Tedolph opinion.

Started Jan 18, 2013 | Discussions thread
mh2000
Senior MemberPosts: 2,616
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Re: Inspiration knows no Rules ...
In reply to Detail Man, Jan 20, 2013

Detail Man wrote:

f8_accpmpli wrote:

...pretty much what Bob T said ^above^

It seems to me that it is most important to;

1) know what the rule (guideline) is,

2) know why it is a rule(guideline),

3) understand the boundaries that you can stretch when you purposefully break the rule or exceed the guideline. The emphasis here on "purposefully" is to make you think about the compositional element that you are trying to emphasize in the photograph and why it is OK to skirt the rule.

It is indeed quite possible to break every "rule" without ever knowing a single one of them ...

With my first P&S, the only rules that I knew were how to use the Zoom, how to adjust Exposure Compensation until the bulk of the lit-up "dots" on the Live Histogram was around 80% (or so), and how to wait until the AF Focus Area turned green to fully press the Shutter Button. The only ones that I wish (in retrospect) that I had better understood were those that govern Depth of Field.

In a lot of ways, I think that many of my early compostional choices were more adventuresome, and as often worked out quite well, when essentially unencumbered by technical trepidations - as my mind and hands followed only my eyes with a minimum of intellectual distractions encumbering them.

All in all, if what one sees (or previews) does not please the eyes and the mind in the first place, then there likely is not much point or purpose in pushing the Shutter Button, anyway. Inspiration cannot be synthesized or automated - or taken in 2nd-hand from external directives from others.

(For me) "keepers" and "gems" arise much more out of inspirations than out of trepidations.

This is true because we instinctively know what is good composition and if you go back you will find that many of your better photos roughly agree with some of the rules. The problem with any rules for photographic composition is that nothing of interest will lend itself to adhering to all the rules at once and when you try to force something to follow the rules you typically destroy what is interesting in the first place. As a photographer, we are stuck with the messiness of reality and have to work with it and not try to force it to adhere to arbitrary rules.

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