Did meteorite strike Pentax Ricoh Imaging Company overnight?

Started Feb 15, 2013 | Discussions thread
Tom Caldwell
Forum ProPosts: 18,151
Like?
Re: Did meteorite strike Pentax Ricoh Imaging Company overnight?
In reply to sroute, Feb 16, 2013

sroute wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

There was a small article in the local press last week about a decent sized meteorite that was going to "fly by" on a rather close predicted path (they thought it would "miss"). Talking about one big enough to do some serious damage but not the end of the earth type. More like bad luck if it hit your part of the world (as it could possibly) - just the equivalent a few nuclear bombs - I forget how many exactly.

I had forgotten about it. Perhaps this was she ... Sounds like we got off lightly.

No, that one did fly by as predicted; the two events are completely unrelated - an eerie coincidence, no more. Here's the official statement from NASA:

"According to NASA scientists, the trajectory of the Russia meteor was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, making it a completely unrelated object. Information is still being collected about the Russia meteor and analysis is preliminary at this point. In videos of the meteor, it is seen to pass from left to right in front of the rising sun, which means it was traveling from north to south. Asteroid DA14's trajectory is in the opposite direction, from south to north."

The meteorite that descended into Russia has been estimated at 9 or 10 tonnes.

The asteroid "2012 DA14" which came within the distance at which geo-synchronous satellites orbit the earth was smallish by asteroid standards but was orders of magnitude more massive than the meteroid which hit Russie.

DA14 has been estimated as having a mass of 130,000 metric tons. Were it to enter the atmosphere and then explode over a large populated city, there wouldn't be a population left.

In 2880 it might be a good time to take a vacation to Mars. There will probably be other moments before then when we wish we could park off planet for a while as they continue to discover new "near earth" objects and refine trajectories until solid patterns are determined.

Thanks, I am not 100% asleep but not really awake either.

I remember something about an international panel of scientists years ago who were supposedly working together on a plan to rocket nuclear war-headed missiles into an approaching meteor on collision course so that they could break it up. A fireworks display that I hope will never be needed.

Presumably a shower is better than a thump.

-- hide signature --

Tom Caldwell

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow