A Serious Rangefinder Compact Camera

 The Conceptual Nikon C1

What do we all want but cannot have? Yes, we all know what it is. That perfect camera. And for sure, we all know that it needs to be the smallest, lightest camera, that has every conceivable manual control on the outside, that has a zoom that goes from 10 to 1000mm but is only 2 inches long and has a constant aperture of f/1.2, is silent, unobtrusive and gives us the sort of photographic freedom to compose our shots using an interface that harks back to the age of classic film cameras, done with minimum fuss, total control, and using all the very latest digital innovation that can be thrown at it.

I guess we will be waiting a while...

In the meantime, I figured I would design my own. And what would one do when they have something that just might be either highly acclaimed, or highly criticized, that could easily contain enough unique design elements that would sensibly be better patented before showing a soul, or so poorly conceived to not even be worth discussing over coffee? I figured life is too short for such delusions of success, or fear of total ridicule and failure, and the only thing left would be to get the dream out of my silly head and into the world, where we can let the chips fall where they may.

And so, I have attached the ‘brochure’ for what would be a camera I personally would like to carry around. Meet the Nikon C1. It could easily be a Canon, Fujifilm or Leica, but as I am familiar with Nikon, that’s the way I went. I hope, in a society where litigation can be thrown around for just using a design element as simple as a square with rounded-corners, none of these companies hold it against me in any way regarding the reckless indulging of my fantasies. It is not my intent to hurt. And I should say, my drawing skills are rather limited, although you may be interested to know all of this was done using MS Word drawing tools... amazing what one can achieve by pressing lots of buttons and clicking away until something resembling more than a cartoon style sketch done on the back of a napkin is created. The purists out there will together I am sure find solidarity in cursing my primitive rendition, but I do hope those that look to understand concepts rather than realism will “get the idea”...

The design is somewhat unashamedly influenced by what I think most will agree was one of those classic iconic SLRs, and let’s be clear on this, definitely my favourite camera, the Nikon F4s, albeit transposed here to digital and made somewhat more compact, roughly a centimetre taller than a Nikon Coolpix P7100, and two centimetres wider. The proportions of everything on the camera may not quite match reality or even technical possibility - that is the good thing about designing a dream; one can flirt with physics. Who knows exactly how that grip should really feel, what the best sensor should be. And yes, the lens is rather a hopeful fictitious desire more than anything, hoping at least for anything that is state of the art optically so as to achieve some classic shallow depth of field. Whether it should be fixed, zoom or interchangeable, it is all open to suggestion. Dream on is what I say...

 Design Specifications

I am not sure what this article should say or not, and maybe it could be of no interest to anyone, but perhaps my only real hope is that maybe, if we all talk more about what we want, it gets the word out to those great camera manufacturers out there, and then, someone will one day build it, or something like it, and I will finally be able to hold the ‘one’ in my hands every day, at every moment.

I hope it stimulates some thoughts.

Nikon C1

Design Specifications

  • Classic analogue camera controls for Mode, Shutter Speed, Aperture, Exposure Compensation, and ISO, plus selection dials for Focus Area, Focus Servo, Drive,  Metering and White Balance modes
  • Front command and rear command dial allow contemporary digital camera adjustment of settings
  • Classic range-finder type finder, with zoom coupling, that displays essential shooting information, such as Shooting Mode, Shutter Speed, Aperture, Focus Lock, Exposure Compensation, and Flash information
  • Contoured front-grip allowing superb handling when operating top and front-mounted controls with right-hand
  • Camera has side-access to dual-SD card slots, Video Out, External Mic In, and Flash Sync sockets, all under rubberized cover, with the battery and tripod-mount socket accessed on the bottom side.
  • Three user-definable FN function buttons ,  plus push and select buttons for Flash Mode and Compensation
  • All classic controls have a unique innovative feature, whereby, when the small square symbol is selected, the internal camera setting for that dial is used, which can be chosen from an expanded range of menu-selectable settings
  • Digital controls for Playback, Delete, Menu, Lock, Zoom (using rear command dial), Image Quality and Bracket settings
  • All external controls are dust and weatherproof
  • The Info button displays a summary of all current settings on the LCD display, and when held-in will back-light all external control labels
  • Rear grip sculptured to allow good handling while operating AF button, rear command dial and four-way controller
  • Sculptured shape that allows the left hand to support the camera while operating lens rings
  • Buttons for LCD display mode and instant image voice-memo tagging
  • Large controls with tactile feedback, with position sensed easily by touch
  • Fine tuning of shutter speed to +/- one-third of a stop
  • Instant video start button and classic threaded shutter-release button, plus Off-On-Lock dial, where the Lock feature enables camera controls specified by user to be locked, avoiding accidental activation
  • Lens is an ultra-fast 24-105 zoom, with aperture, zoom and manual focus rings, with switchable Vibration Reduction control

