Will you jump to FX for 'affordable' D600?

Started Jul 20, 2012 | Discussions thread
ProfessorJon
Regular MemberPosts: 489
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Re: right ... and wrong ...
In reply to Kim Letkeman, Jul 26, 2012

Hi Kim,

OK, I see how the D7000 could be appealing over a D300 or D700, I guess. Yes, a D600 in a D7000 body would be appealing, indeed.

Sorry about the fall of your camera and lens. Yeah, I saw that post. Guess it was you. Eh, it’s just stuff, eh?

Yes, there is something liberating about shooting with older, cheaper gear. Even if I were to spend the money on, say, a D800 with a 70-200 VRII on it I might be so worried about it that some of the fun would certainly be taken out of photography. On the other hand, the increase in image quality would be much welcomed. The background photo covering my 27” computer screen right here is a recent shot from my D80 at 400 ISO. I can see a little grain over the whole image. Annoying.

Enjoy your new monopod. They are great things. I had a small travel tripod. I think that it was the cheapest little thing from Manfrotto. I got it just to have it around. Ended up using it much more than I ever expected, to the point that the clips broke off. Just upgraded to a sturdier travel tripod. Money very well spent.

Kim Letkeman wrote:

ProfessorJon wrote:

Very nice shots.

Thanks.

Those all sound like good thing. So then why did you go D700 -> D7000 (FX to DX)? Maybe the D7000 is newer and does some things well, despite being DX.

Well, I actually had D300 + D700 and sold the D300 to fund the D7000. After a while, I realized that I was enjoying the reach of the D7000 and found that it felt surprisingly similar to the D700 in the hand. Meaning a very fast shutter sound and very nice balance. The D300 is, of course, an amazing camera. But the D7000 is travel sized and does everything I need, so I finally got rid of the D700 since I was no longer using it much.

In the end, a non-professional is probably better off choosing a subset of tools as the main gig and then getting really good with them. For me, as an opportunistic shooter, the D7000 turned out to have the greater appeal.

Now imagine a D600 in the D7000 body ... hmmm ...

Yup, you can get nice shots with any camera. Well, I should say that "one" may get such nice shots. I'm not saying that I do.

I'll go with "one", but not for that reason ... just because anyone can get great shots with any dSLR with the right approach. Thom Hogan stresses that all the time ...

Sounds like the FX bodies are pretty big, although I've never held one. I have a D80 and a D3000 (long story). I find the D80 to be a nice size but the D3000 too small. My pinky does not rest on the grip. Although I don't think that I'd want a body too much bigger than the D80.

The D300 and D700 have the perfect grip. They are incredible in the hand for that reason. But the D300 is much bigger than any of the consumer cams, and the D700 is noticeably bigger than the D300. One reason why the smart wedding photogs have assistants

I got myself a 50 mm F1.8 and I'm now getting really used to the subject isolation and low light ability of that lens. To the point that I'm thinking about other primes.

Me too. The 180 2.8 is really tugging at my consciousness ...

And it may be almost time to get a newer camera. Then again, sometimes it's nice to shoot with older, cheaper gear. This summer I have had a few cases in which I was in a crowd and the camera on a tripod could have been knocked over. Or my toddler almost grabbed it out of my hands. With my current gear I would not have cared too much. But if it was a $3,000 D800...

Well, I had that exact experience, except it was a prairie wind gust that did the deed. The D7000 is solid enough that in the end Nikon simply straightened the plastic and adjusted the internals such as AF. Better than new ... and they did not charge me for that. Wow ...

I do miss my D70s, I have to say. These are all fun cameras and the lower resolution allows one to just plink about and get nice sharp images. I find the 16MP of the D7000 a real challenge. With unstabilized lenses it is a trivial thing to introduce a small amount of shake.

So today I ordered the Manfrotto 334B monopod and a nice little ball head in order to regain some good habits. Tripod is a bit too cumbersome for walking in the woods (except when you really need it at dawn and dust) ... so the monopod is the weapon of choice. And not expensive at all at BHPhoto ... $92 for the pod (and it is one of the two instant adjustable ones you can get) and 40 for a nice Arca compatible head with an extra plate. Wicked ...

As Thom and others continue to say ... investing in skills is always going to pay off much more quickly than investing in hardware.

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