Just finished a short film shot on hacked GH2, feedback appreciated!

Started Jan 17, 2013 | Discussions thread
Apfelbaum
Regular MemberPosts: 198
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Re: Just finished a short film shot on hacked GH2, feedback appreciated!
In reply to Keith Lommel, Jan 31, 2013

Yes, youtube does have a 15 minute limitation unless you are a "partner" contributor. That said, I think if you go back and look the cut over, there is a lot of cutting that can be done to tighten that story up. I watched a full 5 minutes of it, then checked the trt and was :-O. For a short it is very long, especially because the basic story isn't that complex.

For instance: in the very beginning, you can get away with one establishing shot (exterior), that will immediately take us inside and you can show the actor next. You can cut down the time of the next series of shots some and you can actually eliminate a couple. I am pretty sure that if you go about it thoroughly, you can cut half the time out of the opening sequence. This will also help your story "move along". There are a lot of scenes in this that can use "tightening" up. Some can be deleted all together (the scene where he finds out where the factory is). The viewer already knows he is going to keep looking, so it's not a surprise that he ends up there.

Some handheld would have been good at the factory. When there is faster action then dialogue, faster cuts, handheld movement, and carefully applied zooming, will make the action move faster, otherwise, despite him running, it "feels" slow. On average, your shots in the factory are over 10 seconds per shot, if you have some detail shots, feet running, hands on rails, you can cut most of these down to 3-4 seconds. While not loosing any of the story. Overall, I think you can cut this down to 10 minutes no problem and keep the whole story intact, also use some background music during dialogue.

The beautiful thing about non-linear pc based editing is that you can try all of this out and it won't harm your footage in anyway.  Give it a shot.

Most beginning cinematographers/editors "fall in love" with their shots more then they should so there is personal attachment to a scene or a series of shots. Don't let that happen to you. Be critical of the story, because that is the true essence of a cinematographer. Think about what an audience would like.

Hope this helps.

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