Nikon C1

Innovative

Inspired

Irresistible

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 136
12
WatchFan1
By WatchFan1 (Oct 28, 2012)

Easycass, really a great effort !! I'd buy it in a second !!

0 upvotes
Easycass
By Easycass (Oct 31, 2012)

Yes, maybe a few tweaks here and there, perhaps even less digital cntrols would be better, and yes, maybe someone can make it a bit more beautiful, but honestly, if I had something like it, I am sure I would rarely put it down... we all continue to dream.

0 upvotes
Easycass
By Easycass (Oct 24, 2012)

Let us first agree that this design concept is not going to suit every in. I if you need simplicity, prefer to use purely contemporary digital controls, prefer composing using the LCD screen, or like something more beautiful rather than functional, non of this will make sense.

The idea here is to show a hybrid layout that 'might', be workable, and where for sure some layout changes would be very possible. But so long as the end result allowed the photographer to:

1. Operate all photo taking controls by feel with camera to the eye and with little change in grip.
2. Give a minimum set of digital layout to allow contemporary digital control.
3. More compact than SLR.

Satisfy all above, and I'd sleep with the thing.

0 upvotes
Easycass
By Easycass (Oct 24, 2012)

As this concept actually talks about control layout, one thing I have avoided mentioning are the requirements of the camera's 'photographic capability'.

So let me add the most important aspect that seems to missing from most compacts these days, covering the spec list of sensor design, lens focal length, image circle, depth of field, and size: -

The camera should either have interchangeable lenses or a short focal length zoom that gives enough optical control combined with aperture to separate foreground from mid and background objects with a smooth out of focus bokeh.

Yes, this for me is actually the most important 'control' of any camera: artistic control.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Keith Hatfull
By Keith Hatfull (Oct 24, 2012)

Apparently the concept of a concept is lost on a good percentage of photographers.

That said I'd buy one of these in a New York minute.

The inclusion of a position on all manual controls that enables electronic controls is inspired.

Of course, I shoot a Pentax K-5 with manual A lenses with AF confirm and beeps turned off. So I'm already getting as close to this concept as I can get. I suspect Easycass would approve :)

Oh, and don't make the damned thing too small! :)

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Easycass
By Easycass (Oct 24, 2012)

Yes, in fact I really like the Pentax K-5, small but not too small, good control layout, can do most things with the camera held the eye, and combined with some of the very compact lenses, it really is a camera you just can't help but use... Good choice.

0 upvotes
Easycass
By Easycass (Oct 24, 2012)

Not worth biting too hard on some of the people whoimagined not much thought went intothis, but there are a few things that perhaps cannot be readily seen. If you count the numer of analogue controls, the bits that control the actual photographic taking part of the camera, the number of controls are very similar to any pro film camera made in the 90's; just take a look at an F4... Nikon always designs their pro camers to allow adjustment of basic shooting paramters without, moving the right hand... But, on the F4 forexample, the metering was on the finder and required you to take one hand out of position to operate. This now sits just under the fingers of the right hand, where no change of grip is needed. The shutter speed and compensation again are operated by the thumb here, again not requiring the moving of one's shutter finger. The focus control is where it is on most Nikons, even today. All other analogue control dials are in similar positions to other pro-level film cameras...

