Hands-on with the AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR

The new AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR is a compact, fixed-aperture F4 zoom designed for use on Nikon's new generation of FX format DSLRs. Smaller in all dimensions than its more costly F2.8 cousin, the slimmed-down $1400 lens has been long-awaited by Nikon users looking jealously at Canon's venerable EF 70-200mm f/4L IS  USM

Dpreview is at the Photo Plus Expo tradeshow in New York, and we were given an exclusive opportunity to get our hands on a pre-production sample of the new 70-200mm. Although we weren't able to save any images, we were able to get a feel for the handling, the AF speed, and the efficiency of the claimed 5-stop Vibration Reduction system.

Starting with the handling, the first thing that you notice when you pick up the new lens is how small it is, relative to Nikon's flagship F2.8 variant. Slimmer, lighter, and smaller in all dimensions, the new 70-200mm F4 is a genuinely portable optic, and in terms of handling, an ideal companion for one of Nikon's smaller FX DSLRs, like the D800/E or recently-announced D600. Something that's easy to miss in the spec-sheet is that the new lens has a filter thread of 67mm, compared to the more common 77mm on other high-end Nikon zooms. This makes it slightly but noticeably slimmer than Nikon's AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR zoom; compared to Canon's equivalent model, it's about the same size, but around 90g / 3.2oz heavier. There's no official word on exactly how weatherproof the new lens is, but there's the usual rubber gasket around the mount, which makes a water and dust-resistant seal between camera and lens.

On a D600, focusing feels all but instant (despite the insistence of Nikon reps that the sample we used was 'unfinished') and the zoom action is smooth and well-damped. Because all of the lens movement (focus and zooming) is internal, the lens' dimensions never change. 

The new AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR is comprised of 20 elements in 14 groups, and features a constant aperture of F4. Internal zoom and focus means that its length doesn't change when zooming or focusing, and the closest focusing distance is 1 meter. 

The tripod mount ring is an optional extra - yours for just $224.

Smaller in all dimensions than the more costly F2.8 70-200mm, the new F4 zoom is slimmer than the AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR and about half as long again. It features a 67mm filter thread, unlike the more standard (for high-end Nikkors) 77mm.  Mounted on a D600, the combination is  surprisingly compact and very well-balanced.

In common with several recent high-end Nikon lenses, the AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR features a Nano Crystal coated element, which should reduce flare and internal reflections. Although not as versatile in poor light as its 2.8 cousin, the new lens features an improved Vibration Reduction system which Nikon claims should be able to deliver up to 5 EV of stabilization, potentially allowing you to get sharp pictures at shutter speeds as low as 1/6 sec at 200mm. Although this can't do anything about subject movement, it should greatly expand the usability of the lens in marginal lighting conditions. 

We weren't able to save any images, but from a very quick test Nikon's claims of a 5-stop vibration reduction don't seem entirely unreasonable. At 200mm, hand-held, we were able to get consistently sharp results from shutter speeds at least as low as 1/15 sec, which matches the best lenses we've tested in the past. Impressive stuff, and we can't wait to get a production sample in our offices for full testing. 

Samples Gallery

The AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4 ED VR arrived in our Seattle office a few days ago and since then we've been shooting with it as much as possible. We've put together a gallery of 34 images, shot with the new lens mounted on the 36MP Nikon D800. As well as straight-from-the-camera JPEGs, we've also converted several Raw files, and have made 'to taste' adjustments for best results. We're hoping to review this lens in early 2013, but until then, here's a preview real-world samples gallery.  

AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4 ED VR Preview Samples - Published 5th December 2012

There are 34 images in the samples gallery. Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review), we do so in good faith, please don't abuse it.

Unless otherwise noted images taken with no particular settings at full resolution. A reduced size image (within 1024 x 1024 bounds) is provided to be more easily viewed in your browser. As always the original untouched image is available by clicking on this reduced image.

Comments

Total comments: 258
12
rubicon
By rubicon (Oct 25, 2012)

I'm mainly using prime lenses on my D700, but I have my 70 300Vr, for its longer focal length, however, I'd like to wait on true tests to deter man if I can use it and discard the 70 300.
I'm very happy to see a F4, lens in the line up besides existing versions.

