Olbers' paradox: why is the night sky dark?

Started Nov 12, 2012 | Discussions thread
Jonny Boyd
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Re: Olbers' paradox: why is the night sky dark?
In reply to trisd, Dec 2, 2012

trisd wrote:

Jonny Boyd wrote:

That's not a contradiction. Each pixel that does not have its line of sight blocked by a star from the 1r shell will see one star star from the 1.41r shell. This star will occupy half of each pixel, leaving half a pixel for stars from the 2r shell. There is no contradiction there.

So you imagine they are smaller. They should all be point sources. It's all nonsense then, and you still don't get uniform brightness.

They are all point sources from the perspective of the detector.  I explicitly mention that each time. But to work out how many will be images by each pixel, you need to know their real size. And the result is uniform brightness because of this.

Your picture is wrong. The images in the topright and bottom right are wrong. You've increased the brightness of the stars from the 1r shell. Remember that the 1r stars are large enough to occupy one pixel, so those pixels will not get brighter.

I'm especially surprised to see you making that mistake when you've been so insiatent about the effect of stars blocking others. Light can'trravel through stars. What it can do it heat stars up so that they glow brighter, but the effect of one shell would be incredibly small and if you're taking that into account then you need to model the effect of an infinite number of shells.

I did what you said:

4.) This means that each pixel will have one of these stars

...tried to make sense of nonsense. It seemed you are trying to say the light would spill over to neighboring pixels, but I see I should just ignore you. Dream on.

I didn't think it needed to be spelled out explicitly that pixels which can see a star from the 1r shell will have their line of sight blocked to the the other shells and other stars. Certainly that's how I modelled it.

Taking that into account, you still have nothing to show a flaw in the mathematics. I guess your ideas must have no weight then if you can't find a problem with the calculations. I guess there's not much point in anyone listening to you any longer then. Unless you can find a real flaw. Or admit that you're wrong.

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