0 upvotes
Leo LS
By Leo LS (Oct 24, 2012)

Every dial for USD100 or 200, then the cost will be . . .

0 upvotes
KZMike
By KZMike (Oct 23, 2012)

I don't perceive this exercise is how pretty we can make a camera, but rather how/what we'd want a camera to function/perform in the 'real' world. If the only comment we make is aesthetics based, then we've missed the point of this huge effort.

One can easily see there has be a ton of thought, work and effort here and that should be welcomed here. . . THANKS

The only 'missing' wish list item I would add is a tilting/articulating screen on the back.

0 upvotes
WellyNZ
By WellyNZ (Oct 24, 2012)

A ton of thought? I don't think it took a ton of thought to add every single manual control onto a camera that they possibly could. If it took a ton of thought, it wouldn't look anything like this.

0 upvotes
KZMike
By KZMike (Oct 29, 2012)

Try doing this yourself and you'd change your mind. . . what buttons to add, where to place them, size of button and how they work together. . . then put it all together with all the other variables.

If you've ever 'designed' ANYTHING you'd not be saying what you have. It is oh so easy to criticize. . . not so easy to do

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
daniel s9999
By daniel s9999 (Oct 23, 2012)

Gee, this thing looks ugly.

1 upvote
bwabl
By bwabl (Oct 23, 2012)

Add a cellular phone... For the younger people offcourse.

0 upvotes
WellyNZ
By WellyNZ (Oct 23, 2012)

I think there's still some room for more buttons and dials on the grip. And maybe make the screen touch sensitive to fit more buttons on it.

In all seriousness, I'm glad the person who designed this isn't a product designer. This is possibly the most ugly and cluttered camera prototype I've ever seen in my life.

4 upvotes
Graystar
By Graystar (Oct 23, 2012)

Looks like a camera for old people who are unable to push a button and spin a dial at the same time.

Pass.

0 upvotes
Dan Tong
By Dan Tong (Oct 22, 2012)

Easycass,

Nicely done with some great ideas.

Thanks,

Dan

1 upvote
ohrdio
By ohrdio (Oct 22, 2012)

Excellent effort!
I particularly like the fact that the lens has an aperture ring with an A setting to go to S-priority, and likewise the A on the Shutter speed wheel to select A-priority.
Bring back the good old D-type lenses with aperture functionality on the lens where you have your left hand.
Oh yes, and the camera needs to be FX for all the good FX lenses.

1 upvote
slickjc
By slickjc (Oct 22, 2012)

add water proof to 100 ft .

1 upvote
astigmate
By astigmate (Oct 22, 2012)

Nice PS job, and the "all manuals controls" is great.

But, the perfect camera for me is the one who has the (mostly) perfect sensor.

I'd like nikon focus more on this and being creative ! A mix of the D600's sensor for noise SNR and dynamic and a foveon like structure. This, I would buy without hesitation.

1 upvote
villagranvicent
By villagranvicent (Oct 22, 2012)

I love it and I think is a great creative effort... I agree, the control dials on the front make little sense and would be easy to accidentally switch between AF, or MF without knowing it, but the whole concept is very worthy... I guess my perfect real-life camera would be a Fuji X-Pro1 with full frame sensor simply because I love extreme DoF shallowness.

Congratulations and thanks for sharing!

0 upvotes
Doug Bale
By Doug Bale (Oct 22, 2012)

While we're at it — this may be tempting a whole different discussion — I'd suggest that given today's technology the perfect device for focus control is no longer a dial around the lens, but a pressure-sensitive slider. A tap would turn it on, after which nudges forward or back would take you to wide angle or tele at a rate dependent on how hard you nudged it or for how long; steady pressure, as opposed to a light flick, would take you immediately to one extreme or the other.
To prevent focus being changed accidentally, the control would deactivate after a second or so, till the next tap. The interval between tap and deactivation would have to be programmable. And of course you'd want to be able to have the whole control deactivated in favour of auto-focus.

0 upvotes
Doug Bale
By Doug Bale (Oct 22, 2012)

The model proposed is big for my taste. Perfection for me would combine the R100’s full-frame sensor with the S110’s size and focal reach and the LX7’s brightness at the long end. I should think that we're not far from seeing that synthesis. Besides these, the perfect camera would need controls constantly under the user's fingers for four essential factors: aperture, shutter, ASA and focus. One shouldn't need to take the camera away from one's eye to adjust any of those.
Also, my perfect camera's shutter would be wirelessly controllable. Of the three cameras cited above, only the S110 appears to have any sort of remote control capability, and it's not wireless. Instead of something the size of a salami and a tangle of wires, I want something like Apple's TV remote.

0 upvotes
obeythebeagle
By obeythebeagle (Oct 22, 2012)

Fantastic job, and what an effort! I was a copywriter for eight years for a leading camera company, and your work on this is monumental. Your thought process makes great sense.

My problem (like everyone else) is I want too many cameras with specific functions.

Take the sensor from the Nikon 800 and put it in the Sony R1, only the sensor should be upgraded to a 36 megapixel Merrill Foven. Take the glass from the new Panasonic mega zoom that offers a 28-600 lens with constant 2.8 aperture and I would be most happy. Of course I realize the lens would be a challenge to adapt to full-frame, and would require a collaboration that would result in a new company...Carl Leitz! On second thought, the lens needs to be at least 24-600.

0 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Oct 22, 2012)

Wow, I didn't know a kid can create something that ugly. >.<

5 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Oct 22, 2012)

Somehow reminds another horribly ugly design that actually came out of Nikon factory.

0 upvotes
Tim Streater
By Tim Streater (Oct 22, 2012)

What is a "rage-finder"? (classic or not).

I like having many buttons and dials. Saves having to dive into too many menus. I would check, however, that the left hand is not gripping (and potentially moving) a number of the controls on the left side of the camera. It looks to me like the left hand fingers would be covering the flash, the motor drive control, and the autofocus control.

An eye-level viewfinder is a must (but can be EVF if that is good enough).

Two other things: the camera must be large enough to grip properly, but it must *not* be heavy. I don't understand why a full-frame film camera (90s and before) weighs so much less than even an APS-C DSLR of today. Weight should be 400gm or so.

0 upvotes
dfstarman
By dfstarman (Oct 22, 2012)

An nex-7 size camera, with ibis like OMD, Pentax K-5 style on screen-menu,touch screen- optiona(can turn off}l,hybrid viewfinder like Fuji,controls like fuji/x-pro,an android o/s with wi-fi, weather/dust resistant, all buttons customizable, video features like pany gh-3,no aa filter,very few controls on front of camera, focus peaking, handheld twi-light mode,5-7 shot ae bracketing,

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Oct 22, 2012)

Android as OS automatically removes camera from any purchase or recommendation list I'd ever make. There just can't be any more stupid idea then that.

0 upvotes
Michal59
By Michal59 (Oct 22, 2012)

I wonder for whom this camera would be? Amateur - no, certainly not. Adv.amateur - far too many buttons and switches, to bulky (IMHO), Pros - maybe, but I wonder if they would pay this price (I estimate it'll be high or very high) for fixed lens camera.

1 upvote
Bhiromography
By Bhiromography (Oct 22, 2012)

Don't mention the price

0 upvotes
Humboldt Jim
By Humboldt Jim (Oct 22, 2012)

Control concept is good but can't see the advantage in the OVF. Takes a lot of space and is heavy. Also, this is not even a rangefinder style camera because real rangefinders need to have widely spaced lenses for the rangefinder to work effectively. Therefor the whole top of the camera is taken up by the rangefinder and not "humped" on one side.

I say scrap the retro OVF pretense and go with state of art EVF.

2 upvotes
OseasMillan
By OseasMillan (Oct 22, 2012)

Y su nieve de que la quieren?

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Oct 22, 2012)

Thanks for sharing. Way too many buttons and controls.

0 upvotes
KZMike
By KZMike (Oct 23, 2012)

If you are not liking the use of button and controls, then its an easy choice to go out and purchase most anything being produced and sold today. . .

0 upvotes
Tom Schum
By Tom Schum (Oct 22, 2012)

A Sigma DP2M with interchangeable lens mount on the front. That's all I wish for.
At this rate I might have to settle for a Fuji X-Pro1 instead.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 21, 2012)

PART 1

Hmmmmm .. I have avoided doing any comments. But ... now I could not resist any longer :) The C1 looks nice, but it is just too much already. And all those things on the front? That only the subject sees? Gone those!

My dream camera might look similar (I have also owned some Canon G cameras), but it is much, much simpler.

It also contains some SciFi features :)

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Oct 21, 2012)

"And all those things on the front? That only the subject sees?"

The idea is (I assume) that your fingers 'see' those controls on the front, so your eyes never need to. Which is good.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Oct 22, 2012)

My dream camera in first place: Doesn't look like this crap.
And secondly - it's a DSLR/hybrid taking advantage of both worlds without compromising ergonomics like that one *yay trillion buttons on tiny, heavy brick!*.

2 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 23, 2012)

My idea is that the camera is so simple, that all those buttons and settings in menus are not necessary.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 21, 2012)

PART 2

I want a camera I like to hold, like to use and simple do exactly what I want it to do, with a high degree of accuracy. I want to be able to trust the camera, and I want it to be repeatable. And I want it to be simple.

I dont care about different file formats and different file qualities. Remove that! Just give me max quality all the time. I dont care about in camera manipulations. Remove that! Or strange exposure modes! Remove that!

I just want manual exposure mode. To be able to implement that, I need a digital camera. I dont want any analog sensor. I want a digital one. The sensor shall directly count photons, one counter per pixel. And the counter shall be large, maybe 24 bits.

0 upvotes
MacManX
By MacManX (Oct 22, 2012)

Roland, what do you mean by "analog sensor"?
CCD and CMOS sensors are all digital...

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 23, 2012)

No, the ccd and cmos sensors are not digital. Sure - they detect photons. But its a stochastic detection. Lots of photons are missed and lots are invented as noise. And when you read the value, you add more noise. And if you set a higher ISO, you do analog amplification. The detector I am dreaming of steps a counter when a photon arrives, and dont step any counter when no photon arrives. I shall be able to expose in total darkness (e.g. with the lens cap of) for days without getting any noise. Just as you can do with film.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 21, 2012)

PART 3

The only thing I have to do then is to choose exposure time and aperture and then take the image. No ISO! Gone that! Maybe I want a warning that current settings might count a bit to few photons to get a good image. Thats all.

Auto focus is a problem. Its hard to manually focus fast. But auto focus sux, big time. It misses! Personally I dont really know what to do about that. But I do know that I do like precision focus. Then you cannot have those auto focus lenses with floating elements. You need old fashioned rotating focus rings. Irritating, as they are slow. Dont know what to do here.

Zoom shall be by rotating, not the push two buttons power zoom. No way! I want accuracy. And I want repeatability. If I have zoomed to X focal length, I want to be able to do it again. No zoom cannot really do this. Thats one reason why I like prime lenses :)

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 21, 2012)

PART 4

A good view finder and/or LCD is very important. LCDs today cannot be seen in bright light and is very bad outdoors in general. This needs to be fixed. How? I dont know. It just needs to be fixed!

I like the view finder in the C1. Ill take that!

I also like the form factor. A camera you like to use has to be somewhat bigger than most compact cameras today. My G10 feels just fine. Could even be slightly larger. I dont need to put the camera in a pocket. I like to carry it around my neck. But ... it shall not be big and clumsy, like a DSLR with a zoom lens.

