Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review

Panasonic's much-leaked Lumix DMC-GX7 is arguably the company's most enthusiast-focused mirrorless camera yet to hit the market. Back in 2011, Panasonic released the DMC-GX1 in a move to appease enthusiasts who grew more and more disappointed as the promising GF-series got smaller and simpler, with fewer controls in the GF2 and GF3 models. The GX1, however, seemed like an interim move, adding minor enhancements to the original GF1 design and changing the badge, while fans watched as Sony's NEX-7 and later the Olympus E-M5 offered more controls and sophisticated features, including a built-in EVF.

While few of the GX7's specifications stand out as revolutionary (aside, perhaps, from its built-in articulated electronic viewfinder), our impression was that it contains plenty of small tweaks and features sure to endear it the enthusiast crowd.

Key specifications

  • 16MP Live MOS sensor
  • In-body image stabilization (works with any lens)
  • Front and rear control dials
  • Flip-up, 1024 x 768 pixel (2.3M dot equivalent) electronic viewfinder
  • 3-inch tilting LCD
  • 3-level focus peaking
  • 1080 video at 60p/60i/24p in MP4 or AVCHD format
  • Built-in Wi-Fi with NFC
  • Magnesium-alloy frame
  • 1/8000 second max shutter speed, 1/320th flash sync speed
  • Highlight and shadow curve adjustments
  • Built-in pop-up flash
  • Large contoured grip

It's hard to know whether to think of the GX7 as being a post-NEX-7 or a post-E-M5 camera - but to an extent that's the point: unlike the GX1, which appeared to be a rather-too-late, warmed-over GF1, the GX7 is a camera that has learned from the increasingly impressive cameras it will have to compete with.

So, despite Panasonic producing an extensive range of image-stabilized lenses, the GX7 incorporated in-body stabilization. This will be a welcome move for anyone hoping to use legacy lenses or any of Olympus's prime lenses for the Micro Four Thirds system. Combined with the 'focus peaking' manual focus aid that Sony re-introduced to its NEX cameras, it promises to make the GX7 one of the more capable options, when it comes to shooting with adapted lenses.

The GX7 is one of a surprisingly small number of mirrorless cameras to offer a DSLR-style twin-dial control system.

But that's not the full extent of the GX7's offerings for keen photographers - a maximum shutter speed of 1/8000th of a second and a flash sync speed of 1/320th suggest Panasonic is serious about appealing to enthusiast photographers. The GX7 is also in unexpectedly exclusive company when it comes to offering a DSLR-like twin-dial control system. There are several mirrorless cameras with two control dials, but remarkably few that make it easy to simply set one to control aperture or shutter speed, and the other to control exposure compensation, which makes the semi-auto Av and Tv modes enjoyable to shoot in.

Wi-Fi

As with most recent Panasonic models - including the G6 and GF6 - the GX7 features Wi-Fi with the option to use NFC to establish a connection and transfer photos simply by 'tapping' the two devices together. Like those other cameras, it allows you to connect the camera to Wi-Fi networks to download your images, or to push them to social networks, but our understanding is that Panasonic hasn't modified its rather labyrinthine setup system.

Much better executed is the behavior with smartphones, where an iOS or Android app can be used to take remote control over almost all the camera's settings. It's also fairly straightforward to connect to a smartphone and pull images off the camera if you want to push them out to social networks yourself.

Silent mode

The GX7 is also one of the few cameras we've seen to use its optional electronic shutter to offer an effective silent shooting mode for discreet shooting. The camera is limited to a sensitivity range of ISO 200-3200 in silent mode, and the flash, AF illuminator and all camera sounds are disabled when the mode is engaged. We were quite impressed with silent mode, several of us commenting that we would likely use it often.

Electronic viewfinder

The most immediately visible new feature of the GX7 is its flip-up electronic viewfinder. We've seen corner-mounted EVFs before, but this is the first built-in unit we've seen for a long time that articulates upwards, allowing for more flexible shooting. The viewfinder itself is built around a 1024 x 768-pixel LCD panel. This has become essentially the standard for high-end viewfinders, thanks to the 2.3M dot OLED finders in several Sony models, and the similarly high-res LCD used in the Fujifilm X100S / Olympus VF-4 viewfinder.

The Lumix GX7's flip-up electronic viewfinder is one of its most distinctive features.

However, the GX7 doesn't use either of these panels, instead making use of a field-sequential LCD. It uses around 780,000 dots that show red, green and blue information, one after the other, rather than using separate dots for each. The only drawback to this unique display method is called 'tearing,' in which colors appear to separate, causing red, green and blue edges left and right of high-contrast areas when panning rapidly. It was still present in the GX7, but not as bad as we've seen before, likely thanks to an increase in the refresh rate.

The EVF's optics give it an impressive 0.7x magnification (in 35mm camera terms) and we're pleased to see a menu option to turn down the sensitivity of the eye detection sensor, if you find it that you're frequently triggering it accidentally. Our only concern is the rather short 17.5mm eyepoint - which rarely works well, especially for wearers of glasses, in combination with high magnification viewfinders (it makes it hard to see the extreme edges of the frame without moving your eye). 

Video

The only peculiar gap in the specifications relates to video - an area we wouldn't expect such an oversight from Panasonic. The GX7 provides plenty of movie control - offering PASM exposure control, a wide choice of frame rates and a choice of capture format - but it doesn't have an option for connecting an external microphone. So although you have a camera that can shoot 1080p video at 24 or 50/60 frames per second (depending on region), or genuine interlaced 60i in AVCHD mode, and at bitrates of up to 28Mbps for the 24p footage, you'll always be limited to using the internal stereo microphones or an external recorder.

Impressions of the body and controls

Shooting briefly with the Panasonic GX7 was enough to tell us that Panasonic has been paying attention in the 20 months since it created the GX1, which has resulted in a camera that should indeed appeal to enthusiasts. 

The top view shows the GX7's tilting EVF, hot shoe, stereo mics, pop-up flash, front dial, record button, mode dial and power switch.

When you first take hold of the Panasonic GX7, it's the rubber-coated grip that stands out. It provides a good hold on the camera, certainly better than that provided by the GX1. The magnesium-alloy body is flex-free, with no creaking or twisting, as we've come to expect. The front and mode dials are just stiff enough that we doubt they'll too often turn accidentally, yet they respond well when turned. The power switch is in good position for fast activation. 

The Lumix GX7 offers plenty of ways to control settings, with four customizable Function buttons.

The rear control dial also serves as a button, by default bringing up exposure compensation in program and semi-auto modes (adjusting by +/- 5 stops in 1/3 stop increments). Turn the dial without pressing it and it adjusts program shift, or the pertinent parameter in shutter/aperture priority modes. When in the Quick Menu, it also adjusts parameters for the selected control.

Rather than leave you to go into a menu or remember a function button to switch between manual and autofocus, the GX7 features a physical switch surrounding the AF/AE lock button, a nice touch. 

Panasonic's new Quick menu looks a lot like the one on Canon's touchscreen SLRs and works about as well, activated with the Fn1 button. Fn2, for its part, brings up the curves menu, adjustable by touch or dial, which allows you to change shadow and highlight settings, and create and save up to three custom curves settings.

Overall, we like what we see. The Panasonic GX7's feature set more appropriately addresses the current market by including important features its predecessors left out. It also includes quite a few new bells and whistles found on competing products, most of which should enhance the experience, hopefully without being too much. The EVF, sensor-shift IS, focus peaking, 1/8000 second shutter speed and extra control dial should please most enthusiasts looking for a little more in their mirrorless camera. We look forward to putting it through its paces when we get a sample in for a full review.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Real-world Samples Gallery

There are 32 images in the Panasonic GX7 samples gallery. Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review), we do so in good faith, please don't abuse it.

Unless otherwise noted images taken with no particular settings at full resolution. Because our review images are now hosted on the 'galleries' section of dpreview.com, you can enjoy all of the new galleries functionality when browsing these samples.

 Panasonic GX7 Samples Gallery - published August 14th 2013

Comments

Total comments: 1202
5678
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (8 months ago)

This is the camera the GX1 SHOULD have been.

From a list of features, it blows the Sony NEX out of the water as NEX is so feature poor. Time for Sony to up their game.

Now I can ditch my NEX-6 and go all in on micro four thirds.

9 upvotes
pixelcollector
By pixelcollector (8 months ago)

to be fair, the NEX 7 is an impressive camera and has been out for quite some time now. Pana are doing something amazing here but they took their time indeed.

6 upvotes
Mapel
By Mapel (8 months ago)

This is a fine contender to the e-p5, I greatly appreciate the built-in viewfinder, and I too think this would be a great contender to the nex line, hoping in a price drop for the nex models to grab a nex 6 for a discounted price.

0 upvotes
blohum
By blohum (8 months ago)

Mapel: kudos for the Psygnosis owl! :)

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (8 months ago)

@GodSpeaks
If SONY and Fuji hasn't join the EVIL / Mirrorless market firing on all cylinders you probably would be choosing between a E-P3 and GF5 now.

Be glad there are competitions even if you have to overpay for a m4/3 camera.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

"This is the camera the GX1 SHOULD have been."

True.

"From a list of features, it blows the Sony NEX out of the water as NEX is so feature poor. "

How so? Seems exactly like NEX-6, plus useless flip-up EVF.

0 upvotes
cocopro
By cocopro (8 months ago)

show some respect to SONY, no SONY = no new sensor for your MFT. For $650 NEX6 holds better value anyway.

0 upvotes
Julian
By Julian (8 months ago)

I might wait for the price to come down on this, and then replace my GF1... It looks like they finally nailed all my key gripes. I love the inbuilt viewfinder, the silent shutter sounds awesome ;) I wonder how the new sensor handles at the higher iso's... Looking forward to some samples...

2 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (8 months ago)

Without seeing any testing I can confidently say if you're still using a GF1 you're going to love the high ISO capabilities of this.

0 upvotes
Julian
By Julian (8 months ago)

Well my big cameras are a D800 and D3 (which I know I should never compare this against - but I naturally do as these are what I use day to day) - if I can get anything like D3 high ISO I would be ecstatic - given the announced ISO range of the sensor - this might be within the realms of possibility.

0 upvotes
teebodo
By teebodo (8 months ago)

Totally agree. I have two GF1 bodies dedicated to the 20mm and the 14-45mm and have been saddened by how "toy-like" the GF series became; I am also not a fan of the DSLR style of pistol-grip bodies (just personal preference), and while the GX7 doesn't look as pocketable as the GF1 (yes, barely, but still possible) I am happiest to hear about IBIS (as wide as 20mm lens is it could still benefit) and silent mode -- with a little baby in the house the GF1 shutter noise is incredibly annoying. I've been thinking of trading it all in for an Oly but now I like what I see.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
1 upvote
happysprinkles
By happysprinkles (8 months ago)

The silent mode is a wonderful addition, but why disable other features at the expense of it. I can understand a stealth mode, but why not simply a silent shutter only mode. This makes no sense to limit other features to make the shutter quiet. The sound of my GX1 drives me crazy, it's not always a stealth issue, I just find it annoying. The flash, the AF light, ISO, give us these options with a silent shutter. Just because I don't want to hear the camera, doesn't mean I am trying to be discrete. I'd just leave the silent shutter on all the time. My Canon MKIII is so much nicer to use, not having to listen to the shutter. The technology is there, please let us have the options and use it. It's also going to be hard to go from a GX1, to a GX7, with only the few changes at the projected cost. While the user experience will be nicer with new features, what will that $1000 or so do for my file quality?

1 upvote
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (8 months ago)

The silent shutter mode clears and reads the sensor electronically - it's not some sort of magic "dampening" of the regular mechanical shutter. Because of this, there are some restrictions on what you can do with it due to how the sensor data is read out.

