Exposure Compensation

Started Dec 31, 2012 | Questions thread
Topaz
Contributing MemberPosts: 588
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Re: Exposure Compensation
In reply to WilbaW, Jan 3, 2013

WilbaW wrote:

I don't expect we'll continue this discussion, but thanks for the opportunity to find out that there literally is such a thing as an exposure compensation function in M.

Nice research, WilbaW.  It would take me forever to read through all those manuals myself (though I am tempted).  I think you are very possibly right on a few of them.  I think you are very possibly misreading & misinterpreting some of the others.

And I am almost sure that on a few (Nikon D7000 at a minimum) there literally *is* a true exposure compensation *function* in manual mode which allows overriding of the auto-ISO feature.  I footnoted that in one of my posts earlier and never denied that existed; but it does not exist on Canon bodies, which don't have this feature.

On the Nikon, M mode, you can direct the auto-ISO to result in an exposure that is brighter or darker than standard exposure.   "manual mode" is a bit of a misnomer on these cameras for M mode with auto-ISO turned on.  There's nothing manual about it.  It's just as automatic as Av and Tv in that case, so of course there is a role for EC.  It's not about manually setting your parameters away from standard metering; rather it's about setting aperture and shutter arbitrarily, and letting the camera automatically calculate ISO to result in your chosen offset from standard metering.  That's a real EC function, in the exact same sense EC offsets the aperture calculation in Tv mode and the shutter calculation in Av mode.

Sadly Canon omits this useful feature from its bodies.

So that's what I think the Nikon example might be referring to, and possibly some of the other excerpts you posted (anybody know?).  I have also read that Nikon has an "EC" feature in M mode, which is a bit bizarre to me, that simply lets you forcibly move the on-screen meter needle to the right or the left of where it actually should be relative to the camera's standard exposure calculation.  Again, this is an actual feature (no matter how silly it seems to me), and is different than what the OP discussed.

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