Maybe it can have a somewhat better grip. Make the grip somewhat deeper.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Oct 21, 2012)

So - I wrote a reply. And it said 1534 characters over limit. They want me to explain what camera I want in 500 characters? Gone that! I have to post it in 4 posts! And - if DPR dont like it - they can remove what I wrote :P

I will write last thing first so its easier to read.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
iaki
By iaki (Oct 21, 2012)

Quite frankly, I don´t understand this exercise but for the pure pleasure of aesthetics or image creation. The concept has a naivety to it which is charming, but fails in way too many things as designing "the perfect car" or "the perfect stop sign".

There are too many phisical buttons. That is not a good thing, and most of them are on the very front of the camera. Very hard to memorize them and let the muscle memory work.

Thing is that this is a 1995 mobile phone to what current smartphones are. There are too many function overlays [why are there so many overlaid selection roulettes?], and overall it doesn´t seem to be a very fast approaching design. The main inconsistency is that the camera seems to be a street shooter, but it is too garish, too much of a selection maze to be a snappy shooter.

Plus, there is not any flash on it. Why? Built in flash is, for me, one of the best features ever, and adds much more flexibility that the space it takes out.

0 upvotes
Joe186
By Joe186 (Oct 21, 2012)

N I C E !

...all it needs is a BIG, stabilized Foveon sensor...

http://www.foveon.com

...dual Digic V processors or even one Digic 5+...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIGIC

...and a pure Fluorite lens, stabilized in sync with the stabilized sensor, using the Digic processor(s)...

http://www.canon.com/technology/canon_tech/movie/optics.wvx

Imagine what a Digic 5+ integrated, synchronized sensor/lens stabilization combination could do!

2 upvotes
xtoph
By xtoph (Oct 21, 2012)

i think there are some obvious mis-steps (eg, a 'classic' rf style vf would have to be on the corner, not center, and it would be better there in any event), but some of the criticisms i've read in comments seem much further off the mark. what i don't think the author is getting enough credit for are some genuinely good ideas, some relatively obvious but rarely implemented (e.g., iso on dedicated dial), some probably not yet seen in actual cameras (e.g., the 'square' dial setting for custom internal defaults.

and naturally i agree that lots of manual dials are a good thing, but from a practical standpoint i acknowledge that a) they quickly become expensive, and b) they are all one more point where the camera can break down--and without some of those settings, the camera essentially doesn't work.

'ideal camera' has to strike a balance not just with what is abstractly desirable, but also with what can work, imo.

still, kudos for the effort. and don't let the naysayers get you down.

1 upvote
Easycass
By Easycass (Oct 21, 2012)

Intersting comments all up... people seem to love or hate cameras. In this case it does not matter so much, as I think the point was to stimulate the discussion... whch seemed to work quite well.

To those that want a simpler camera, the good news is they already exist. I am not sure you would have liked a Nikon F4s very much either...

This was simply taking the many analogue controls from the F4s for 'capturing images', marry them with digital controls from a D300/700 type body for "digital parameter selection', and then move the controls around a little to give a more managegble arrangement in a smaller body.

Never said it would be pretty of course... just fun to try.

And yes, we all still have our favourites; I love the photo-taking simplcity of the Nikon FE2, loved the innovation of the Ricoh R1, and have owned most of the Canon G-series compacts... Now just need one of these puppies, and I'm good.

And I defintely loved all the comments... Some really made me laugh...

4 upvotes
Richie Beans
By Richie Beans (Oct 21, 2012)

If it doesn't have a fully articulated screen, it's just an ideal paperweight.

1 upvote
boktek
By boktek (Oct 21, 2012)

Excellent design; Photographers like to have as many buttons and dials accessible as possible. Menu's are a pain and delay so much. Would like to see larger sensor: APS-C or FF and swivel and articulated rear panel. But of most interest is low ISO! Too much emphasis on getting the highest ISO and not enough on getting excellent colour and hdr. This is achieved by having a camera with ISO 6; 12.5 and 25. I would buy such a camera.