3 upvotes
goshigoo
By goshigoo (8 months ago)

Too bad that ISO starts with 200, it'd be perfect camera if it starts from ISO 100...

but it is still better than GX1 (ISO 160 x 1/4000) given it has 1/8000 shutter

Well, it has ISO 125, at the expense of DR; you can do this in PP on any ISO 200 based camera, but it is more convenient for the camera to do it for you

IBIS, EVF + titable LCD, silent shutter, dual dial, HDR/Panorama/NFC/Wifi/built-in flash

this camera is the ultimate camera for travel so far!
I am getting this!

1 upvote
Tobias1234
By Tobias1234 (8 months ago)

How long does it take to read out the sensor in silent shutter mode?
The G5, G6, GH3 need ~1/10s, so silent shutter mode can lead to heavy tearing.
Is the GX7 implementation of this feature better?

4 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (8 months ago)

$1000 body only? Ha haha hahaha hahahahaha!!!

9 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (8 months ago)

comparable to all other cameras in its class. EM5 was more than this at launch, as were GH series and EP5.

7 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (8 months ago)

Cheaper than the Olympus E-P5 with optional EVF. Who's laughing now?

12 upvotes
jtan163
By jtan163 (8 months ago)

Deleted - it was a silly comment.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

NEX-6 is less than $600 ($648 - $50 gift card and includes plenty of extra accessories on B&H). E-M5, with 5-axis IBIS actually working in video, 9 full-res fps and WEATHER SEALED BODY is about $850. $1000 for this is totally crazy today (of course $1000 for E-P5 is even crazier).

0 upvotes
Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni
By Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni (8 months ago)

Features are nice, but...
Panasonic mentioned that they developed a new sensor for this camera. This means they are not using GH3 sensor? Will have to wait and watch to see the performance of new sensor.

10 upvotes
eilivk
By eilivk (8 months ago)

Tilting EVF and LCD, and in body stabilization?! Let's hope it's up among the best. Would be nice with my 20mm. Good to see Panasonic doing something new. Must be near the top of the dpr review list?

9 upvotes
pixelcollector
By pixelcollector (8 months ago)

How were they able to implement IBIS? I read that Oly had exclusive rights to this tech or that they (pana and oly) had agreed to use different IS methods.

This camera sure packs a hefty wallop. I'll be extremely interested to see if it trumps the E-P5 by leaps and bounds or if the E-P5 will still be the camera to get, if the price drops considerably of course.

0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (8 months ago)

'How were they able to implement IBIS? "

Olympus doesn't own patents on IBIS. The first DSLR with IBIS were made by Minolta years ago.

4 upvotes
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (8 months ago)

Pentax has also used sensor-shift stabilization on its cameras since well before M43 came along.

4 upvotes
pixelcollector
By pixelcollector (8 months ago)

thanks for clearing that up. question still remains why they've never implemented it before. ah, actually, it makes sense if they want to focus on sales of I.S. lenses..

0 upvotes
Archiver
By Archiver (8 months ago)

This is the first Panasonic m43 body with in body stabilization. When the first m43 cameras came to the market, Olympus began with IBIS bodies and lenses with no OIS, and Panasonic had no IBIS but stabilized lenses.

Pana's original marketing for m43 was aimed at young women, but they have obviously noticed the market for users of legacy lenses with no OIS. I predict that more and more Pana bodies will incorporate IBIS over the next few years.

0 upvotes
moizes 2
By moizes 2 (8 months ago)

What about self - cleaning system? Do I miss something?

0 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (8 months ago)

OIS is great for manufacturers - since customeers have to buy new lenses if they want to get the latest version of OIS (eg Nikon's VR, VRII, VRII,...). With IBIS you get the latest version on all your lenses when you upgrade your camera body - which most of us do periodically.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (8 months ago)

BTW Has anybody used the feature some Pentax bodies have of using IBIS to track stars and avoid "star trails" when doing astrophotography? Does this feature work well?

