-Beginner a77 - and suggestions about tamron PS 70-300 USD Di

Started Feb 6, 2013 | Discussions thread
NoeGrapher
New MemberPosts: 22
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Re: -Beginner a77 - and suggestions about tamron PS 70-300 USD Di
In reply to AntonyJ, Feb 10, 2013

AntonyJ wrote:

The Sony/Tamron 18-250 is actually quite good if you value convenience over ultimate quality. It can be useful as a travel/walkaround lens as you don't need to carry anything else. I have one for that purpose. And you shouldn't get so hung up over pixel-level image quality. A lot of things can be corrected on your PC - you should invest in a copy of Lightroom or similar. You need to enjoy taking photos and you can't take photos if you get fed up lugging around more gear than you need...

That said, my main lens choice is these three:

  • Tokina 11-16/2.8
  • Tamron 17-50/2.8
  • Tamron 70-300 USD

SAL 18250 was my first choice, but I ended up with tammy which was cheaper and for other reasons that I didn't mention in the main thread. Maybe for a new photographer, sal18250 would be a suitable choice thanks to its focal range. He would enjoy shooting outdoors and indoors photos (at the first place)

The 17-50 stays on my camera most of the time, and often it's the only lens I have with me. It's much cheaper than the Sony 16-50 and by all accounts nearly the same image quality. But it is a screw-drive lens so the sound (I think it's quite quiet) will be picked up on video. The range gives a lot of flexibility, and with f2.8 I never use flash. I wouldn't agree with the posters who suggested the 28-75. Not because I have anything against that lens, it's just the range doesn't go wide enough - but it really depends what you shoot. You could always pick up a used model of that or the original Minolta 28-135, 35-105, 28-105, or 24-105 and see how that range works for you without having to spend a great deal.

The 17-50 should be a good choice and alternative for sony 16-50 and costs about half price. For my actual shooting needs the keyword is :  wider. I believe that you can't make good compositions without a context which is more defined when there are enough elements in the scene. A wider lens with minimum distortion should help here. Unless doing some PP.

The Tokina is great for landscapes, inside/outside buildings, etc. Not so good for people due to distortion in the corners. Without the ultra wide angle you'll need to stitch multiple photos together, either in-camera with the panorama function or better using a program like Hugin (free).

Finally as others have said: keep the 70-300 USD.

Ok, thanks, I got your point.

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