Accessory Review: Manfrotto Solo VI DSLR Holster Bag

Manfrotto Solo VI DSLR Holster Bag
$45 / £35 www.manfrotto.us 

The Manfrotto Solo VI DSLR holster bag is a member of the company's Stile collection, a lineup that's composed of fashion-conscious camera totes. Holster bags are ideal for photographers who want to be able to unsheath their cameras quickly, while not sacrificing the added protection of a serious camera bag. The Solo VI represents Manfrotto's premiere holster model, and accommodates a full-frame DSLR (a short-body model like the 5D Mark III, as opposed to a professional model with integrated vertical grip) with a 100-400mm lens attached. More compact models like the Solo IV and Solo II can house DSLRs with 17-55mm and 18-35mm-type lenses, respectively. 

The internal compartment of the Manfrotto Solo VI measures in at 16cm (6.3") L x 12cm (4.72") W x 24cm (7") H, which is ample space to fit a 'short body' full-frame camera like my Canon EOS 5D Mark III, with a 24-105mm lens attached. I was able to extend the lens to the full 105mm focal length setting and there was still over an inch of volume left over at the top. However, there are some 400mm lenses that are absolute beasts and I'm not sure the Solo VI would be able to handle them. In that regard, it's best to err on the side of caution and plan on using the Solo VI for more conventional focal lengths (or try before you buy, if you get the opportunity). One thing to note is that unlike some bags, the Solo VI does not have a velcro-based lens strapping, but I found that was not needed since the camera fit snugly in place.

Style remains at the forefront with the Manfrotto Solo VI DSLR holster bag. The Manfrotto Solo VI is designed to accommodate a small-body (5DIII/D800 style) full-frame DSLR with up to a 100-400mm lens attached.

Externally, the Manfrotto Solo VI is a sexy number, flaunting the company's arrow-inspired bag logo via a raised stitching pattern along the main flap of the bag. This flap contains a rugged aluminum buckle that connects to a plastic male fitting at the bag's base. Nuances like a cylindrical rubber Manfrotto logo and embossed Manfrotto tripod logo on the buckle add to the general feel of a stylish, and deliberately styled product. For durability and security, all panels of the Solo VI bag are fortified with stiff foam material, which also adds cushioning to the camera and contents. There's a solid nylon handle at the top of the bag for an alternate carrying option, and the zipper system is top qualiy.

I only have a few gripes with the Solo VI, the first being that I wish Manfrotto had added some sort of padding to the bag's strap, as it tended to dig into my neck. Unfortunately, this can't be remedied by just swapping for another strap because the Solo VI's strap is sewn into the body of the bag. As a result, you'd need to get pretty creative to make this strap comfortable when you're carrying around the weight of a camera and lens. Also, there are no external pockets on the Solo VI; even the flap is devoid of a zip pouch. I think the Solo VI would benefit from at least a pair of mesh zip pouches on either side.

I used the gimmicky 'Pocket' pocket for storing memory cards rather than the company's branded mini tripod. Quick release is the name of the game with the Manfrotto Solo VI holster bag.

Internally, the Solo VI offers a sleeve that can accommodate things like batteries and memory cards, but not much more than that. Manfrotto also stitched a 'Pocket' pocket into the sleeve, designed to hold the company's 'Pocket' branded DSLR tripod. I saw no need for the Pocket... pocket, especially since it's a borderline useless accessory for someone shooting with a large DSLR. I stuffed memory cards in there instead.

I also think Manfrotto missed an opportuinity to increase the internal storage space by neglecting to sew a few sleeves or pockets onto the inside of the main flap. When the flap is raised to unsheath the camera, its underside is the most accessible portion of the bag. Having a few pockets in that location would make the bag more versatile.

