Looking for critique, Im losing faith if photography is for me.

Started Jan 21, 2013 | Discussions thread
krugman
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Re: Looking for critique, Im losing faith if photography is for me.
In reply to Cameranoobie, Jan 25, 2013

I would offer the following suggestions:

I think many of the images you have posted could be improved by post processing. I tend to shoot in JPEG and then post process in iPhoto on my Mac, to keep it simple and easy, but there are more elaborate ways to post process also.  I think you would be much more pleased with  your images if  you tried post processing. You could improve the exposure, crop the image to concentrate on the important elements, get rid of blown highlights, remove unpleasant color casts, increase resolution or sharpness or contrast, get more detail in shadow areas if you want, and so forth. It's quite easy to do and it can transform a photograph into one you will like much more.

Most of us find that only a few of our images are outstanding, so don't get discouraged. What you see posted is only a small fraction of the images the person has taken.

On a more general note, I have found that if I have a good understanding of what I am photographing, my images are much better. In my case I know a fair amount about cities and urbanism, and this has helped my travel photos in urban areas. My images  of mountains would be a lot better if I knew a lot more about mountains. Similarly for other subjects, like flowers or birds or cars or boats or beaches or fishing or rafting or climbing or whatever interests you.

I have found it helpful also to study carefully the images of photographers whose work appeals to me and who photograph the same kinds of subjects I do. For example I have learned a lot from the travel photos of Carolyn Hammett, and from the architectural photos of Gianni Galassi, and from the urban photos of Andre Kertesz, and from the approach to people of the photojournaiist Gary Knight, and from the work of  Vivian Maier.

Some people think the camera takes the picture. More thoughtful people say the photographer takes the picture.  The most thoughtful people say that the picture takes the photographer; by this they mean that the subject of the photo calls out to the photographer. This happens because the photographer knows a great deal about the subject and is deeply interested in it.

I hope this will be helpful.

Krugman

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