0 upvotes
flbrit
By flbrit (Oct 25, 2012)

For my use it seems great.

I will consider trading in my VRII f2.8 depending how it tests on IQ mounted on the D800e compared to the 2.8. I am also interested to see how it takes TC's.

I will not be an early adopter

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Oct 25, 2012)

No way would I trade my 2.8 VRII for this.

F4 is too slow to be of much use really - I have no idea why they have picked that point as a good thing to go with. Nothing in my bag is slower than 2.8 and never will be.

1 upvote
raincoat
By raincoat (Oct 25, 2012)

It makes no sense to trade. But it makes a good match for the D600. Unlike Canon whose f4 users are all 1.6x, really f4 are designed for FX sensors and now we have a 'consumer' one in D600.

1 upvote
hikerdoc
By hikerdoc (Oct 25, 2012)

I will keep my 2.8. I would rather get rid of the 70-300 for this as a lighter (than the 2.8) travel 70-200. I also dislike the lens extension in zooming to telephoto with the 70-300!

0 upvotes
revio
By revio (Oct 26, 2012)

@MPA1:
Who expected you to trade your 2,8? Why even bother to say a word, when it´s not of any worth to folks who ARE indeed interested in this lens?
This lens simply is not made for you! It is made for those who crave a more compact thing and 'who do not want to move over to Canon'!!! Is that so hard to understand? Everybody doesn´t think *exactly* the same as you do, or have the exact same needs as you have.

It is quite clear to me that many have hesitated to go for Nikon for the simple reason Nikon have ´til now not offered this lens type. The Canon 70-200/4L is one of the absolutely best lenses available at a "earthly" price. (I did own one before switching to Olympus)
Very strange then, that when Nikon at last do release a competitor, they get complaints. It´s close to laughable. I say this not knowing how good this lens will show itself to be, but I do think Nikon have taken their measures so they safely can launch it and get a good business from having it in their line up.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Eric Hensel
By Eric Hensel (Oct 26, 2012)

"Nothing in my bag is slower than 2.8 and never will be."
You wear a Rolex,too?

1 upvote
camerashopminion
By camerashopminion (Oct 27, 2012)

@revio:
Pretty sure he was responding to the original post, wherein fibrit said he was considering swapping his f/2.8 for the f/4. All in all a pretty relevant response, surely?

0 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Oct 25, 2012)

I'm liking everything about this lens so far. Biggest issue for me will be the bokeh quality. Can this be a serious portrait lens in the way that the 70-200 f/2.8 is?

2 upvotes
nikoj
By nikoj (Oct 25, 2012)

As far as bokeh quality, I've searched for some sample images of the Canon's F4, and have liked what I came up with. My guess is that the Nikon will be as good or better. If you already have the 70-200 2.8, you can shoot it at f4 to get an idea too. I am very tempted, for the weight, size and MFD.. My only hesitation to trade the 70-200vr2 for this is how well this lens takes TC's compared to 2.8. Can't justify picking this one up to add to the 2.8

0 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Oct 25, 2012)

It's not a problem if you know what you're doing.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 25, 2012)

It's look absolutely gorgeous. A totally drool worthy. Looks exactly like a mini 70-200 2.8 VR II. This will be my next lens for sure as I travel quite a bit and the big boy is a wonderful lens can be overkill for certain applications. It's nice to see the lens mounted on the D600. Seems like a nice, compact and solid.

I've been thinking of buying the older 80-200 2.8 ED, but I think I'd rather have this lens. Thank you, Nikon and thanks DPR for the preview.

5 upvotes
Dan
By Dan (Oct 25, 2012)

It looks like it's missing something without the tripod collar mounted.

0 upvotes
hikerdoc
By hikerdoc (Oct 25, 2012)

i would prefer and wait for the eventual RRS or Kirk collar which would mate directly to the ballhead.

2 upvotes
fireplace33
By fireplace33 (Oct 25, 2012)

I see lots of comparisons to the 70-200 2.8 but hardly any comparisons to the 70-300 VR (which has F4.5 - 5.3 in the 70-200 range)
Any good reason for me to get this new one if I already have the 70-300?
What sort of improvement could be expected?

1 upvote
Dan
By Dan (Oct 25, 2012)

Better VR
minimum focusing distance of 70-200 F4 is 3.28 ft vs 4.9 for the 70-300

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 25, 2012)

Constant f4 aperture. Better build quality and handling because of tripod collar. The downside is it will be heavier.

3 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Oct 25, 2012)

The other downside is the enormous difference in price versus the 70-300. But I'm sure it will be sharper.

0 upvotes
JustSomeDude
By JustSomeDude (Oct 26, 2012)

My 70-300mm VR extends on zooming, is soft past 200mm, changes exposure as you zoom, and is generally cheap-ish/plastic-y feeling.

I'll be selling mine on fleabay in short order -- along with a lot of other people, I'm sure! If the 70-300 suits your needs, you should be able to pick up a used copy for a very good price.

1 upvote
JustSomeDude
By JustSomeDude (Oct 26, 2012)

@fireplace33 My bad, you said you already had the 70-300, not that you'd be looking for one.

0 upvotes
Thomas Kachadurian
By Thomas Kachadurian (Oct 25, 2012)

It may be just me, but it looks exactly like a Canon 70-200 f4. This is not a bad thing, the Canon lens is my go to for about 70% of my work. You Nikon guys are going to love having it.

12 upvotes
oselimg
By oselimg (Oct 25, 2012)

What did you expect it to look like???? it's a 70-200 F4 with round shape glass and made in this world. On a more serious note it is not a design with Diffractive optics either so it's still round and as long as it has got to be. Also the Canon version is in beige/white and appears to be slightly slimmer-a minor detail overlooked maybe. But well done you appear to have a nice piece of Canon optics. I wander how you chose it an what you do with it.....

5 upvotes
Richard G T
By Richard G T (Oct 25, 2012)

Where's my mid-range Nikon 50-150 f/2.8 for DX??? Been waiting years for it but Nikon throws out another 70-200 full frame lens. I'm sure many will be happy with this lens but I want a DX! At f/2.8 with VR it would be faster and probablly smaller than this lens. Still waiting.....

3 upvotes
motobloat
By motobloat (Oct 25, 2012)

It's made in Japan by a company called Sigma, and it costs $999.

It's not small though - stabilization elements add a lot of heft to telephoto lenses (or if they are small, then they add a lot of vignetting and wreck image quality in the corners, e.g. Tamron 17-50 VC).

Stop waiting around for slowpoke Nikon - they don't really care about making new DX lenses besides slow kit zooms. Third party lenses, or leaving Nikon altogether, are your only options.

2 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Oct 25, 2012)

I wouldn't mind a compact 50-150 f/2.8 full frame Nikkor, with Nanocoating. Probably would use that lens a lot.

1 upvote
motobloat
By motobloat (Oct 25, 2012)

Interesting that Nikon put this lens out before updating all of the older stuff that needs a refresh (300 f/4, 80-400, 17-35 f/2.8, 17-55 f/2.8, 200mm macro, 180mm f/2.8, etc. etc.).

I guess they've gotta get some more mid-tier FX lenses out for people to use with the D600. But why? If you're paying up for an FX sensor and its extra stop of thinner DOF, then why put f/4 lenses on it?

It would be cheaper to just buy f/2.8 glass and DX bodies - same DOF control as f/4 on FX, but faster shutter speeds due to the larger aperture.

I wonder if anyone will buy this thing...

3 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 25, 2012)

they will sell a ton of them. you forget that you have to deal with a narrower angle of view with that logic. often not desirable. sometimes is

2 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (Oct 25, 2012)

Nikon doesn't make a DX 50-135mm f/2.8. This has annoyed me for a long time. However, Sigma makes an absolutely stunning 50-150 mm f/2.8 OS, sharp corner to corner at f/2.8 across the entire range, and costs less than the new Nikkor 70-200 mm f/4.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 55 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 25, 2012)

also you are assuming that someone only has one lens. they may have this and a few primes plus a 24-70 2.8 it depends what is important to them

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 25, 2012)

What your missing is the size. Having used the Canon equivalent, such a lens is extremely manageable, but it provides most of the performance characteristics of the f2.8 lens. It's a great choice for outdoor photographers out in the field where weight is always a concern and the improved VR will make is extremely desirable for a wide range of applications including video shooters.

Not only will people buy this lens, myself included, but Nikon will sell boatloads of this lens. Canon's version is one of their most popular lenses and there will be tons of interest for Nikon users.

@viking79 For a DX Nature photographer, this new Nikon will be much more interesting than the 50-150 2.8. It will be like the Sigma 100-300 f4 on FF, but smaller and with VR.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
mgblack74
By mgblack74 (Oct 25, 2012)

Interesting they put out a 70-200 f/4 before 'refreshing' others? Because there is no modern 70-200 f/4 maybe.

1 upvote
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 25, 2012)

so as a portrait photographer i look at this lens and wonder if i would be happy with the amount of subject seperation I got with it. Light wise on my d800 f 4 should be fine. I have a sigma hsm 2 70-200 f2.8 and I am planning to purchase the nikkor or the new tamron that is coming out in the next year depending on if the new tamrons performance is as impressive as the new tamron 24-70. The OS version of the sigma i have is unfortunately not sharp (stange since its predecessor was). I want to consider this as well but I have always relied on my 70-200 as the ultimate bokeh lens and I fear f/4 may not cut it all the time espeacially if the background is close to the subject. The current lens witch i generally shoot these type of shots at f/2.8 can out bokeh my 85mm nikkor prime. I guess the real way to get an answer on this is to throw some f/4 shots into portrait sessions and see how it looks. I wonder what you all think though

0 upvotes
Dan
By Dan (Oct 25, 2012)

I'm sure it's POSSIBLE to get excellent background separation using this F4 lens (or any other lens for that matter) BUT then why do people use the 200mm F2? Why 85mm F1.4? I use my 70-200 F2.8 for portraits, so I say NO to F4. I refuse to "settle."

And I don't say this based on nothing either. When I close the aperture one stop, I can see a significant increase in DOF.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
George E620
By George E620 (Oct 25, 2012)

Yes. For example:
85mm F/2.8 at 5' gives FF portrait width of 2.1' and std dof of 2"
85mm F/4 at 5' gives portrait with of 2.1' and dof of 2.9"(almost 50% more in this example).

0 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Oct 25, 2012)

@Dan that's a very narrow minded view that portraits can only be shot with the widest apeture possible on a lens. Have you actually had experience to shoot portraits at smaller-than-wide-open apetures, because believe me its done quite often and to good effect.

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 25, 2012)

@kayone to be fair he was responding to my direct question as to weather id be happy with the level of subject seperation.

2 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Oct 26, 2012)

If you want subject separation, for portraits the best choice is still the Nikkor f/2 135DC. That whole extra stop makes a big difference in depth of field. Plus it was designed as a portrait lens. Rent one and you'll never go back.

0 upvotes
Dan
By Dan (Oct 26, 2012)

Kayone, I did not say that all portraits must be shot with a lens wide-open.

0 upvotes
Dan
By Dan (Oct 26, 2012)

But since you brought that up, could please you tell me why one would want to stop-down a lens other than for increased sharpness (or other IQ related issues) or to get more of the subject or background in-focus?

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 27, 2012)

@rfsIII yeah but s 70-200 is something I use 2000 situations besides just that. I use 85mm f/1.8 (witch is a freaking masterpiece for the money) as my goto portrait prime. In my opinion it is more versatile as well. a 135 f/2 just sound like a lens i will only use occasionally

0 upvotes
FrankS009
By FrankS009 (Oct 25, 2012)

Small? Light? Compared to the 2.8 you say. Specs please. And how about a size and weight comparison to Panasonic's new 35-100 2.8 for 4/3rds.

2 upvotes
brunobarolo
By brunobarolo (Oct 25, 2012)

Why not compare size and weight to a 140-400mm zoom for a 6x7cm medium format camera?

6 upvotes
the reason
By the reason (Oct 25, 2012)

I agree frank, this is very far from compact. Im also very surprised by the quality of the newer m4/3s bodies, it is very far from what the people claim it is (I suspect theyve never shot with one) and the new lenses are becoming a very strong reason to jump ship entirely.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

Specs were published in yesterday's news story, and are widely available on the web. This is a quick writeup of my experience of handling the lens for less than half an hour, this morning.

3 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 25, 2012)

It's 3.1 x 7.0" (7.87 x 17.78 cm), weighs 1.87 lb (.85 kg), has 3 ED elements, a 9-blade diaphragm and a removable tripod collar.

The Panasonic 35-100 2.8 is tiny compared to this lens with it's 58mm filter thread, 4" (10 cm) long barrel and 12.7 oz (360 g) weight.

But not only is the Panasonic, at $1499, more expensive than the Nikkor, it only covers m43 sensor, so it's not really fair comparison. Build quality if the Nikon lens is likely way more solid than the Panasonic lens. I have both types of cameras, but I'd much rather have the Nikon 70-200 f4.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
BJN
By BJN (Oct 25, 2012)

But that small and light Panny lens only works with small and "light" (in relative performance) MFT sensors. I have both MFT and Nikon FX systems and the "equivalent" setups aren't equal.

1 upvote
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Oct 25, 2012)

Hmm FF x m43, not even close ...

1 upvote
FrankS009
By FrankS009 (Oct 25, 2012)

Perhaps Mr. Britton is or will be able to provide objective comparisons of build quality and IQ between this lens and the Panasonic 35-100mm 2.8 in due course.

As far as personal preference is concerned, to each his or her own about what kind of system they use (and carry around) - 4/3rds, Full frame or medium format. I denigrate none.

Personally, 4/3rds image quality is as good as I need in practical terms, and 4/3rd lenses such as the 35-100m are as big as I want to lug around.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Oct 25, 2012)

Comparing a full frame dSLR telephoto lens in size and weight to a MFT telephoto (I own an OM-D in addition to the D600) is a pretty stupid comparison. Your question should be comparision this f4 in size and weight to a 70-200 f2.8 dSLR telephoto lens.

2 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Oct 26, 2012)

No, it's a perfectly good comparison.

0 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Oct 26, 2012)

I know you're being sarcastic, but I'll pretend you're being serious and respond accordingly: I gotta disagree, why compare the relative size and weight of equivalent telephoto lenses from two different camera systems, where the Nikon dSLRs are much larger than the MFT bodies. That's like comparing a child's shoe to an adult shoe because the wearers are completely different sizes. Kind of pointless.

0 upvotes
the reason
By the reason (Oct 28, 2012)

because the fact remains its f4, and the mayority of people are gonna slap it on an APS C nikon and not a full frame. In that regard its f4, not weather sealed, and Im betting its plastic. If you really prefer a plastic non weather sealed f4 lens for your APS C than a weather sealed, metal, and f2.8 for m4/3s, and for more or less the same price something is wrong with you.

0 upvotes
em_dee_aitch
By em_dee_aitch (Oct 25, 2012)

Can you DEFINITIVELY say whether or not it is weather sealed??? This is a huge question, and you are REMISS to not answer it, having handled the actual lens! I will note that Nikon spec sheets can no longer be relied upon, because they are no longer listing weather seals as a feature for multiple lenses that DO have it, including the 70-200/2.8G VR2. Please answer this question.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 25, 2012)

I BELIEVE all the gold ring lenses have it but dont quote me on it

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

calm down - no confirmed word on weather-sealing, but I can say that as expected, there's the usual rubber gasket around the mount, which makes a water and dust-resistant seal between camera and lens.

3 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Oct 25, 2012)

@Kodachrome200 - Not necessarily, the Nikkor 24-120 f/4 has the gold ring but does not offer substantial weather sealing along the lines of the f/2.8 gold ring zooms.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Oct 25, 2012)

This thing about weather-sealing is overrated. I have used the D7k with the 12-24 in very wet weather w/o any problems.

3 upvotes
nikoj
By nikoj (Oct 25, 2012)

Weather sealed? Metal or polycarbonate barrel?

2 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (Oct 25, 2012)

Read specs instead of asking dumb questions.
Polycarbonate and no wather sealing.

3 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 25, 2012)

Nowhere do any of the specs around the web say anything about polycarbonate or weather sealing and nikoj is not the first to ask this this so I'm not sure why your on his back. It's a perfectly valid question.

3 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Oct 25, 2012)

Made in Japan for $1400?

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Oct 25, 2012)

Not only is it a valid question, it’s the kind of stuff that should be in a press release, but rarely is, and should be in a ‘hands-on’ write-up, but rarely is.

