Amalfi Coast Highway, Positano, Italy, 2007.

Filter: "1962".
Border: "47mm Square".

Vintage Looks

Of the 100+ "looks" that CameraBag 2 provides, the majority fall into the categories of vintage or retro. For brevity's sake, only some of the most significant are mentioned here.


Vintage Snapshots

Notable styles for emulating vintage snapshots:

  • 1958, 1974, 1983, Poolside — various color styles, generally somewhat faded and color-tinted.
  • Instant — reduced contrast, drastically reduced saturation, with a color cast that can involve two different colors across the image depending on the Remix setting. I think this is aiming to emulate the degraded look of expired instant film; Polaroid quit making film in 2008.
  • Lolo — my personal recommendation for emulating the look of a vintage Polaroid that was originally taken on fresh color film. Polaroid color films tended to have a high-contrast, high-saturation look when properly exposed (example on page 9 of this review). However, the reds were particularly exposure-sensitive — overexposure tended to reduce the reds and yellows, while underexposure tended to emphasize the reds and yellows. Since the backing layer was black instead of white, shadows in Polaroids tended to be very black compared with color prints from negatives.
  • Italiano — sepia-tinted monochrome, with vignette.
  • Skater — high-contrast, high-saturation, a bit grainy.

Notable filters for emulating vintage snapshots:

  • 1937, 1941, 1952, Mono — various monochrome styles.
  • Film NC01 — a passable emulation of C-22 Kodacolor and Kodacolor X film, used into the early 1970s, including Instamatic cameras. For a more accurate emulation, some grain should be added.
  • Viewster — reduced contrast with a color cast.

Notable borders for emulating vintage snapshots:

  • Custom Straight — a classic, straightforward, white or black border. A white border would normally be used for a print, and a black border for a transparency or a print from a transparency. (Example on page 7 of this review.)
  • 47mm Square — not really an emulation of type 127 roll film with a 4x4cm square transparency (or a print from a transparency), but close. Type 127 is 46mm, not 47mm, wide. Type 127 square was a popular snapshooting format in the late '50s and into the '60s. (Example on this page.)
  • Eroded — emulation of type 120 roll film with a 6x6 square transparency (or a print from a transparency) and some ragged edges. Could also pass for type 127 roll film with a 4x4 square transparency or a print from a transparency. (Example on page 2 of this review.)
  • Paper — a basic 3:2 (4x6") paper border showing a little wear. (Example on page 8 of this review.)
  • White Slide — emulation of a standard 2x2" slide holder with a 3:2 35mm transparency. Far more border than picture.

Vintage Pro Photos

Styles for emulating vintage pro photography:

  • 1962 — high-contrast monochrome.
  • Magazine — brightened with crushed highlights, saturation somewhat reduced.

Notable filters for emulating vintage pro photography:

  • Cinema — brightened, slight bluish cast.
  • Portrait I - Portrait V — five monochrome portrait styles.

Notable borders for emulating vintage pro photography:

  • 47mm Square — not really an emulation of type 127 roll film with a 4x4cm (square) image, but close. Type 127 is 46mm, not 47mm, wide. Type 127 square was seen on "Baby Rolleiflex" TLRs produced from the early '30s through the '60s. Note: the Rolleiflex fed the film vertically, so you might want to crop if necessary to force the border to have the writing along the side edges. (Example on this page.)
  • Eroded — emulation of type 120 roll film with a 6x6 square transparency (or a print from a transparency) and some ragged edges. Could also pass for type 127 roll film with a 4x4 square transparency or a print from a transparency. (Example on page 2 of this review.)
  • Safety Film — used from about 1938, safety film isn't nearly as flammable as nitrate films. Unfortunately, its acetate base was found not to age well, with a tendency to become brittle, to shrink, buckle, and bubble, and to develop pink or blue casts. CB2's 4:3 aspect ratio is probably an emulation of 6x4.5 photography on type 120 transparency roll film.
  • Notched — emulates type 522 notched transparency sheet film in the 3A "postcard" size of 5½x3¼ inches — a little short of 16:9 aspect ratio — that was used from about 1908-1955, or a print from such a transparency. The frame indicates it's safety film, which Kodak introduced to sheet film in 1939. The specific notches are the Kodak code for safety-film Kodachrome prior to 1949. (Example on page 6 of this review.)
  • Vinyl — emulation of an LP record album "cover". Square.
  • Paper — a basic 3:2 (4x6") paper border showing a little wear. (Example on page 8 of this review.)
  • White Slide — emulation of a standard 2x2" slide holder with a 3:2 35mm transparency. Far more border than picture.

Really Old Photos

Styles for emulating really old photography:

  • Autochrome — emulates autochrome, the first significant color photo system.
  • Saloon — high-key monochrome with white vignette.
  • Silver — tinted monochrome, including split-toning, with drastically reduced contrast.

Notable filters for emulating really old photography:

  • Autochrome II — an autochrome emulation with much more adjustability.
  • Cyanotype — an emulation of cyanotypes.
  • Explorers — faded sepia-toned monochrome, with Paper border (3:2 aspect ratio crop).

Notable borders for emulating really old photography:

  • 75mm Strip — emulation of Lumière Wide movie film, circa 1898-1900, with 5:4 aspect ratio crop. An early movie film format (monochrome, of course).