I don't photograph the night sky - but the idea is interesting.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Oleg Vinokurov
By Oleg Vinokurov (8 months ago)

Looks awesome, especially the grip. But lets see, how it actually performs.

0 upvotes
eques
By eques (8 months ago)

This sounds very good indeed, and the GX7 looks very much like the camera I have been waiting for.

An articulated LCD would have been nice, though. After using G models, I have become used to it and would miss it.

However, is the EVF really a problem, if you wear glasses?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (8 months ago)

I have the same concern about losing my articulated LCD, however I feel that's made up for by remote viewfinder over wifi.

0 upvotes
guinness2
By guinness2 (8 months ago)

Would EVF dioptric correction help in this ? For me- yes, but have reading glasses only.Thus screen is unusable for me :-)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Panasonicus
By Panasonicus (8 months ago)

As an owner of a G3 with which I am very pleased (apart from very poor battery life) I am open to an upgrade but not size-wise. Most of the GF series offer nothing over the G series and especially if you require a viewfinder. That this one also allows the use of Olympus lenses while retaining IS is a big deal indeed. I suspect the only wasp in the paste will be the price. Aside from that possible deal breaker, this looks like the best yet from Panasonic--especially if it is as small as my much loved G3.
Update: just read the specs--its quite a lot larger and heavier than the G3. Pity--what is the real advantage here other than more direct controls? No fully articulated screen is a negative.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ptox
By ptox (8 months ago)

Sorry, did you just write that the GX7 is quite a bit larger than the G3? Where did you see that?

3 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (8 months ago)

I'm a GH1 user. The G3 is extremely similar in performance and design, though mine's a bit bigger, so I feel I'm well qualified to answer, barring actually using a GX7.

GX7 looks to have a cheaper start price than an OMD or GH model, though still almost double a G5 today.

For that 100% premium in the GX7, besides aesthetics, build quality and increased manual control, you're getting a rumoured 25% improved sensor and IBIS, both of which combined may add a few stops improvement. For the loss of screen articulation, you're getting both a remote viewfinder via smartphone as well as tilting EVF. Then there's the faster shutter & flash sync and wifi photo transfer.

The weight difference will be negligible. 66g in the body is going to be worth 200+ in a lens due to the weight distribution. Therefore it will be less noticeable than carrying the 14mm pancake (50 grams; so light I forget it's in my jeans pocket).

I think you're spot on; price will be the biggest factor since g5 is so cheap.

3 upvotes
pixelcollector
By pixelcollector (8 months ago)

I am using a G3 and thought my next upgrade would be the E-p5. I'm also shocked if it's true that the GX7 is much larger.

Fully articulated screen will be missed very much indeed.

0 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (8 months ago)

115 x 84 x 47 mm (4.53 x 3.31 x 1.85″) G3
123 x 71 x 55 mm (4.83 x 2.78 x 2.15″) GX7

I calculate this as a 2% increase in surface area.

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

"GX7 looks to have a cheaper start price than an OMD"

It is actually the same in the US (if you forget about OM-D promotions at start, like free flash etc). But it is not 18 months ago, E-M5 body can be had for $850, and NEX-6 body for less than $600.

0 upvotes
Mike Cialowicz
By Mike Cialowicz (8 months ago)

Odd... they claim it has front and rear control dials, but all I see is a rear dial. Is the front dial the toothed thing surrounding the shutter button? Is that awkward to use?

3 upvotes
DPReview Staff
By DPReview Staff (8 months ago)

Yes. No.

10 upvotes
urix
By urix (8 months ago)

Mike, did you count the dial around a shutter release button?

0 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (8 months ago)

The front control dial is around the shutter release button.

0 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (8 months ago)

Does the Rear Dial offer dual function by pressing it like in other Panasonic CSCs?

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (8 months ago)

The review mention it acts as a button for changing EC as well as a dial for program shift by default.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

The #1 feature that is catching my attention is the silent shooting mode. It's the reason why I have come to appreciate leaf shutter cameras. I know it has its limitations (max ISO 3200 and can have some tearing if you move) but it does make a difference in several situations.

7 upvotes
DPReview Staff
By DPReview Staff (8 months ago)

It was very cool, and one of the main things I like about the Nikon 1 cameras.

3 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (8 months ago)

I would also like a silent shutter, even in an non-sensitive environment, just for my own peace of mind. I have an older mirrorless and it exposes so loudly that you might think of *two" mirrors thrashing up and down in the box instead of, supposedly, zero.

1 upvote
filigor
By filigor (8 months ago)

Unfortunately silent shutter mode on my G5 has a minor rolling effect. Not a big deal but if I want to shot a sequence of frames for HDR it can be critical. So consider to use an advanced shooting technique in silent mode...

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

@Shawn- for street life such mode is priceless :-) It's the reason I love leaf shutter. I realize it has its limits and you can get tearing/rolling shutter/issues with fluorescent lights-frequencies but still, it can be so nice in several situations.

I am crossing my fingers Fuji could do a firmware update with this for their current Xtrans but it's up to whatever that sensor can do I guess.

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (8 months ago)

most compacts shoot silently (once you figure out how to turn of the stupid shutter sound).

2 upvotes
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (8 months ago)

I've been waiting for a couple of years now for a smallish camera with a decent sized sensor that I can take everywhere, which also does good 1080p60 video and has an articulated LCD. Along the way I added WiFi to my list. And now in the last month or so along comes this camera and the Sony RX100-Mk.II

Now I have to think hard about whether the RX100 will come close enough to meeting my needs on its own or whether the GX7 will be small enough for me to take it everywhere. It would be nice to have everything in one camera, but I may just end up having to buy both...

2 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (8 months ago)

Why about the NEX 5R with baby pancake 20mm (35mm equiv) lens?

1 upvote
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (8 months ago)

I was actually somewhat interested in the NEX-6, but its video compares unfavourably to Panasonic's cameras. And the larger sensor means larger and heavier lenses. While I want the camera to be compact for take-everywhere use, if I'm going to choose an ILC then I'm going to want additional lenses for it for the occasions that I need them, and I'd like those to not weigh me down any more than I can help it.

1 upvote
Fuzzyfelt
By Fuzzyfelt (8 months ago)

Sean, I bought an NEX-6 when I wanted good video and good pictures. When I did the research, nothing compared to the NEX range when it came to video quality and operation. I would have loved to have bought a 4/3s or stuck in camp Canon with a G1X but none of them offered full control during filming or had a good range of resolutions. Unless you go Pana GH2/GH3, I couldn't find any evidence to say Sony's video compares unfavourably.

I'll be interested to see how well the video performs and operates on this one though.

1 upvote
Gregory Wilder
By Gregory Wilder (8 months ago)

The GX7 looks like one of the best m4/3 cameras on the market. I have owned m4/3 for several years now, and this is the m4/3 I have been hoping for. However, Sony and Fuji seem to be the innovators in the CSC/mirrorless area right now. I have tried both the NEX6 and the Fuji X line the last 2 months. I think both blow away the m4/3 in terms of IQ and features and innovation.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

Well see how good (or not) the sensor in this camera is, a Panasonic new design. Hopefully no banding. If the sensor is ballpark as good (ditto if better) as the EM-5/Pen5, I just can't see anyone in their right mind picking a Pen 5 over this model.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
pixelcollector
By pixelcollector (8 months ago)

can't wait for a comparison of the two. I still love and maybe prefer the P5 design, and if the GX7 will force the price down it may still be a sensible choice.

1 upvote
Spunjji
By Spunjji (8 months ago)

The superior IBIS on the P5 might still sway me. I'm looking for a camera that will allow me to manual focus my 300mm mirror lens with some degree of accuracy; having a stabilised viewfinder would be a huge boon.

Based on preview shots elsewhere it's possible that the P5 still has the edge in image quality, too, but we'll have to wait to see final models for a proper judgement.