Summing Up

The Manfrotto Solo VI holster bag is undeniably swanky and very well made. It can accommodate a short-body full-frame DSLR with a walkaround lens attached (Manfrotto claims up to 400mm) and performs just as advertised, enabling photographers to whip out a Mark III or D800 at the drop of a hat. However, the Manfrotto Solo VI trades style for function in a few key areas, namely the lack of external sleeves/pockets and omission of a neck strap cushion. The latter can be fixed with a little ingenuity, but photographers who are looking for the creme de la creme of storage-happy holster bags might want to look elsewhere. 

What we like: Superb build quality, scintillating style, accommodates full frame DSLRs with larger lenses, 5-year warranty after registering online.

What we don't like: Lack of pockets/sleeves, no cushion on strap, 'Pocket' pocket is gimmicky and unnecessary, unless you own a Manfrotto 'Pocket' Tripod. Price is a bit steep, compared to other models with more storage options.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 96
HeyItsJoel
By HeyItsJoel (Oct 2, 2012)

Manfrotto Man Purse disguised as a camera bag.

0 upvotes
LachieC
By LachieC (Oct 2, 2012)

OK, I took 90 seconds and made a little image about the logo :)

http://imgur.com/9FiCJ

-lachieC

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Oct 2, 2012)

When I wrote "bag logo," I referred to the stylized version of the company's tripod logo. The outer legs are tapered on the bag. But at this (moot) point, I think I'll set down the hair-splitting knife and go shoot some pictures...

0 upvotes
LachieC
By LachieC (Oct 2, 2012)

I see no tapering, but yes let us take more pictures :) I saw some stuff on your flickr, that house by the sea looks stunning!

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Oct 2, 2012)

Thank you! Those were from a recent real estate shoot.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Oct 1, 2012)

As free advertising goes, this isn't that bad. If you can get people to pay $3000 and then walk around with a strap that says Nikon, this is pretty tame by comparison. My Canon strap (which stays in the box) even has the model, so if anyone wants to grab it, they know they're getting a full frame camera.

0 upvotes
Banana Chips™
By Banana Chips™ (Oct 1, 2012)

Guys and gals...I think we are all glossing over its one important feature: since the Logo looks like an arrow, it serves another purpose: you can put a Post-It that says "Photographer Wannabe" or simply "Douche" on the latch beneath the arrow. Everyone wins.

I keed, I keed.

P.S.
No, I won't be caught dead touching this bag...let alone use one.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
1 upvote
50m31
By 50m31 (Oct 1, 2012)

As for style that looks like every other black bag. Also that is a lot to lug around with no padding on the strap.

Personally I like a bit looser fit for my camera when in a bag. That camera looks very tightly set in there. Granted padding and tight fit have benefits and place too, but I find a camera is tightly set in the bag it can be a pain and a bit dangerous to pull out if I can't get my hand in there easily.

0 upvotes
brent collins
By brent collins (Oct 1, 2012)

Unsheath? Quick release? Anybody else picking up on the tone here? ;-)

0 upvotes
LachieC
By LachieC (Sep 30, 2012)

"...flaunting the company's arrow-inspired bag logo..."

I think you'll find the Manfrotto logo is a tripod mate.

I'd also implore you to try those little pocket tripods; I have the smaller one for more compact cameras and find it invaluable, even on a 'heavy' RF setup.

The lack of shoulder pad on the strap is a bit of an oversight but there are options from other companies (I think crumpler?) for pads you could easily fit on.

-lachieC

1 upvote
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Oct 1, 2012)

Manfrotto has two separate logos--one destined for tripods and the other, which you see on the bag, for their bag line.

0 upvotes
LachieC
By LachieC (Oct 1, 2012)

Not really, they have the Red circle with the 3 legs and head piece, on the bag its just stretched big and sort of embossed. I'm currently sitting in the biggest Manfrotto dealer in the southern hemisphere. This logo is something we're familiar with.

What did you think of that steel buckle? We've had mixed reports about it.

You should check out that leather roller bag, it's pretty sweet.

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Oct 1, 2012)

The steel buckle, while flashy, is only for looks. It's almost dangerous, actually and always clangs about when you're putting the camera in the bag or taking it out. I also found it odd that the bottom of the buckle is a flimsy plastic. I guess it's an acquired taste.

0 upvotes
increments
By increments (Oct 1, 2012)

Maybe amend the review to reflect that? (Especially as others have reported it actually damaging screens etc.)

0 upvotes
Laurentiu Todie
By Laurentiu Todie (Sep 30, 2012)

That should deter theft and if it was the designer's intention—priceless.

0 upvotes
mischivo
By mischivo (Sep 30, 2012)

No matter what anyone tells me, I'll never find a "modern" cushioned neoprene/nylon camera holster or bag to be properly stylish. Give me retro or contemporary, made from either leather or unique fabric, and with COLOUR! And maybe then, if well designed, it could be called stylish. This bag, like most other camera bags, is rubbish to look at.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
WayneHuangPhoto
By WayneHuangPhoto (Sep 30, 2012)

Despite a few minor lingering design faults, Domke bags are my favorite. Stylish. Rugged. Protective.

0 upvotes
thedips
By thedips (Oct 1, 2012)

I will say very few pull off the ballistic nylon look. And god do I love my domke!!!!

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Sep 30, 2012)

The picture captioned "Quick release is the name of the game with the Manfrotto Solo VI holster bag" shows (in the inset diagram) one of my pet hates in camera bag design:

Notice how the (male) half of the buckle, attached to the bag, flops down. It does not need this freedom of movement, it serves no purpose. All it achieves is to necessitate two hands to secure the buckle - one hand to hold the male end in position, the other hand to fasten the female end over it. WHY?

Why can the part of the buckle attached to the bag be surface mounted so that it is constrained in a 'receptive' position, instead of flopping about uselessly and inconveniently? And it would be better that this be the female end, to avoid it snagging or prodding things which brush against the bag (like a loose knit jumper, etc).

Instead all they do here is just to repurpose a closure system designed for two ends of a belt without thought to how it (does not) work in this context.

4 upvotes
Jeff Peterman
By Jeff Peterman (Sep 30, 2012)

OK, I'm confused. At the start of the review, it says that the bag can take a 5D with 100-400mm lens attached, but it was tested with the MUCH shorter/smaller 24-105mm lens. That, and the apparent outer dimensions of the bag make me seriously question whether it could take a 100-400mm bag.

A review should at least verify the manufacturer's claims, and in that case I think it would have failed.

In any case, I personally don't like holster-style bags - their slimmer fit makes then much less functional than regular bags only a little wider, and the latter allow room for a small flash, a small second lens, or other items. My personal favorite for that is the Tamrac Velocity 7 sling bag - which is pretty small, yet can hold a 7D, 10-22 lens, 17-55 f2.8 lens, and a 55-255 lens - with pockets for spare battery, memory cards, and other small items.

1 upvote
vandal76
By vandal76 (Sep 30, 2012)

Had one of these, replaced it when that clunky metal buckle cracked the screen on my camera... terrible bag !!!

1 upvote
Craig from Nevada
By Craig from Nevada (Sep 30, 2012)

I have to agree with those who readers who suggest that a comparative review would be more helpful. Camera bags tend to be a tradeoff of sorts--size, price, features,quality of construction, etc. How people order these features is matter of personal taste. The bag is nice So are many others. Why is this bag better than the others?

I like to see how products stack up in comparison.

2 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Sep 30, 2012)

I keep a camera bag longer than I keep a camera. Get the bag wrong and it becomes a chore to carry the camera, or awkward to extract the camera. Result - camera stays at home, or stays in the bag, more often than otherwise.

There are zillions of bags out there, all shapes and sizes, weights and features, useability, style, format, etc. My head spins. So a decent comparative review would be very welcome, regularly updated.

BUT - the reviews must be the result of serious use of the bag, preferably by more than one person. I want to know will my shoulders ache after all day use, alternative ways to carry the bag (hip is my favourite), quirks, intended and unintended consequences of the design, etc all in a concise format. And lots of pics.

A decent index/search is also needed - to search for bags by feature/capacity/format etc.

On a lighter note, will we see posters wailing that their *ideal* camera bag has just been launched, but by the 'enemy' brand? ;)

2 upvotes
Craig from Nevada
By Craig from Nevada (Sep 30, 2012)

I agree with you 100%. I have a bunch of bags and the only way I know is by using the bag. Much like a pair of shoes.

I have a Lowepro camera pack. I like a lot of things about it--except the zippers operate with this string things that are knotted and quickly become unknotted on the trail. I have to retie it (tough with nylon cord) or put the cord in the bag and fix it later. It really annoys me.

Next time I get a bag with real zippers. Lowepro is no longer a first choice with me.

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Oct 1, 2012)

It would be fantastic if DPRev had a bag "feature search" and "side-by-side compare", just like with cameras and lenses. :)

0 upvotes
increments
By increments (Sep 30, 2012)

"What we like: scintillating stye"

Am I missing something? It's a black bag with an embossed logo. Pretty much the same as any other black holster bag.

As a general note, I think bag reviews are a great thing to do.

They do need lots of pictures of different configurations, and be done after having used the bag for an extended period of time to see how well it holds up to use and abuse.

1 upvote
Markkow
By Markkow (Sep 30, 2012)

I have been reading this website for a couple of years and I just made an account to comment about the whining that exists on this website.

How self centered are you that just because each and every thing posted on this website isn't customized to exactly what you want and only what you want you feel you have to throw a tantrum like a three year old.

Why don't you put your big boy pants on wait patently for the people who run this site to provide you their expertise FOR FREE!

5 upvotes
criticalhippo
By criticalhippo (Sep 30, 2012)

Mostly agree. However, I thought the wording of the review made it sound too gushing in places. Obviously no-one would want to see regurgitated press releases appearing as reviews on such a well-respected website, and I was briefly worried that this was such a beast.

Posting short, unjustified comments sniping about something a writer has spent time on seems childish to me too.

Personally, I don't think the review mark can be justified from some of the bag's failings noted in the review (the strap's rubbish, for example). Unless this was an accidental cross-post from Cosmopolitan, of course... :-)

0 upvotes
wwwOKCOMEONcom
By wwwOKCOMEONcom (Sep 30, 2012)

the cover is too long & it would be better if the opening faces the user

1 upvote
JackM
By JackM (Sep 30, 2012)

Tamrac Velocity bags correct both issues.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
pgphoto_ca
By pgphoto_ca (Sep 30, 2012)

After 10 minutes....you will break your neck....it's not confortable!

0 upvotes
Vetteran
By Vetteran (Sep 30, 2012)

Who cares? Really. What a frivolous post and insignificant product. Pathetic.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 30, 2012)

What would you like to see instead?

2 upvotes
Scales USA
By Scales USA (Sep 30, 2012)

I'd like to see more like this, Barnaby. There is a shortage of decent reviews of camera bags.

I'd also like more information about camera / lens combinations that will safely fit.

3 upvotes
Macro99
By Macro99 (Sep 30, 2012)

...It's European!

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Sep 30, 2012)

Caselogic design is heaps better.

http://www.photomartuniversity.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Caselogic.jpg

.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (Sep 30, 2012)

Accessory de jour is all well and good, but I would prefer seeing some reviews and articles abut flash-which has become so unbelievably expensive.

1 upvote
Gary Dean Mercer Clark
By Gary Dean Mercer Clark (Sep 29, 2012)

Like to see a holster style bag designed to accommodate those of us that shoot with a long lens with a battery grip on the camera. I don't like shooting with a long lens without a more subtantial battery grip on the camera for better balance and comfort in shooting. I don't think this bag looks like it would accommodate a camera with a battery grip on it. Would be nice to see.

0 upvotes
Blackfjord
By Blackfjord (Sep 29, 2012)

Sony's brilliant MO: IF you can't beat 'em, buy 'em.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
richardalanfox
By richardalanfox (Sep 29, 2012)

My current walk around kit is Nikon D800E with a 24-120, this fits perfectly into a Think Tank Digital Holster 20 v2.0.
The strap is removable there are exterior pockets and it comes with a rain cover.
I have many other bags and many other cameras, but when I go out for the day the camera goes into the trunk of my car and stays safe and clean until I need it.
Walking around too the case weighs almost nothing and can tuck into my belt and out of the way.
Highly recommended.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Dan Ortego
By Dan Ortego (Sep 29, 2012)

Two Cents: I have that TT-DH v20 for my A900/ZA135 and it fits pretty well collapsed without the hood. Works well for tossing it in the car and go. I unzip the bag, mount the hood and it works fine. I also have the TT Sling-10; it’s perfect for the 70-200 with the tricked-out shoulder sling. The Retrospective-7 'Pinestone' was pretty much a dud but we all have a least one that didn't work out. Hopefully I’m done with bags for a while.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JonSr
By JonSr (Sep 29, 2012)

if u r 2 satisfy my addiction, u gotta increase content output at least 2 fold. pump out stuff faster.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Sep 29, 2012)

You gotta love the model's tatoo...

0 upvotes
Island Golfer
By Island Golfer (Sep 29, 2012)

I agree with the post by Andreas Stuebs. Comparison of several different bags, with a current popular camera and lens combination in mind (i.e. D800 + 24-70) is much more helpful. Perhaps Manfrotto, Think Tank, Tamrac and Lowepro AW series, etc.

0 upvotes
darkref
By darkref (Sep 29, 2012)

I bought a smaller version of this bag (Manfrotto solo II), and I do not like it (I had no choice, it was the only bag big and small enough). The metal buckler is pointless, it weighs the bag down (it can't stay up on its own) and can scratch anything as you pull your camera out. On the smaller versions at least, one side of the neck strap is sewn to the bag, so it is not removable. There is no padding on the bottom, the zip line is not on a horizontal plane, which makes unzipping and zipping needlessly tricky. Good quality, and looks great.

1 upvote
Optimal Prime
By Optimal Prime (Sep 29, 2012)

This type of review does nothing to silence the critics of this site' content nor dispel any Impression that dpreview is falling behind in reviewing new cameras/lenses. Especially when there is already a high number of articles from outside contributors.

Comment edited 35 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 29, 2012)

You are reviewing everything why not laptop cameras or even borescope cameras !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 29, 2012)

Or endoscope cameras!!!!!!!!! where will this madness end???????!!!!!!!!!

Please stop.

11 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 29, 2012)

it's more like drifting than madness (if you like madness ii's ok with me ) (borescopes are endoscopes, endoscopes is a term used for the human body) (i'm sure you have your reasons to prefer the term endoscope) !!!!!

1 upvote
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 29, 2012)

stopped !!!!!

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 30, 2012)

is this about the gxr endoscope module ? nice hint guys ! :)

1 upvote
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 29, 2012)

This review thing is getting ridiculous !!!!!! in short while you'll be reviewing photo cameras belts !!!!!

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 29, 2012)

Maybe we will. Why not? We're a photography website, we'll review anything we can, if we think it's relevant. Why this this ridiculous? These reviews are being written by external contributors, it's not stopping us from covering anything else.

13 upvotes
HSway
By HSway (Sep 29, 2012)

Just the idea of reviewing borescope cameras poses a health risk so I speak for not doing that type of things.

0 upvotes
pdcm
By pdcm (Sep 29, 2012)

So you guys are really thinking of reviewing camera belts. Oh come on!. You know dam well we want lens reviews, yet you waste precious time and space putting up this kind of stuff which we don't want. This site continues to get worse and is now starting to become an irrelevance.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 29, 2012)

No, we're not thinking of reviewing camera belts.

And lens reviews are on the way. No lens reviews were harmed in the publication of this contributor-sourced accessory review.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
ecm
By ecm (Sep 29, 2012)

Nice to see another type of photography review at DPR - I hope we see a lot more of these quickie accessory reviews. Just the right length; not a lot of BS; the "like-dislike" part is golden.

That said, this Manfrotto bag has been done, and done better, a decade ago. Check out the Tamrac Velocity sling series if you want something that'll actually be your "go-to". My Velocity 6 is on it's third dSLR in 8 years, no signs of stopping yet.

2 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 30, 2012)

a re typed press release?

0 upvotes
Andreas Stuebs
By Andreas Stuebs (Sep 29, 2012)

Can someone please explain to me why this camera bag was singled out to be reviewed as an individual item? Wouls it not be better to have a group test of similar bags from different vendors?

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 29, 2012)

That'll come, worry not.

2 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 29, 2012)

id ontwant to have big manfrotto logos on my fotogear, thats like the camerastraps that have e cameraname and type written all over it.

thats like: " hey, anyone gonna rob me now or what?"

a photobag for me has to look like a normal shoulderbag like the crumpler bags, so i can carry my gear around in the middle of the night without a 5k pricetag on it for anyone to see.

also what about the chromed metal part, so i cant wash them in my washing machine without ruining my machine because of a metal part.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 29, 2012)

"Nuances like a cylindrical rubber Manfrotto logo and embossed Manfrotto tripod logo on the buckle add to the general feel of a stylish, and deliberately styled product." Hmm, in that cast I just gotta get one.

This drivel - a "cylindrical rubber Manfrotto logo..." - says it all really. And yet they omitted to put any padding on the farking strap. Given the astonishing plethora of nearly identical products available you have to come to the conclusion that these manufacturers think they can sell us almost any old junk if they gussy it up enough.

0 upvotes
HSway
By HSway (Sep 29, 2012)

Nice stylish toploader. I am using another one of Lowepro AW 70's, the last version is well worth the upgrade. The bag remains fully operable with total rain protection on and the tough nylon the cover is made of can withstand heavy rain and some abuse. What’s a real joy to use is well-shaped and padded internal compartment (like in a good car). Once we tried that we swapped the previous version in that moment. Can’t imagine anything better for a frequent, routine and quick pulling out/putting in than a toploader. Choice is good, not everyone needs it built like mountaineering equipment.

Hynek

0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 29, 2012)

Yet another bag that offers the tantalising promise that it will enable us to lug around a stage-weight DSLR without discomfort. It won't. Buy a lighter camera.
Roy

4 upvotes
Charlie Jin
By Charlie Jin (Sep 29, 2012)

This is 21st Century. There must be a bag that will significantly reduce the weight of DSLR to the level of P&S ;-) At least the "feeling of weight" ergonomically ... that is...

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 29, 2012)

not true, every good wide strap on any bag will reduce the pressure of the strap. simple physics.

@seeroy or get used to it. why would you buy a new camera because of weight? dont get it

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Sep 30, 2012)

@Charlie Jin
The bag can't reduce the camera's weight of course, but it can reduce the weight carried by your back shoulders, which is what matters most.

Your back and shoulders were not really designed as load bearers - so it is no surprise that they ache after a day carrying one of these bags.

Far better to carry the weight on your pelvis so that basically just your legs carry the load - they were designed to do that! But so precious few camera bags have a properly designed and constructed hip-belt. This example looks like a total failure to me.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
tongki
By tongki (Sep 29, 2012)

I don't think this topic is relevant for dpreview class,
or should I say dpreview already lost their class
since they reviewed an iphone, nokia, toy cameras ???

come on dpreview, this is SUCKS !!!

1 more thing,

NICE TATTOO !!!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Shelly Glaser
By Shelly Glaser (Sep 29, 2012)

There is nothing wring in reviewing Nokia, especially if their built-in camera is actually better than some "dedicated" cameras. People who use cameras must use camera bags, and we need to know which are the better ones and which are just overpriced.

On the other hand, it would be nice to have reviews of medium format cameras, particularly in these days where some DSLRs (D800, Merril) claim to give the same kind of image quality.

I would skip the review on thenew lunatic Hasselblad, though...

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 29, 2012)

ok so they are not supposed to tell you when camera bags come out? why not? why do you blame this site for the fact that no new camera model was released yesterday?

also this is a free camera review site, why do you blame this page for nokia releasing camera phones?

one more thing: tatoos suck, all of them

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Sep 30, 2012)

@tongki, go start your own review site if you disagree with the choices this one makes. It's not like dpreview has a finite number of articles and this one takes up space that would otherwise have been used for a review of a product you are interested in. You could have just chosen to ignore the article - why didn't you do that?

0 upvotes
GeorgeZ
By GeorgeZ (Sep 29, 2012)

Ok I have to ask this: is there absolutely no commercial interest by dpr or amazon to do these reviews over camera reviews when there are 25 camera previews waiting?
Not that they are not informative but given the huge backlog I'd whish you'd concentrate on cameras.

0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Sep 29, 2012)

...note the reviewer. This is not a regular reviewer. (I think?) I'm sure the main DPR staffers are up to their ears in gear reviews.

2 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 29, 2012)

Seriously, I have to explain this again? Mike isn't a camera reviewer for us. He doesn't work in the same office as us. He doesn't even work in the same STATE as us. HE WRITES SHORT ACCESSORY REVIEWS FOR US.

The output of camera reviews is entirely unaffected by this content.

And @GeorgeZ - if you seriously think anyone makes enough money from the tiny cut of a small number of sales that result from a handful of accessory reviews per month to significantly change the editorial policy of one of the biggest websites on earth... well, you're wrong. This is just another type of content for people to read (or complain about, apparently).

5 upvotes
Robert Holloway
By Robert Holloway (Sep 29, 2012)

I use a Domke multi lens bag and don't get these single lens bags. Probably my fault though.
If you have a single body and single lens, why put in a bag at all?
Rob

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 29, 2012)

because you probably dont want to run around with a 5k body hanging around your neck at 3oclock in the morning?
or in the rain? or in a demonstration?
or any other situation where you put your camera in your bag? ^^

i for myself cant understand people that are runing around with dslrs over their shoulder or neck with a 10-500zoom the built in flash extracted and no bag with them.

and those guys look so proud with their 500$ bodiesh anging from their necks, while i have two D3s in my bag standing next to them, and guess who will be robbed this night ?

a camera is supposed to be in a bag, untill you take a photo, and then put it back again.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (Sep 29, 2012)

Or maybe, just maybe you could actually grow a pair and stop living your life in constant fear...?

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 30, 2012)

hehe grow balls ... funny

so thats the reason why all you guys wear your d3100 with a plastic zoom around your necks ... now i get it ... but honestly i thought of something like that hehe

0 upvotes
owenleve
By owenleve (Sep 29, 2012)

cute purse

0 upvotes
Island Golfer
By Island Golfer (Sep 29, 2012)

The Manfrotto MB SH-6BB Black SOLO VI HOLSTER was a very big disappointment. It is made with a smooth (as opposed to ballistic) nylon, much like a purse. The zippered closure is sewn so close to the opening that it is virtually impossible to zip, or unzip, it with or without the camera inside. The camera and lenses mentioned will fit (barely) with the lens hood reversed. But, you must litterly stuff the neck strap into the case, and force it closed. The outside flap has a buckle closure that has a plastic piece pushing into a metal piece. It is a broken buckle, waiting to happen. The shoulder strap is wide enough (and, of ballistic nylon); but has no padded sleeve for your shoulder. Manfrotto should stay with designing tripods. If anyone wants one of these, I will sell my brand new one to you for $30 and pay the price of postage myself.

