What lens do I need?

Started Aug 8, 2012 | Discussions thread
sean000
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Re: What lens do I need?
In reply to snph83, Aug 8, 2012

snph83 wrote:

Thanks for all the advice.

If I decide to go with a micro four thirds, I guess I'll go with the included 14-42mm lens and the 40-150mm lens.

I'd be shooting in a variety of situations. That's why I need a regular lens and a lens with good zoom. I'm not a photographer but want good quality pictures. The zoom will come in handy if I have a family or friend's graduation to attend and shoot from the bleachers (indoor) or go to my niece/nephew's school performances (indoor), or an outdoor event where I can't get up close.

One thing you might discover if you use a m4/3 or DSLR camera is that you need to learn more than you needed to know with a compact to get the most out of it. Fortunately m4/3 cameras all come with the same types of "scene modes" that help you choose appropriate settings by scene. But a big advantage of these cameras is that you have the manual controls to choose the most appropriate settings for each shot or scene.

Are these lenses good for shooting indoors? The 14-42 has f3.5-5.6 and 40-150mm has f4.0-5.6.

Not really. The best lenses for shooting indoors in low light are lenses with wide apertures. Most of these are prime lenses (fixed focal length) like the 20mm f/1.7, 25mm f/1.4, and 45mm f/1.8. Of course it helps to have a camera that can shoot better quality at high ISO, but often you need a wide aperture and high ISO.

You know what a lot of people do is keep a compact super-zoom like your SX260 for outdoor photography, and then they get an indoor camera like a m4/3 camera with some primes or a compact camera that has a fast lens (is at least fast at the wide and normal focal lengths).

That can work out to be less expensive, but then you have to carry two cameras to cover all your bases. Sometimes it is easier to learn and deal with only one camera and then switch lenses depending on the situation. I'd say a pretty economical approach would be a 14-42mm kit zoom and a prime like the 20mm f/1.7, 25mm f/1.4, or 45mm f/1.8 for indoor use. Then a 45-200mm or 40-150mm for an inexpensive telephoto zoom.

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