1 upvote
NetMage
By NetMage (8 months ago)

Don't forget it also has focus peaking so that should help as well.

0 upvotes
MrMojo
By MrMojo (8 months ago)

To Ed Buziak: Take a look at the R Strap. I use it with a D200 and it is a boon for street/travel photography. Your gear is out of the way and out of sight until you need it; getting the shot and returning the camera to its resting place takes a few seconds.

Since switching to the R Strap I am taking more and better street photos while leaving me more time to enjoy my companions and surroundings while traveling.

1 upvote
Ed Buziak
By Ed Buziak (8 months ago)

Thanks for that tip... and I especially like the last sentence (too often forgotten nowadays) about enjoying more time with "faces and places". ;~)

0 upvotes
Ed Buziak
By Ed Buziak (8 months ago)

The "silent" mode sounds (ahem) very desirable... street and candid photography is getting increasingly difficult - here in France at least - and my old D300 with manual lenses just creates too much noise and negative attention!

3 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (8 months ago)

how was the touch screen?

3 upvotes
DPReview Staff
By DPReview Staff (8 months ago)

It was capacitive, so it worked well.

8 upvotes
arguros
By arguros (8 months ago)

Does in-body IS work in video mode?

0 upvotes
dombi
By dombi (8 months ago)

I don't have the source, but I read it somewhere that it does not work in video mode.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (8 months ago)

Pop up viewfinder, cool.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

Shooting right up often? What's wrong with your neck then?

0 upvotes
Mikhail Tal
By Mikhail Tal (8 months ago)

DPR You do not have a great track record recently of reviewing mirrorless cameras. The GF5, G5, E-PL5, NEX-5R and NX 20 seem to have been skipped completely, and the GF6, G6 and NEX-3N have been available for a few months with still no review. I'm not even counting the E-PL6 but you haven't reviewed that yet either. In contrast you've reviewed literally every DSLR released so far except the newish K-50, as far as I can tell, and almost every premium compact and even some cheap compacts.

So with that all being said, I strongly request that you give the GX7 review VERY HIGH priority. On paper it is the best mirrorless camera to date, and one of the best if not the best consumer-level cameras of any variety to date. It deserves your quick attention, a whole lot more than, say, the Canon T5i did.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
83 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (8 months ago)

Agreed.

17 upvotes
SeancJam
By SeancJam (8 months ago)

I literally just made an account to plus 1 your comment. Can't believe the NEX 5R has still not been reviewed.

Most of the cameras get a full preview and the Author promises a full review yet it never comes.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
21 upvotes
Chris Tofalos
By Chris Tofalos (8 months ago)

Well said! :-)

9 upvotes
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (8 months ago)

sad truth is DLSR reviews get a lot more traffic than most mirrorless, so they get prioritized. It's not because we don't want to review them all, we just don't have the resources (yet) to do so.

15 upvotes
RitterRunkel
By RitterRunkel (8 months ago)

Additionally there are some odd things here like models not selectable in the RAW-Comparison. The SD1 Merrill, for instance, is only comparable by calling the review of the SD1 itself and then select the contrahents ...

7 upvotes
Adrian Harris
By Adrian Harris (8 months ago)

Fully agree with original poster. To DPR - The thing is Simon, DSLR's will get most traffic, I have to read those as there is little else here to read (as regards M4/3 reviews). You can't have site traffic going to something not reviewed!

12 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (8 months ago)

Mirrorless would get more traffic if Dpreview wanted it to be that way.

3 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (8 months ago)

Wasn't there some statistics that shows EVIL / Mirrorless only accounts for 12% of all interchangeable lens camera sales? Why review something when you know no one will buy? I think just reviewing the high-end models should be enough.

1 upvote
Mikhail Tal
By Mikhail Tal (8 months ago)

And what percent of fixed lens cameras sales are made up of rugged cameras? Probably a lot less than 12% yet DPR still managed to give all six of them their own review.