4 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 29, 2012)

thats exactly what i was thinking, the buckle closure alone should tell you to stay away from this bag and buy crumpler or lowepro instead. also i like gitzo tripods way better

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Sep 29, 2012)

The absence of external pockets and the unpadded strap are kind of a bummer on what otherwise looks like a nice bag. Unfortunately those are two features I've gotten used to with my Lowepro bags. Out shooting, you'll always have filters, clothes, memory cards, batteries, etc. Having someplace to put accessories, especially in a bag zoom bag that will most likely have no extra room in the main compartment is essential.

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Charlie Jin
By Charlie Jin (Sep 29, 2012)

Do you know which one of the Lowepro is similar to this ?
I need just this size (it's just perfect for me), except the
padded strap. Thanks.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Sep 29, 2012)

The Lowepro Top Loader Pro 75 looks fantastic, but there are a number of Lowepro Top Loader bags for about the same price as this Manfrotto bag.

0 upvotes
GPW
By GPW (Sep 28, 2012)

All of Manfrotto equipment is overpriced. I am in the process of replacing my Manfrotto tripod, monopod and heads with the much better and cheaper Induro brand. I own the Induro AT413 tripod and it kicks Manfrottos butt in terms of build,stability and price.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 28, 2012)

'All Manfrotto equipment is overpriced'.

Really?

4 upvotes
babola
By babola (Sep 29, 2012)

I agree that Induro is one of the best new manufacturers of camera support equipment, but Manfrotto has been around for a long time and used by many leading photographers for decades.

Manfrotto could be a little on a pricey side, that's true, but the same can be said for Gitzo, Arca swiss, Really Right Stuff products to name the few.

That said Induro (parent company of Benro) has some of the best tripods, monopods and heads money can buy these days. I own their carbon fibre CT214 tripod with BH2 head and couldn't be hapier - lighter, packs shorter and fits insde my rucksack perfectly, but when it comes to indoor shooting venues I tend to always pull my Manfrotto 055PROB out of the bag with 468MGRC2 head on it.

0 upvotes
Karl Gnter Wnsch
By Karl Gnter Wnsch (Sep 29, 2012)

@GPW, I agree. I tossed my Manfrotto gear into the metal recycling bin because I couldn't bring myself to lie enough to be able to resell it. So I took quite a hefty loss but switching to a combination of Novoflex, Feisol and Berlebach tripods and heads did make a heck of a difference. Recent Manfrotto products not only are too expensive, in parts they are far worse than previous models.
IMHO the reason for their products to go backwards is to protect the premium brand in their parent company lineup - Gitzo...

1 upvote
Younes B
By Younes B (Sep 28, 2012)

I wander what thought process lead to review this bag rather than the numerous other similar bags on the market?

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 28, 2012)

New, stylish, serious photography credentials, not too expensive....

We've got to start somewhere ;)

6 upvotes
Anfy
By Anfy (Sep 28, 2012)

+1 for Mr. Britton!

2 upvotes
EmmanuelStarchild
By EmmanuelStarchild (Sep 29, 2012)

I'd much rather see a review on their 055 class carbon fiber tripods. I'm in the market for one.

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 29, 2012)

yeah you gotta start somewhere, but with a bag from a tripod manufacturer instead of a bags company ? at least strange.

1 upvote
darkref
By darkref (Sep 29, 2012)

It makes sense to review these bags, as they are new on the market, not like lowepro who have been around for a while and their bags are already mostly great as everyone knows. This is the alternative.

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 30, 2012)

@Emmanuel: I just received the 290 series Manfrotto Carbon tripod and will have the review out soon. A few parallels can be drawn between the 290 and the 055, especially build quality.

0 upvotes
duranaf
By duranaf (Oct 6, 2012)

Greetings. What alternatives to this bag on the market?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 96