Help Selecting Parts for a I7 3770 Build

Started May 26, 2012 | Discussions thread
zhir
New MemberPosts: 17
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Re: Nothing wrong with Ivy Bridge
In reply to lost_in_utah, Jun 1, 2012

I fully agree with him: this first batch of Ivybridge CPUs is more than just disappointing. I have been personally waiting a full year to upgrade my PC to 22nm, and now I am forced to wait even more until Intel fixes this internal thermal paste nightmare!

It has nothing to do with overclocking: when I buy a 22nm CPU, I expect it to produce much less heat than a 32nm part. Otherwise, I can just stick to a 32nm design, expecially for HTPC usage. The integrated HD4000 brings close to nothing.

It looks like changing the manufacturing process to 22nm and at the same time to "trigate" was a bad decision. In technical areas, it's usually better to change just one thing at a time. If they have manufacturing issues with Ivybridge, why don't they just recognize them and recall the chips?

This scandal reminds me of Intel's reaction in 1995 when the Pentium's FPU bug became public: "it only appears if you perform more than 1 million calculations in an Excel spreadsheet". Now we all know that it was a plain and simple bug in the FPU instructions, easy to reproduce and libraries were forced to include a workaround for it. It was fixed in the following releases of Pentium chips.

lost_in_utah wrote:

That is not true. The issue will remain whether you overclock or not, just not the same degree. You wouldn't worry about it, but everyone else should. It is a real issue.

Please don't suggest the user remove the IHS and reapply the thermal paste. No one is going to remove the IHS on a brand new $350 CPU.

The HD4000 isn't a deciding factor when discrete options can be purchased that are MUCH faster.

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