading) from that area, ie, whatever the auto-focus area is pointing at is the "subject" and the camera is trying meter a proper exposure by assigning the subject a middle tone.

Apart from other ways already suggested there is a couple of other options you could try.

  • First put your camera in aperture priority and set a good aperture for the scene you are trying to capture, say f8 of f11.
  • Then meter on a dark part of the scene and note the shutter speed the camera suggests.
  • Now point at a lighter part of the scene and do the same.
  • Next, move your camera setting to manual and put the aperture to the same setting you just used.
  •  Now set the shutter speed to a point midway between the two points you just noted and take a picture.

Check the image on the LCD and determine if you have captured what you intended. You may have to compromise to get the detail you want in the dark areas, or to get good colors and detail in the lighter areas. You may also have to take several readings from different parts of the scene. Finally, you will need to decide what part of the scene is the most important and make sure that this area is getting the best exposure.

Or

  • Switch to aperture or shutter priority, spot metering, and set exposure compensation to +1 1/3 or +1 2/3.
  • Point your camera at various candidate locations for the brightest portion of the scene.
  • Press the AE Lock button or half press the shutter release to get a reading, repeat until you know which portion of the scene is brightest.
  • Leave that exposure locked in with AE Lock or half shutter.
  • Recompose and shoot.
  • Press AE Lock again to turn it off.

Hope this helps and good shooting.

Cheers

Dennis

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