3570k vs 3770k performance with DPP

Started Sep 10, 2012 | Discussions thread
andrewsf
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Re: 3570k vs 3770k performance with DPP
In reply to CSMR, Sep 15, 2012

Its not hard at all. Most modern motherboards will come with an OC utility to squeeze some more performance out of a processor. Add a decent cooler to your build and you have a guaranteed performance boost.

OP - The difference is mainly hyperthreading which with most applications is not that useful as they are technically a virtual core. however, some apps can utilise this feature and photoshop is one of them.

I have a 3770K running a mild overclock and working with large files is a piece of cake.

Like you, I went 16GB and do not regret it at all. I run some virtual machines so having the extra RAM is useful there too.

If you can afford the 3770K over the 3570K then I would say go for it. The increase in performance relative to the increased cost may not be so good but when you're dealing with a lot of large files, any speed boost is priceless.

I also went the Ivy Bridge on board video route initially but found it to be lacking. Scrolling was jerky and the display was generally not up to the performance the other components enabled. A friend had an old 3D card lying around so I put that in and everything is silky smooth now.

You can get by with on board video but don't rule out a discrete card.

All the best.

Andrew
Cheers and

CSMR wrote:

Bob Collette wrote:

CSMR wrote:

Overclocking is not sensible as modern computers are very fast anyway and overclocking takes a lot of effort and supervision and leads to unstable systems. It's a very risky thing to do with a computer.

While overclocking is not for everyone, I disagree that it takes a lot of effort...

Sorry but backed up my point with a list of all the things, both setup and continual maintenance, that you need to do:

If you plan on overclocking, you need to plan for it.

It also means running some utilities to check CPU temperatures and stability, slowly going up in clock speed while you check stability and temperature. You also need to research what voltages are safe, as you'll likely need to increase some voltages to maintain stability as you increase the clock speed. ... research the topic and develop a systematic approach to overclocking

It is a lot of effort.

I disagree that it... always leads to unstable systems.

I cannot argue that it ALWAYS leads to unstable systems. However it leads to much more unstable systems ON AVERAGE. As shown by this research from Microsoft:

http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/131739-microsoft-analyzes-over-a-million-pc-failures-results-shatter-enthusiast-myths

Note that this instability is despite the fact that you are dealing with highly skilled computer users who are able to change the clock rates. The fact that even among this group you get unstable computers shows what a bad mistake overclocking is... in today's world when the benefits are minimal.

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