Sigma’s ownership of Foveon sensor – greatest loss for the photographic world

Started Sep 6, 2012 | Discussions thread
stevielee
Senior MemberPosts: 1,135
Like?
Re: Sigma’s ownership of Foveon sensor – greatest loss for the photograph
In reply to flektogon, Sep 7, 2012

flektogon wrote:

Just imagine for example Sony having the Foveon sensor. This idea doesn’t need more words....

Or, Canon, or Nikon, or FujiFilm, or Olympus..etc, etc. But most of the above passed on the Foveon sensor technology when it was first developed and stuck with either the earlier digital CCD sensors, or now mostly CMOS sensors - as they were, and probably still are cheaper and to produce and more reliable in their final imaging output.

So, for good, or bad, or inbetween, anyone who really wants to maybe try out a Foveon sensor'ed camera is ultimately stuck with Sigma Corp's particular brand of mis-implementing this very promising, and (IMO) woefully under-developed (supported) technology.

In fairness, I actually do give Sigma some credit for sticking with the technology and eventually acquiring it outright, even if they have been relatively unable to properly develop and bring to market (at least up until the present) a serious, technologically advanced camera body that can comfortably contend with all of the rest in the big guns in the industry on more or less an equal footing.

This type of technological handicapping of the Foveon sensor abilities is what I believe ihas been primarily the reason why Sigma hasn't managed to carve out more than a very tiny sliver of the overall digital camera market thus far. And we see that so clearly once more with the newest DP(M) models - sporting outstanding optics (something that Sigma can, and frequently does excel at), paired with the best Foveon sensor yet produced, but once again, needlessly encumbered by one of Sigma Corp's versions of their perennially neolithic, almost embarrassingly hobbled black blocked "bodies" that excruciatingly struggles to just try and process a single, simply capture, let alone more technologically sophisticated tasks like multiple exposers in a modern manner, or allowing for a circa 2012 type of higher resolution LCD for basic reviewing, since Sigma seems to have never heard of either an EVF, or short of that, at least include a OVF for more detailed and accurate composing/focusing.

Unless there is some king of a dramatic technological turnaround (via deeper investing in R&D, and/or Sigma Corps willingness to perhaps at least license third party features for inclusion in any new Foveon sensor cameras), then there will continue to be little in the way of these types of necessary, and much belated advancement on all Sigma branded cameras in the foreseeable future.

The DP1/2M could have easily been one of the great, compact digital imaging tools of the year (2012-2013), had Sigma been able and willing to go the extra mile and bring at least one of their digital camera models up to a modern technological snuff.

What they have decidedly done (released) instead: is one of the most interesting digital sensors in around, and put some of their very best glass in front of it - and essentially then called it a day...or a DP1/2M. Paying $1000 buck for basically just the sensor and the lens in front of it (no matter how good either of them are individually, or together) won't ultimately cut it with what the best of the rest in compact digital imaging have to offer..

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Post (hide subjects)Posted by
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow