Lightroom 4 Review

Map module

The Map module leverages GPS data with none other than Google Maps to provide visual location information for your images. If your camera records GPS information, using Maps requires minimal effort. Select the geo-tagged image(s) in the filmstrip and the map automatically updates to show the location at which the image was captured. You can also import GPX tracklog data and have images automatically tagged based on date/time stamps. Once tagged, a metadata panel displays the GPS coordinates for the selected image and the map provides road, satellite, hybrid and terrain views. You can zoom in far enough to see cars on the street.

The Map module provides a visual reference of all of the locations for which your images have been tagged. Each orange pin displays the number of images tagged with that location.

Manual geo-tagging

Smartphones aside, few photographers at this point are capturing GPS data with their images. To this end, Lightroom makes the way that most of us will begin using the Map module - by manually geo-tagging our images - a relatively simple affair.

With images selected in the Filmstrip, you can type in an address or location, just as you would in the web browser version of Google Maps (note that an Internet connection is required). A yellow search result marker is then placed on the map at that location. You can tag images with location data by dragging and dropping them from the Filmstrip anywhere on the map or by right-clicking a location on the map and setting the selected images to that location. An image pin denoting the number of images tagged with those specific GPS coordinates is then placed on the map.

You can find a location simply by typing into the Map module's search bar. Using the map's zoom slider you can control the precision of the geo-tag for your images.

Once you've dropped images onto the map, Lightroom automatically fills in the appropriate coordinates in the GPS metadata field. Additionaly, you can enable Lightroom to use reverse geocoding whereby it attempts - via the Google Maps engine - to fill in neighborhood, City, State, and Country information automatically based on the GPS coordinates. This feature can save a lot of typing if you're placing pins on urban cities or popular destinations. Obviously, in more remote locales, reverse geocoding will not be as accurate. This feature does involve the transfer of specific data from your computer to Google's servers. You can enable/disable the feature at any time via the Catalog Settings preferences.

Searching by location

While there's no denying the satisfaction of marking a map with all of the places you have photographed over the years, the real pleasure comes after you've tagged your images. That's because you can use the map as a search tool. Clicking on an image marker automatically makes a selection in the Filmstrip of images matching the GPS data. In addition, a small image window pops up, allowing you to scroll through thumbnails of the entire set of selected images.

Each image shown in thumbnail view becomes the 'most selected' image in the Filmstrip, allowing you to go straight to the Develop or Print modules with that image populating the main image window.

You can create saved locations (shown below) which makes adding future images to those same coordinates fast and easy. Perhaps of equal importance though is that you can set a saved location as private.

The Private option is checked for this saved location. When exporting images associated with this saved location, none of the location data will included with the exported version.

Click here to continue reading our Lightroom 4 review...

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 480
1234
TOENEE60
By TOENEE60 (Jan 12, 2012)

Superb article......Thank you!!
Tony

2 upvotes
Pedal2Floor
By Pedal2Floor (Jan 12, 2012)

Back when LR3 was released I put in a feature request for a book module and there was a lot of support for my request from adobe forum members so I am happy that it made it. Also great idea to integrate with Blub but I hope there is a way for 3rd party developers to integrate with MPIX or others as well.

There were many who also asked/requested for a Calendar module as well. I am happy to see the book module (a much needed feature) but disappointed we will not also get a Calendar module. I believe for many a book and Calendar module would have been huge features. Hopefully someone will create a plug-in

0 upvotes
hea
By hea (Jan 12, 2012)

Everythinh Ok, except I do not see a control to move ALL exposure up or down, just like we use aperure , speed or ISO. This is essential for me. The first rough adjustment I currently use.

0 upvotes
willardp808
By willardp808 (Jan 16, 2012)

OMG...there IS someone who actually uses Aperture :)

0 upvotes
Cerrito Kid
By Cerrito Kid (Feb 10, 2012)

Yes, there are still Aperture users out here in the real world. Which is better Aperture 3 or Lightroom 3? Answer -- assuming you have a MAC -- has a lot to do with the way you approach your "work flow" (hate that term, never heard it used in a darkroom) which can be highly personal and as well as the type of photography you are doing. I have both products (lightroom came free with my Leica) and see pluses and minuses in both. However, at $80 Aperture is by far the better bang for the buck. If you use a PC, well good luck with Lightroom because that is all you have.

1 upvote
BMWX5
By BMWX5 (Jan 11, 2012)

Does anyone know when it is going to be released? Is it safe to install this beta beside the full version in MAC?

0 upvotes
opusjeff
By opusjeff (Mar 7, 2012)

Apparently, the comment section of this article was continued from the Beta review article.
If you would have looked closely, you would see that his question was made months ago when the Beta was released.
Who's the idiot now???

2 upvotes
eNo
By eNo (Jan 11, 2012)

Oops, no 32-bit support, no XP... I just saved myself some money. I guess it's 3.6 until my PC or I die.

5 upvotes
Lea5
By Lea5 (Jan 12, 2012)

Hey it's the year 2012. XP was released 2001 (!) and was outdated years ago. Time to get Win7

7 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (Jan 17, 2012)

Having to change O/S because of an image editing/organising bit of software is ridiculous. It is a piece of cake to design software to deploy on different platforms if done properly. I was slowly getting into LR 3 but I won't be wasting my time any further. I did wonder about buying into Adobe and kind of expected an ongoing need to buy upgrades every now and again but never expected to have to buy a new O/S and potentially screw up my PC that is running nicely in the process.

2 upvotes
Archiver
By Archiver (Feb 6, 2012)

What's worse is that Adobe will no longer make upgrades to LR3, which means that I would have to upgrade to a new OS if I buy a new camera and want to use the raw files natively. DNG Converter is okay but the files can become massive with certain cameras.

1 upvote
SungiBr
By SungiBr (Feb 12, 2012)

They droped 32bit support only to Macs. On windows you still can run it on 32 bit processor. But an upgrade to a Win7 is definatelly not a wast of time and money

0 upvotes
Vytra
By Vytra (Feb 18, 2012)

@Dave and eNo - I hate to make this a discussion about operating systems, but saying Win7 isn't worth the upgrade from XP is like saying you hate technology, faster computers, and more efficient workflow. Holding out on XP is reserved for people that have never used an Win7 PC. The difference is starkly favorable towards Win7 in all terms of performance, speed, stability, capability, expansion, potential, and future development. Make the upgrade to Win7.

7 upvotes
kantucky
By kantucky (Mar 6, 2012)

Just found out a few minutes ago that it does not support XP. I'm really surprised seeing that as of Jan. 2012, XP still makes up 32% of the market. One third of all computers are still running Windows XP. That's a bunch of computers!

2 upvotes
Virvatulet
By Virvatulet (Mar 6, 2012)

Windows XP / x64 provides the entire necessary infrastructure for program development and its stability, efficiency and reliability are proven phenomenal now that Microsoft has been working on it for a decade or so. It is the de facto fastest Win platform, do the tests with similar HW and pro SW like CAD/CAM/CAE etc. or just compare simple "cold start to open document" times.

The pressure towards change is primarily about forcing sales economics and media industry driven DRM, it has nothing to do with the usability or viability of Win XP. I personally don't like waiting for the computer, so the fastest OS is the way to go. I'm using Linux besides XP in my production environment and the switchover will preferably take that route if possible.

2 upvotes
sean000
By sean000 (Jan 11, 2012)

Soft proofing and book editing will be welcome additions. I create a fair number of photo books, and it will be nice to do so from within the LR interface so I don't have to browse for or import images.

My only concern is that this will be the Lightroom version that finally demands that I upgrade my modest computer. More modules will demand more memory. On the one hand I hate to see LR get even more bloated than it already is, but on the other hand the reason I love the workflow is because I can accomplish almost everything I want to do from within a single application that always has access to my catalog. It's probably time for me to upgrade the computer anyway...

0 upvotes
moving_comfort
By moving_comfort (Jan 11, 2012)

Just wanted to comment on the preview here itself - very well written, very complete and clear. Well done.

14 upvotes
JasonReplica
By JasonReplica (Jan 11, 2012)

Having worked professionally with LR since the first beta I think the team deserve for listening to users and finally getting soft proofing into the app. This was one of the major gripes for me. However...
I've just found a new gripe to replace it. If you've got a lens that has a profile defined for it and the chromatic corrections are accurate then your going to be happy BUT if you have a lens that isn't profiled and requires a manual correction for chromatic corrections then it looks like you're out of luck. The sliders have disappeared from the manual section altogether so no manual correction can be dialled-in. Please Adobe give us back the manual chromatic adjustments!
Any just in case you're wondering it's the Nikon 28-105 lens that I'm very fond of and know many other photographers enjoy using on the D700 and D3 bodies.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Jan 10, 2012)

I'd like to hear a reply to a question already asked: Where is the option to linearly shift the tonal range, aka ISO, or LR3 exposure? I use it a lot because I prefer to underexpose on purpose rather than increase the camera's ISO, at least with the most recent Sony sensors.

0 upvotes
DJenson
By DJenson (Jan 10, 2012)

Thank you Amadou for this very detailed write up; it's much more helpful and informative than the information I received from Adobe.

7 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 11, 2012)

Thanks for reading. Glad you found it helpful.

0 upvotes
JeffGo
By JeffGo (Jan 11, 2012)

Totally agree. Amadou, a great job as always. I played with the beta a little yesterday and now I understand things a lot better.

0 upvotes
LS3
By LS3 (Jan 12, 2012)

The most helpful, clear, concise explanation yet -- and perfectly targeted to cover what Beta users need to know. Thanks!!!

0 upvotes
JensR
By JensR (Jan 10, 2012)

Wow, RGB curves, finally! Highlight recovery with (seemingly) much less colour skewing! Geotagging with track import! I might have to abandon XP after all this time.
PS: Good review, thanks.

3 upvotes
elai
By elai (Jan 10, 2012)

When will they add real fullscreen picture preview. Picture fills to the entire screen, you can use hotkeys to move through your library and mark pictures. Really simple thing that almost every picture displaying program has. Best you can do leaves a large GUI "bezel" around the screen.

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
RedHotLama
By RedHotLama (Jan 10, 2012)

Would like to see support for multiple users. This is a big problem for multiple computer users and studios.

I have solved it at home by putting the catalog with all the pictures and not storing it on the computer. But would be nice to have multiple users/computers access same catalog at the same time.

Also would like to not have to use PADDY to get keyboard adjustment. Would like the facial recognition too.

But those are all wishes, and this looks like a really nice update.

Like being able to move multiple folders at the same time.

1 upvote
Bobjay
By Bobjay (Jan 10, 2012)

Well written preview !

4 upvotes
e_dawg
By e_dawg (Jan 10, 2012)

The new local adjustment features sound great, but let's not forget that one could already do most of that in LR3.

For example, local WB is performed by choosing the color you want to shift the local area towards. If the local area is too cool, you would simply select an orangy color and brush it on. If it's too warm, you would brush on a bluish color, and so on. It's like using a CC or 8xA/B/C series filter for your lens to match tungsten/daylight/FL lighting to your film/flash/etc or gelling your lights/windows. Might be complicated for those not used to this, but it's second nature to those who are used to dealing with mixed light sources with film.

Local NR is definitely a welcome addition, as it was a lot harder to implement without a dedicated slider, but you could still brush on a combination of negative clarity and sharpness with brightness/contrast adjustments to "hide" the noise in areas of uniform tone and structure. Still, i'd rather have the local NR slider.

0 upvotes
Yanko Kitanov
By Yanko Kitanov (Jan 10, 2012)

Hi,

Thanks for the review! Good work!

Is there any information available weather Adobe plans to release some film imitating curve adjustments, or perhaps general Lr presets? I don't mean something as comical as someone's film presets available at forums or some more general plugins including poor attempts to reproduce film looks like the ones from Nik or Imagenomic, what I mean is something more serious - like the work Raw Photo Processor developers did in scanning and analyzing thousands of images to be able to reproduce a really good film look at RAW level with supreme IQ. Or perhaps there are some 3rd party options...?

Have a great day/evening!
Yanko

0 upvotes
Yanko Kitanov
By Yanko Kitanov (Jan 11, 2012)

I am sorry to see that there is no answer to my question at DPR.

0 upvotes
thelensmeister
By thelensmeister (Jan 11, 2012)

Try these: http://visualsupply.co/

0 upvotes
Archer66
By Archer66 (Jan 10, 2012)

Dont care about books, maps or video but otherwise looks to be a must have release.

0 upvotes
Kwik-E-Mart
By Kwik-E-Mart (Jan 10, 2012)

Looks good so far. Love the geo-tagging. Great summary (typical DPReview greatness) that led to as many good questions as provided answers. But, with 4b downloading in the background, I'll soon know the answers.

Will be interesting to see how presets translate (or don't).

One major omission: facial recognition. I know it's considered a noob feature and Adobe won't get into it until it can be done really well. Not everyone will use it, but for those of us with thousands of pictures of some of the people in the library it would be amazing.

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Lift Off
By Lift Off (Jan 10, 2012)

Here's something I didn't get:

Imagine that you have a saved preset that had a value of contrast of +35 (that was just +10 than the default's +25 from Lightroom 3). Right? Now, when using it on Lightroom 4, will this same preset be adding +35 to the contrast, or just the correct +10 (which was the original intention)??

Hope I was clear enough.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 10, 2012)

When updating PV2010 images with manual slider values to PV2012 Lr uses not identical numbers but tries to transpose them to an 'appropriate' value. But your image will undoubtedly look different.

1 upvote
Lift Off
By Lift Off (Jan 10, 2012)

Thanks for the reply, although I don't think updating an old image is the point here (or maybe I didn't completely understand your answer).

I'm talking about a fresh new raw file, opened only on LR4: in that case, will an old preset work correctly?

It's probably not that big an issue and they surely thought about it, but I was curious about that specific case.

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

It's a very big issue with presets you already own.

0 upvotes
Lift Off
By Lift Off (Jan 10, 2012)

I want to believe they thought it through before changing it...

0 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 11, 2012)

Presets created in PV2010 will behave as I described with manual adjustments made in PV2010 when applying them to PV2012 images. it's going to be the rare image that looks indistinguishable in both process versions with a PV2010 preset applied. You're going to end up making new presets for PV2012 images. Unavoidable as even the tools common to both versions work differently.
Best recommendation is to use 2012 primarily on newly imported images or ones you have not edited yet. If it already looks great in PV2010, leave it alone.

0 upvotes
Lift Off
By Lift Off (Jan 11, 2012)

Ok, noted. Thanks for clearing that up.

0 upvotes
TheChefs
By TheChefs (Jan 13, 2012)

Also after playing around with it, it looks like you can convert PV2010 images to PV2012. When you do it you have the option of viewing the old and new image side by side.

At that point you can decide if you want to proceed with PV2012 or stay with PV2010.

0 upvotes
bmlsayshi
By bmlsayshi (Jan 10, 2012)

You mention the fill light option is being removed. What is it being changed to? Would I up the highlights instead?

0 upvotes
bmlsayshi
By bmlsayshi (Jan 10, 2012)

Anyone? Please? This is important to me because its the feature I use the most in Lightroom...

0 upvotes
Lift Off
By Lift Off (Jan 10, 2012)

That is a good question... I will miss the "Fill light" option and the simple "Brightness" as well.

0 upvotes
bmlsayshi
By bmlsayshi (Jan 10, 2012)

I managed to find some info http://forums.adobe.com/message/4128170#4128170 and http://tv.adobe.com/watch/whats-new-in-lightroom-4-beta/develop-module-advancements/

0 upvotes
Curt Gerston
By Curt Gerston (Jan 10, 2012)

I suspect that's now the Shadow slider. I hope so.

0 upvotes
JavaJones
By JavaJones (Jan 10, 2012)

You would simply increase the Shadows slider, thus brightening your shadows. But, unlike "Fill Light", the effect would be much more clearly limited to the shadow areas, which in general is desirable. If you want an image to be brighter overall, you would increase exposure or Whites. You really have to try the new controls, they are - in my limited experience thus far - quite nice and a definite improvement.

