Canon EOS 5D Mark III review published

Started May 23, 2012 | Discussions thread
PicOne
Veteran MemberPosts: 6,510
Like?
Re: Nice job on tungsten High ISO comp with the D800
In reply to NektonFi, May 23, 2012

Are you forgetting that there is Aperture and Shutter speed to allow more light? I'm guessing you're speaking of specific handhold situations.

NektonFi wrote:

Of course they need to be pushed. When you raise the ISO, you push all channels. And with a filter, you need to push them even further because you're cutting away some light. Try yourself. I won't comment any further. Less light - more noise.

PicOne wrote:

No.. with a CC filter, you expose all three channels evenly and correctly, and no channel needs to be pushed. Without a CC filter, going from arctic cool to very warm tungsten, you will have one channel or other either needing strong pushes, or potentially overexposed.

NektonFi wrote:

Yes, then you would have to push all channels equally much. I don't know, but I seriously doubt the photos would be any better noisewise. Using a filter of any kind (especially a color filter) always takes some quantity of light away.

PicOne wrote:

A filter evens out the RGB response, so that no one channel has to be pushed as much. All of the shots you linked to could be taken with a tripod, and instead of adjusting ISO, adjusting shutter or aperture. My point though was actually with any camera, a color-correction filter can still be used in challenging lighting if one's interested in achieving the best possible results.

NektonFi wrote:

And how would a filter correct this issue? When you add a color filter, you actually do not add anything to the photo, but on the contrary, take something away. You filter some of the light. In the end, I think you'd need even higher ISO with a filter because you are cutting away some amount of the light that reaches the sensor.

PicOne wrote:

There is still value in color-correction filters; I think most think that WB sliders in raw converters can optimally solve for all lighting and that filters have no point.

Horshack wrote:

The tungsten High ISO comp between the 5DM3 and D800 is a good demonstration on why DxoMark scored the D800's High ISO composite score so much higher than the 5DM3's. If you recall, that DxoMark score incorporates not just the SNR for 5000K (or maybe 5500K) lighting but also a weighting for the sensor's color separation (CFA purity). Under 5000K lighting the CFA differences aren't so obvious unless you do a lot of color PP, but under tungsten where the blue channel has to be pushed significantly the CFA differences become much more apparent since the 5DM3's less-pure CFA requires greater amplification to achieve the same white balance as the D800.

Here's the review page where the two are compared:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canon-eos-5d-mark-iii/22

-- hide signature --

'Everything in photography boils down to what's sharp and what's fuzzy.'
-Gaylord Herron

-- hide signature --

'Everything in photography boils down to what's sharp and what's fuzzy.'
-Gaylord Herron

-- hide signature --

'Everything in photography boils down to what's sharp and what's fuzzy.'
-Gaylord Herron

-- hide signature --

'Everything in photography boils down to what's sharp and what's fuzzy.'
-Gaylord Herron

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Post (hide subjects)Posted by
(unknown member)
LOLNew
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow