Tamron Angle of View blog

Tamron Angle of View blog

Inspiration and photo lessons from professional photographers and the Tamron technical team.

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Website: tamrontechstips.typepad.com/tamron_blog
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Dec 19
By André Costantini The key to freezing action is to use a fast shutter speed. This often means that you must use a wider open aperture... show more
By André Costantini The key to freezing action is to use a fast shutter speed. This often means that you must use a wider open aperture (such as F/2.8 or F/4) to be able to get the correct exposure. There... show less
Dec 12
By Ken Hubbard For me the most important filter I have in my camera bag is the circular polarizing filter, this is because of the many... show more
By Ken Hubbard For me the most important filter I have in my camera bag is the circular polarizing filter, this is because of the many uses this for this filter that can help enhance your images. First, and what... show less
Dec 03
By Rob Moody Most of the time, I like to make images in nature. Occasionally, I’ll make some portraits to test lenses right when I get... show more
By Rob Moody Most of the time, I like to make images in nature. Occasionally, I’ll make some portraits to test lenses right when I get them. In this case, I just opened my Tamron SP 70-200 VC USD lens... show less
Nov 20
By Rob Moody Sunrise and sunset images are usually compelling on their own, but adding a perfect copy of that scene reflected in a body... show more
By Rob Moody Sunrise and sunset images are usually compelling on their own, but adding a perfect copy of that scene reflected in a body of water takes it to the next level. When using a polarizer to enhance the... show less
Nov 08
By André Costantini Dusty or foggy air, combined with backlight, is a great lighting condition for silhouettes of people and other easy... show more
By André Costantini Dusty or foggy air, combined with backlight, is a great lighting condition for silhouettes of people and other easy to recognize subjects. This technique creates a mystical, dreamy feeling. In this case, I waited for the moment... show less
Oct 24
By Jeff Allen Firework photography isn’t just for patriotic holidays anymore. In addition to Independence Day, there are shows on New... show more
By Jeff Allen Firework photography isn’t just for patriotic holidays anymore. In addition to Independence Day, there are shows on New Year’s Eve, at fairs and carnivals, sports team championship celebrations and season openers, business or civic grand openings and... show less
Oct 11
By Jillian Bell Flowers are the most common macro subject. I use a 90mm or 180mm macro lens for the furthest working distance. Macro... show more
By Jillian Bell Flowers are the most common macro subject. I use a 90mm or 180mm macro lens for the furthest working distance. Macro photography is all about the parts of a whole that inspire you. When I find flowers,... show less
Oct 01
By Ken Hubbard One of the first steps to creating an interesting image for your audience is to work on pleasing compositions. The Rule of... show more
By Ken Hubbard One of the first steps to creating an interesting image for your audience is to work on pleasing compositions. The Rule of Thirds is one way to achieve this. The “rule” states that photos should be divided... show less
Sep 24
By Rob Moody Using White Balance (WB) setting to achieve the best sunrise and sunset images. Select Daylight (typically represented by... show more
By Rob Moody Using White Balance (WB) setting to achieve the best sunrise and sunset images. Select Daylight (typically represented by the sun icon) from your camera’s “White Balance” menu. The Daylight WB setting deciphers the colors of the particular... show less