0 upvotes
Gary Eickmeier
By Gary Eickmeier (Oct 21, 2012)

Not an inspired form. I think the marriage of still and video is inevitable, as witness the Sony NEX VG900. Should have all of the inputs and outputs required for great video plus the usual settings for still photos. Articulated LCD like video cameras.

Gary Eickmeier

0 upvotes
ncsakany
By ncsakany (Oct 21, 2012)

Can you say fugly?

2 upvotes
alexzn
By alexzn (Oct 21, 2012)

Well, take Fuji XPro-1, put on their latest zoom lens, and you get something that si not too far from what you describe.

0 upvotes
andrewparkoo
By andrewparkoo (Oct 20, 2012)

Don't give up the day job - looks hideous - expect Nikon won't be happy someone plonking their logo over this - couldn't you get any more buttons and dials on?!

0 upvotes
gusda9
By gusda9 (Oct 20, 2012)

ill take 2 of them plz.... love it

2 upvotes
km25
By km25 (Oct 20, 2012)

If this were an ideal camera, in my book. It would not smaller then APC, FF would be better. Somewhere from min. 18Mp to a max 24MP. 20-22 would be the best balance of IQ and low light noise. No AA filter, like th e Fuji X-Pro. Along with with it's finder would be great, but just a no hybride would be fine. Movies would be nice. 1/8000 sec sutter and more then 5fps not really, but woud take. AND MOST IMPORT SHARP LENS AND GOOD SELECTION!!!, that means the lens are interchangable.. NOT A FIXED LENS. If this camera has 10-1000mm f1.2, it must have a small sensor.. the FL is an equal to 35mm formate.

1 upvote
calijente
By calijente (Oct 20, 2012)

Mine is not exactly a camera, but a phone app. You enter the map and time coordinates and you get a picture on the screen as seen from that very precise point, at that very precise time, which you can scroll, focus and zoom all around. The picture is recomposed from an image database recorded by a gazillion of lytro-type cameras spread everywhere in the known world and stored in the cloud.

On second thought, why bother with a smart phone in the first place? Just think at it, close your eyes and have the image projected in your mind. I can already do that.

1 upvote
RikMaxSpeed
By RikMaxSpeed (Oct 20, 2012)

So much about this camera is about dealing with technical limitations that it's a bit of a pointless exercise - if you have an F1.2 10-1000mm zoom, why not have a 100 GigaPixel ISO quadrillion sensor to match?

My ideal camera would take photos as though through my eyes (in stereo 3D naturally), ultra sensitive (such that an exposure compensation dial is superfluous), aperture & focus are achieved through post-processing (like the Lytra). And there's no button to press to take a photo as it scans my brain to know when to click! :o)

(BTW, my ideal camera also captures infra-red & ultra-violet as I want to be able to see what a bee sees)

4 upvotes
Fhoton
By Fhoton (Oct 20, 2012)

I like this design as is. The more buttons the better, menu diving is always a time waster. Give me a big bright viewfinder and weather seals and I'll be pre-ordering this thing in 3 minutes .... hoping for pre-xmas delivery ;-)

2 upvotes
Merry Prankster
By Merry Prankster (Oct 20, 2012)

Digital version of the Nikon F3 or FM2 with the same sensor as the D600. No auto anything, including no auto focus. No stabilization.

The FM2, FE2 and F3 all have interchangeable backs. I've often wondered if a digital sensor back could be built as replacement back for these cameras. Much like Nikon and Kodak did with the Nikon F3. Only using a good modern day sensor.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
pcworth
By pcworth (Oct 20, 2012)

Deleted and moved to other forum!

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
pcworth
By pcworth (Oct 20, 2012)

Yuk! That has to be one of the world's ugliest, and most cumbersome cameras ever! You would spend more time checking that each button is in the correct place than you would taking pictures. I'm all for a bit of manual control that does not involve mega menus, but moving it to mega stacked buttons and dials is asking for trouble.

7 upvotes
cruser2469
By cruser2469 (Oct 22, 2012)

Says the auto shooter. Most of us that want this kind of a camera do check our settings all the time.

1 upvote
Total comments: 136
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