5 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (8 months ago)

If you want DP to give you 5-page reviews on aforementioned camera please let them know so they can skip the usual 25-40 pages.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

"On paper it is the best mirrorless camera to date"

Almost gave your thumbs up, and then this.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

Simon Joinson: "sad truth is DLSR reviews get a lot more traffic than most mirrorless, so they get prioritized. It's not because we don't want to review them all, we just don't have the resources (yet) to do so."

T5i review should have been done like this: "see T4i review, only the kit 18-55 lens is a little bigger and mode dial goes around without stops".

SL1 review should have been done "see T5i review, only the camera is smaller and uncomfortable to hold, battery life is much shorter and the screen does not articulate".

See, saved you a whole man-months at least. And extra click-throughs to the respectable reviews. :)

But you still have a chance to use that tactic with Pentax k-50: "See k-30, only available in more colors". Done.

I give you the reproduction rights for the above reviews free of charge. :)

5 upvotes
Mikhail Tal
By Mikhail Tal (8 months ago)

peevee what existing mirrorless camera is better than the GX7 on paper?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

E-M5. Weather sealing, non-tearing EVF and 5-axis IBIS are useful for everybody (about 100% of customers), 1/8000s shutter speed is useful for 0.1% of customers shooting fast primes in bright sunlight wide open without ND filters, WiFi and flip-up EVF are useless gimmicks.

0 upvotes
Mikhail Tal
By Mikhail Tal (8 months ago)

You haven't even seen the GX7 VF yet, it is higher resolution and the tearing may be minimal enough that most won't notice it or be distracted by it. The difference in quality of IBIS may not be that significant to most either. Weather sealing may be important to a small group of people but for most people it's used about as often as 1/8000, especially as there's only one weather sealed m4/3 lens.

Wifi is a question mark depending on how it is implemented but NFC should be very useful for most people to easily move their images to their smartphones where it's easy to share them, etc. The grip and buttons are better than the E-M5, there is no hump, it has a pop-up flash, and there are more external controls. Also the sensor might be better. And unlike Olmpus cameras it auto corrects for distortion, CA, vignetting. Also has better video.

0 upvotes
xpda
By xpda (5 months ago)

Three months later, I guess the "very high priority" didn't happen. It would be nice to read a full review.

0 upvotes
webrunner5
By webrunner5 (8 months ago)

Hmm, looks pretty impressive.

2 upvotes
Iceman1973
By Iceman1973 (8 months ago)

Yes it is impressive, but I cannot get over the price of these new MFT cameras. £819 body only.
Canon Eos M - £399 (with 18-55) and selling the 18-55 fetches around £140 ish - get a EFM to EF/s adapter for £85 and get a 50mm 1.8 prime (£64 ish at MPB) and you get a great kit.
I fail to see why the recent MFT cameras are so expensive.

2 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

Canon EOS M is that cheap because it didn't sell and it's on its way out (to make way for their new model). Keep in mind the kind of extra performance you get on a GX7 vs the Canon. The AF is light years ahead of the Canon model. And no EVF on the Canon? Remember it's not just any EVF either- its the highest resolution EVF of all cameras as of right now. That surely means a premium, don't you think?

6 upvotes
Iceman1973
By Iceman1973 (8 months ago)

Raist3d I don't disagree with you - but for the price of the Eos M, and knowing the IQ, you're saving around £400.
We all stick to what we prefer, and that's personal preference. I've learnt after spending large amounts on bodies that money beter be spent on glass, so i teach myself to compromise and let the additional £400 go on glass. At the end the only thing that's premium to me is the quality of image produced.
But to each their own. (don't mean to argue, just stating an opinion)

2 upvotes
StephanSchmidt
By StephanSchmidt (8 months ago)

@Iceman1973: That's the reason I only buy old bodies and got an new EPL5 for EUR 300 last week. Is the P5/GX7 better? Sure. Is it 700 EUR better? Hmm. Is it better with the kit lens compared to a EPL5/75/1.8 or 45 (if you're into primes)? Surely not.

2 upvotes
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