Nikon vs free speech

Started Jun 28, 2012 | Discussions thread
happypoppeye
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Re: Of course Yes
In reply to Guy M Wong, Jul 1, 2012

I don't know ...so it seems Nikon should have done their homework before agreeing to anything and thats the only problem here.

So i"ll take it as, Nikon agreed on a showing in their building, Nikon cancelled the showing when they found out this has a political agenda, using the defense of they don't want to have an anti government showing in their name ...which was probably the right thing to do on nikons part.

So, since they agreed in the first place, pay the guy money he spent on promoting the show ...which probably isn't much. Case closed. This isn't a political issue or freedom of speech issue in my opinion. This is about business.

Why is everything so difficult these days? If I scheduled a showing at the local gallery and they agreed and than I showed up with a whole bunch of pro Osama Bin Laden stuff ...I would hope they would shut it down right away. It's probably the right thing to do. Not the right place for it. Thats that. Their gallery, their building, their reputation. Did the photographer explain to Nikon wht he was showing? ...a lot of heresay in this whole story.

Guy M Wong wrote:

Fortunately, it doesn't work that way. Once Nikon made the commitment to the photographer, Nikon must have a reasonable cause to terminate that commitment and/or provide monetary damages. So far, Nikon has not given any such reasonable cause. Here is an excerpt from a U.S. Wall Street Journal blog, quoting the judge:

http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2012/06/25/judge-orders-nikon-to-hold-comfort-women-photo-exhibit/

In his ruling Judge Itami said that that the political goal of the photos was an invalid reason for cancelling the show. “Even if a photo exhibit is tinged with politics or has some meaning as political activities, it could coexist with the mission of development of photo culture,” Judge Itami wrote.

When Nikon unilaterally terminated the commitment to the photographer without giving any reason, but appeared to have provided the following statement to the Japanese court, Nikon infringed on the photographer's free speech rights. Here is the statement purportedly given by Nikon, “It has become clear that this photo exhibit is part of his political activities and it is tinged with politics. As it clearly does not fit the original mission of photo exhibits at Nikon salon, Nikon decided to cancel the offer.”

Since when does a factual historical themed exhibit become anti-Japanese? Here in the U.S., we have a Holocaust Museum in Los Angeles. No one would think for one minute that the museum is anti-German.

Here is another article that describes these "comfort women":

http://www.japansubculture.com/comfort-women-photo-show-makes-nikon-uncomfortable-but-not-tokyo-district-court/

"Who were the comfort women? They were Korean, Chinese, and sometimes even Japanese women who worked as prostitutes during the Second World War, primarily offering sexual services to Japanese soldiers. Many of the women were coerced into working as virtual sex slaves, while others may have worked on their own initiative, just as many women today still work in Japan’s sex industry. The issue of who ran the brothels aka “comfort houses” during the war was disputed for years but in 1992, Professor Yoshimi a well-known Japanese historian published Japanese archival documents that established the direct involvement of the Japanese military in running a network of military brothels known as “Comfort Houses.” The Japanese government also released over a hundred documents in the same year that supported the research."

The article continues, "The topic of the so-called comfort women is indeed embarrassing for Japan, however, in 1993, Yohei Kono, then Chief Cabinet secretary, issued a statement acknowledging that Japan organized during the war a brothel program for its military men, and offered an apology to Korea."

So the Japan government's official position is that these enslaved "comfort women" did exist. I believe there were also a number of Dutch women being forced to become "comfort women".

From various reports, Nikon has prohibited the photographer to talk with reporters inside the exhibit. To me, that's further infringement on the photographer's rights.

bgD300 wrote:

The photographer is free to display his photos where ever he wants so long as the chosen venue doesn't belong to someone.

You could show your pictures on the street outside my house but, I don't want you hanging them in my house.
Ni

The photographer has the right of free speech but, nobody has to by him a megaphone or listen to what he has to say.
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