1 upvote
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

In LR's favor, I will say that local WB and NR are features I'd like to see in Aperture. Even so, I think I read that LR uses Noise Ninja tech, and I find that Topaz Labs' NR is much better. Oh, and for those of you pining for a heal brush, Aperture has both heal ("retouch") and clone brushes with both auto- and user-selected source, find edges, and variable brush size and feathering. And, while Aperture doesn't have layers, it achieves similar results by enabling brushing on of most any adjustment, post-selection variation of strength (think "layer opacity"), and multiple iterations of any adjustment (think "multiple layers").

OK, sorry, I'm a die-hard Aperture fan. I think the UI is cleaner and more efficient, and it makes my high-volume editing & post-production of event work a snap. I'll pipe down now.

0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

In the end though it is the final results that counts and that is where Lightroom has always one over Aperture. It gets more out of files.

When you look at Lightroom 3 compared to Aperture 3 Aperture lacks the most basic of brushes which is 'exposure'. It's nearest brush is a combination of brightness/exposure and the results from that are not as good.

It will be interesting to see if Apple respond to Lightroom 4 and if so how. Very hard to tell at the moment after the mess they have made of the Final Cut update. Will they dumb down Aperture as well?

0 upvotes
Jeff Spirer
By Jeff Spirer (Jan 10, 2012)

LR has a healing brush, it was there in LR3 also.

1 upvote
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

What, exactly, are you referring to when you say that LR "gets more out of files"? I'd be interested to know the results if you've actually done a careful comparison. I haven't, so I don't make those kinds of blanket assertions. And, I kind of doubt that you have, either, given that the "brightness/exposure" brush you mention doesn't exist. So, let's talk about what we know rather than what we believe. It is true that in Aperture you can't brush on adjustments made in the White Balance or Exposure bricks. Those are the only two, though. And, if, as you say, it is the final results that counts, then this is of no consequence. Every other adjustment can be brushed in or out, in multiple iterations (i.e. "adjustment layers"). If I want to adjust luminance or contrast in an area, I can brush in or out a Curves, Contrast or Levels adjustment. Likewise with color, sharpness, definition ("clarity"), highlights & shadows, and even vignette & devignette.

0 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

Jeff, in an earlier post, Fixx implied that LR has only a clone tool, not a healing brush. Is this not correct? I'd expect it to have both, so I was surprised by the post. AP certainly has both.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

I did not say it was called a brightness/exposure brush. What it does is a combination of this and it is called the Dodge Brush. It does not just increase the exposure and therefore can leave what you could describe as a halo effect sometimes. This is because it is also increasing brightness. This is a known issue in Aperture 3 and comes up in forums very often. The fact that it does not just effect exposure does have a consequence. To be able to control exposure with a brush is the most important brush a lot of photographers will need in software.

1 upvote
James C. Murray
By James C. Murray (Mar 6, 2012)

Are there any changes to the sharpen and noise reduction features? I ask as I cannot see any mention of them in the review.

0 upvotes
Dolan Halbrook
By Dolan Halbrook (Jan 10, 2012)

Kind of surprised there's still no facial recognition for tagging.

1 upvote
Kwik-E-Mart
By Kwik-E-Mart (Jan 10, 2012)

I agree. This would be my number one feature request. Even if it wasn't perfect.

0 upvotes
Sevventh
By Sevventh (Jan 16, 2012)

I agree, even if its not perfect like the one in Picasa it will save alot of time

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

I was expecting more. Most of the new features have been in Aperture 3 for over a year. Separate point-curve adjustments for R, G & B channels? Old news. Book layouts and built-in ordering? Old news. Soft proofing? Very old news. Geolocation? Old news. And, some of the changes to adjustment tools seem to be substituting an algorithm's judgement for the user's. I don't love the auto highlight recovery - I'll make that decision, thank you very much. Making the exposure adjustment target the midtones rather than shift the entire tonal range takes away control. I often use exposure, highlight recovery, brightness and black point adjustments in tandem to finely control overall brightness and contrast. The new approach seems like it's been dumbed down for tyros. Also, when viewing a single image, Adobe still wastes screen real estate with a preview image. Why? Honestly, with Aperture available for $80, I don't see why DPR hasn't reviewed it, or why any Mac user would bother with Lightroom.

2 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 10, 2012)

You're free, of course to use any raw editor you want, but you're making incorrect assumptions about the PV2012 changes. Take a few of your PV2010 images, reset them to their defaults in PV2012 and try the new Basic panel tools, in order. Yes, its a new workflow to learn, but once you do it's arguably faster, more intuitive and you're not giving up any control, especially when you can fine-tune with the Tone Curve.

2 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

So, if I want to blow out the highlights, do the Basic panel tools provide a way to do it? That's pretty basic. Sorry, but for an old fart like me who cut his teeth on slide film, having an "exposure" adjustment not mimic the effect of varying the camera's ISO, aperture or shutter speed (i.e. shifting the entire tonal range in a linear manner) just seems counterintuitive. Hasn't Adobe effectively removed the old exposure adjustment and renamed the brightness adjustment "exposure"?

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

That is simple to answer more, pro Mac users use Lightroom because the tools are better and produce better results.

If you mean the preview image on the left, just turn it off if you don't want it.

0 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

If you're not going to cite specific examples, all I can say is that's not my experience, or that of my business partner, a 20-year veteran who migrated to Aperture after using Lightroom for years. To cite one specific example of better tools, he found Aperture's Highlights & Shadows tool much more flexible and effective, not only for recovering highlights and shadows, but also for managing midtone contrast. As for results, doing color-critical art reproduction work for a book to accompany an exhibition at a major New York museum, I was pleasantly surprised to find that Aperture's default profiles yielded more accurate color than ACR, even after using an Xrite Color Checker Passport to generate a custom profile. Sure, it's nice to have the option to use custom profiles in ACR, an option that Aperture doesn't provide. But, if the results aren't better, what's the point?

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

I have been using Lightroom for professional work since the first beta came out and like many I still find highlight recovery to be more effective in Lightroom compared to Aperture. I do a lot of theatre production photography and and the difference has been quite noticeable. Even my local Apple store staff photography specialist who do pro work on the side prefer to use Lightroom for similar reasons. On the print side files that I have given to clients for use in books and well printed magazines on good paper stock have matched without any problems. Only time there has been problems in that area for me the cause has always lead back to the printers.

1 upvote
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jan 10, 2012)

Not having tested both, I couldn't compare the effectiveness of highlight recovery in LR vs AP. Have you done same-image comparisons with current versions of both apps? My biz partner, who works with AP but still putters with LR, prefers the color from his D700 NEFs with AP. Again, I haven't done the kind of careful tests that would qualify me to compare IQ. What I do know is that I find AP's interface cleaner, and most of LR's "new" features are things I've been working with for a long time. As far as print matching goes, that's really more a matter of soft proofing (AP v1.0+) and good monitor calibration.

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 11, 2012)

Majikthize, if you want to blow out highlights, push the Whites slider to the right.

0 upvotes
Fixx
By Fixx (Jan 10, 2012)

Thank you for preview.

Curve tool looks promising. As good as in Photoshop?

When you explain work flow in basic adjusting, many of us rather set black and white point first, and mid tones after. Mid tones are handled by brightness&contrast; which in practice means curve elevation & S shape. Not sure if adding sliders will help (as there is already overlap in highlight recovery tools: whites and hightlights seem both to affect recovery). I guess this is a matter of taste and these tools work ok.

Have they done anything to HSL tools? Color manipulation has been subpar with that tool. It is impossible to target and change exact colours in image as there are no adjustment in targeting. Photoshop is here way ahead. Now, make HSL adjustable as in Photoshop and add darkness slider to target dark/mid/light ends of histogram. That would be state of art.

and....

0 upvotes
Fixx
By Fixx (Jan 10, 2012)

Heal tool! Really, there is no reason not to include it instead of simple clone. Should heal also missing edge pixels created by in distortion correction tools.