AbrasiveReducer: it’s made in Thailand. Not that it matters (except for maximising shareholder value?).

0 upvotes
Peter_H_77
By Peter_H_77 (Oct 25, 2012)

DPR - do you mean the more common 77mm on other high-end Nikon zooms? Not 72mm? Just being picky......

2 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Oct 25, 2012)

They have both 72mm and 77mm lenses, but 77 is more common. I've corrected it.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

Thanks - yes, that was an error. I meant 77mm.

1 upvote
aardvark7
By aardvark7 (Oct 25, 2012)

Sorry, but I don't get this idea of 'You can handle it but can't save the images" nonsense.

The result is one can say it is a lens that weighs as much as it says it weighs, it is as big as it states it is big, and it might perform as they claim it could...you don't say???!!!??

Either the manufacturers want to show their new product or they don't. Why all this tip-toeing around I have no idea. It is a waste of everyone's time.

I suspect that this lens will be a great lens, but please, DPR, tell all these companies to take a running jump unless they have something useful to demonstrate.

6 upvotes
wolfb
By wolfb (Oct 25, 2012)

Those were my first thoughts exactly. Talking about quick focus and not being able to save a picture...Highly suspect. There must be some agreement with Nikon not to show pix until the initial hype has cooled down amd they have gotten all the pree relaese publicity they can. And not to include a MSRP but quote the price of the tripid mount ring....Hummm.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

We're of the opinion that some quick handling/speed comments and a few extra images are better than nothing, which is what you would have got had we done what you said. I'm not going to turn down access to a close-to-final sample camera or lens, it would be ridiculous.

10 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

@ wolfb - your comment hardly deserves a response, but anyway if you read the article you'll see that I handled a pre production lens. We do not publish samples from unfinished products except in very unusual cases.

7 upvotes
aardvark7
By aardvark7 (Oct 25, 2012)

To Mr. Britton,

I don't mean to be argumentative and please don't take this to be in any way aggressive, but why are 'some comments and a few pictures' better than nothing?

In terms of relevance to those interested in buying this won't assist in any way.

It may be that one instinctively feels such articles are of value, but that is entirely different from the reality, which you must see, surely?

Certainly, being within the trade, I would expect you to jump at the chance of having a first hand look at the lens, but please don't imagine that this is anything other than filling column inches and pandering to a manufacturer.

Even though your comments are positive, they are still no different to the advertising blurb. Until you can show visitors the results and say, "Here are some shots that we've taken. They look fantastic and the lens reaches our best expectations", it dilutes the whole essence of the site, in my opinion.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Oct 25, 2012)

The version they tested isn't final design, so of course Nikon doesn't want photos shown yet.

3 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 25, 2012)

I'm extremely happy to see photos of the lens mounted on a D600. It's extremely helpful.

As far as samples, at this level, there are very few poor performing Nikkors, so if it's in the focal length that you need, it likely a safe bet.

If this preview is not useful to you, nobody is making you click through. I don't know why people feel they are owed something from everybody. This lens was just announced, when it starts shipping there wil be boatloads of samples.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
aardvark7
By aardvark7 (Oct 26, 2012)

To HiRez,

My curiosity is if the lens is not finished, why show it at all and if there is nothing to show for DPR, why write an article?

The strange thing is that recently Nikon showed the D600 and it was in the shops in days, whereas Sony show the A99 and it has only just started shipping and Canon have the 6D which is yet to appear at all. I simply don't see the reasoning behind these 'non-announcements'.

To marike6,

Don't take this the wrong way, but I am very interested as to why you find a picture of this on a D600 to be 'extremely helpful'?

Given that your second point is accurate then you would never need to see a picture before ordering, surely.

Finally, you have to click to read the preview before determinng the worth. I merely pointed out that they have said or shown anything that the earlier announcement did not.

0 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Oct 26, 2012)

@aardvark7 - Because I think it is useful to see what the handling characteristics are like. Is is big, small, heavy, light, etc.? I mean hey, it's a preview, we're not going to get a full review yet, but I personally don't mind getting some details as they are available. Obviously I want to see some full reviews and sample photos before I buy it, but it's good to know some general things in advance.

