Buy a D800, Change your life!

Started Apr 20, 2012 | Discussions thread
gdanmitchell
Veteran MemberPosts: 7,730
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Re: Buy a D800, Change your life!
In reply to carlk, Apr 23, 2012

carlk wrote:

No that's exactly what you were doing. I take pictures this way and I take pictures that way do you people who want cameras with better this and better that do the same? The fact is people WILL get better pictures with better tool when everything else is equal or else why we are here.

And did you see the irony that you are the one who throw out that strawman bs?

Actually, I didn't I argued directly with your point. I offered an analogy as a way of thinking about my point. Nothing ironic about that at all since the analogy was intended to fairly closely replicate the thinking at work in a photographic scenario but without the emotional baggage of photo gear in a photo gear forum. As you can see by rereading my post, the analogy was not offered as proof of anything, but instead as a thought experiment you could try with a goal of thinking more dispassionately about the core question that I had already addressed.

If you think the analogy is false, explain how - without picking around the edges.

Your additional reference to bovine excrement was nice touch, too.

As to your additional straw man argument that I believe the following...

"I take pictures this way and I take pictures that way do you people who want cameras with better this and better that do the same?

I don't believe that people "better do the same" as I do. I never wrote that and I don't believe it. (In fact, I often write that people have different photographic needs that they must understand before investing a lot of money in gear, and that understanding their own needs will make them much better shoppers.)

Taking a position on something, and even holding to that point of view (in the face of insults sometimes) is not telling people that they had "better do the same as I do." There is a difference between advocating and trying to explain a position and forcing others to agree. I'm not forcing anyone to do anything - how could I? - but I am trying to convince them of my point of view.

So, basically, that statement is more or less the opposite of my position. But, again, nice try.

The fact is people WILL get better pictures with better tool when everything else is equal or else why we are here.

Ah, here we get to the core issue, don't we. It is a fact that some very small percentage of people "will get better pictures with a better tool when everything else is equal or else why we are here." By which I think you mean that any improvement in the specifications of camera equipment will necessarily result in better photographs.

  • First, this may be the case in a few situations. When might it be true? Let's take a very skillful and careful photographer working from the tripod with highest quality lenses and excellent technique, who is also a very skillful post-processor and who regularly prints large enough to be pushing the upper boundaries of print quality from full-frame DSLRs. This person might well be able, if everything works out just right, to produce a print a few inches (seriously, do the math) larger along the edge to the extent that pixel density is the limiting factor in print size. Quite often it isn't, but I'll spare us all that discussion right now. (This is roughly speaking the type of photographer I am - I work in-house with a 24" wide printer.)

  • Second... this describes an extremely small fraction of full-frame DSLR purchasers. The majority may never make a print at all, and if they do it is either a letter-size or 13" x 19" print or they may send it out to a service. Mostly they share photographs electronically. Here, the increased MP count of the 36 MP camera, while not a detriment in any significant way, provides essentially no significant improvement (if any at all) in image quality for their purposes. In other words, the improvement in specifications does no "result in better photographs."

  • Third, even in those cases where it might result in an improvement - and this is the point I was trying to make earlier - there are a number of factors that argue against taking radical steps in order to achieve it. For example, if you are (as I am) heavily invested in Canon lenses and bodies that you would have to sell in order to switch to Nikon, you would reasonably ask a few question before "jumping ship." These might include whether you think it is reasonable to wait at least a few months to see what Canon has up its sleeve, whether or not your ability to make damn fine 24" x 36" prints with your current gear will be significantly enhanced by the switch, and how much it will cost.

So, there you are - hopefully a discussion of the facts or at least legitimate points of view on this topic.

Take care,

Dan

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