1 upvote
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Oct 26, 2012)

This is just like the olden days of newspapers when they would put out several editions a day as the news developed. You add information to the story as you get it so readers learn about it the same time you do. The alternative is to wait till you get the whole story and that could leave us readers waiting a mighty long time. I prefer the bulletin approach of this site.

1 upvote
Waterengineer
By Waterengineer (Oct 25, 2012)

Nikon showing the lens with the optional collar/foot is sort of false advertising, IMHO.

3 upvotes
EmmanuelStarchild
By EmmanuelStarchild (Oct 25, 2012)

It clearly states it can be yours for "just" $224. Wow, what a bargain.

4 upvotes
wint
By wint (Oct 25, 2012)

When will be avaible in the stores?

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

Next month, hopefully (I am told).

0 upvotes
Doug
By Doug (Oct 25, 2012)

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-Tripod-Mount-Ring-A-II-Review.aspx I think Canon has a white t/pod ring

0 upvotes
JustSomeDude
By JustSomeDude (Oct 26, 2012)

Canon has both a newer white tripod ring and an older black tripod ring that fit their 70-200 f/4 lenses.

1 upvote
VivaLasVegas
By VivaLasVegas (Oct 25, 2012)

Hey DPR staff, do you have a photo with the lense hood on it? Maybe the lense hood is built into the Nano coatings.

3 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

Sorry, I shot the lens as it was given to me. Hoodless.

0 upvotes
EmmanuelStarchild
By EmmanuelStarchild (Oct 25, 2012)

Still waiting for those lens reviews you promised on Oct. 2

5 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Oct 25, 2012)

i dont want to be a douche about it but i want to plus 1 this

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2012)

Soon. No-one wants 'em on the site more than me.

5 upvotes
EmmanuelStarchild
By EmmanuelStarchild (Oct 25, 2012)

Cool, thanks. :-)

0 upvotes
pitaw
By pitaw (Oct 25, 2012)

I think this lens is a glorified 70-300 mm vr nikkor that I love and cost me a lot lot less...we'll see.

1 upvote
LarryK
By LarryK (Oct 25, 2012)

It'll have to perform better than that if it's keeping pace with the Canon.

4 upvotes
ImagesInstyle
By ImagesInstyle (Oct 25, 2012)

About time nikon. i was getting tired of lusting after canons 70-200mm f4.
now stop playin, and include the tripod ring, and were all good.

0 upvotes
rockjano
By rockjano (Oct 25, 2012)

Don't worry chinese manufacturers will make one for you for $20-30

5 upvotes
Thomas Kachadurian
By Thomas Kachadurian (Oct 25, 2012)

Canon Doesn't include it either. But don't worry about it. I only use my Tripod collar on rare occasions on my 70-200 f4 but I always use on the 70-200 f2.8. This is a much smaller lens that handles more like a 135mm prime.

1 upvote
BJN
By BJN (Oct 25, 2012)

Handling has nothing to do with the need for a tripod collar. It's still a 200mm lens and it's a stop slower. I suppose the one saving grace of having the collar be an accessory is that the aftermarket collars will all be better than Nikon's own - and they'll include an Arca type dovetail.

0 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Oct 25, 2012)

Most of us who shoot sports, action, weddings with a 70-200 lens aren't doing it on a tripod, so this need for a tripod collar ring is largely irrelevant, especially for a lighter weight lens. yes there are monopods, but I hardly use mine is this situations either.

2 upvotes
gordon lafleur
By gordon lafleur (Oct 26, 2012)

I agree about the tripod collar stuff, I have an aftermarket one for my Canon f4, but have never used it in the two years I've had it.

0 upvotes
Entracte
By Entracte (Oct 25, 2012)

sweet! sweet!, santa Nikon woo woo santa Nikon !

2 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (Oct 25, 2012)

Are kids alowed to be up this hour ?
Go back to sleep, it's a school day tomorow and you have not eaten your veggies.

11 upvotes
Entracte
By Entracte (Oct 26, 2012)

Ok mum !

0 upvotes
Joseph
By Joseph (Dec 10, 2012)

I'm waiting for the Tokina 70-200 f4 w/ their own "IS" and "AF-S" implementation. I guess I will wait until both lenses are shipped and reviewed.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 258
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