Web gallery plugins? We need one with HTML5 slideshow and one with simple namelist (without thumbnail), preferably with search function (like, having a list of 1000 persons and you can go to right name and fetch image). + www-commenting option for visitors in galleries. Third party plugins would be fine.

HDR and panos may be better handled by third parties. Please encourage them make LR plugins for their applications.

1 upvote
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

These 9 plug-ins for Lightroom all use HTML5. You might find one of these meet your needs.

1 upvote
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 10, 2012)

Fixx,
You're not going to be happy or working efficiently if you start by setting your endpoints first. The Lr workflow has always been somewhat different than a Curves-based Ps workflow. And in v4 you really, really, really want to use the tools in the order they're presented.
Don't confuse use of the Tone Curve with the role of Ps Curves. In Lr you achieve much of what you used Curves for in Ps with the Basic panel sliders. Tone Curve is for fine-tuning those results or, as I wrote in the preview, to make more creative adjustments.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

It's always been important with Lightroom from from Lightroom 1 to do things in the order they are listed to get the best out of the files.

Out of interest what happens with old presets with contrast settings built into them when you use them with Lightroom 4?

0 upvotes
gonzalu
By gonzalu (Jan 10, 2012)

I am salivating for the new features and localized options... but the video and book enhancements are going to be a big jump in the learning curve :P

0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

On video is it possible like you can with photos to copy settings you have made to one clip to another clip?

Also if you had a still from the footage you had adjusted in 'Develop' could you then copy those adjustments over in the 'library' module to a video clip? That way you could make adjustments smaller than a third of a stop of exposure for example.

It says you can also apply split toning to video. How do you do that if you can't access the 'Develop' module? Is there a new setting in the library module that we can't see in the screen shots?

0 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jan 10, 2012)

The things you want to do are possible if you use presets. Grab a still from the video, open it in the Develop module, make your changes, then save them as a preset. Go back to any video and apply your preset. It will be in the User Presets submenu.

0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Jan 10, 2012)

Thanks for getting back Amadou. That is useful to know and easy to do. I don't suppose you know where the split tones settings are for video?

Best preview I have seen so far as you go into more depth than other websites.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Jan 10, 2012)

GPS support.. finally!!!

the new version looks great. the best just got better.

im happy that they don´t waste time for HDR.
80% of all HDR images are crap anyway that only the creators like.

and there are great tools for HDR already.

same for panoramas.. if you really want to do panos you have to go for autopano or ptgui.

these features can be implemented when all others are perfected.

GPS on the other side is a crucial feature for a IMAGE MANAGEMENT solution today. great that adobe finally put it into LR.

0 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Jan 10, 2012)

Good preview thanks.

I may have missed it but is this a paid or free upgrade (to the finished version)?

0 upvotes
rfk101
By rfk101 (Jan 10, 2012)

Update from 2 to 3 was $99 / £90 if I remember correctly. The soft proofing tool (especially the "Create New VC" option) makes me willing to hand over the money asap, but I believe it will be 4-6 months before the beta goes live.

1 upvote
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Jan 10, 2012)

Thanks, I thought it would be a paid upgrade, still LR is the best I've found

0 upvotes
Photo-Wiz
By Photo-Wiz (Jan 10, 2012)

If they could only improve the Clone brush so that it works more like the one in Elements. The one in Lightroom is so cumbersome and difficult to use accurately.

2 upvotes
ihv
By ihv (Jan 10, 2012)

I was quite surprised not to see that included. Hopefully in the final version. If no other magic, at least movements must be allowed instead of spot fixing.

2 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Jan 10, 2012)

well adobe want to sell photoshop and elements.

you will not get all features you want into LR... that would be pretty stupid from adobes point of view.

i own photoshop so i don´t need cloning in LR.
i dont even use the brush functions in LR often.

local adjustments are done way better in photoshop.
i don´t think that will change.

0 upvotes
look
By look (Jan 13, 2012)

Henry, OK, to follow the logic, then LR must not have a host of tools it does have.

I would rate a proper healing and clone brush tool - be it content aware or a simpler version - a feature way above WB brush. The lack of it is just annoying and makes me look away towards Aperture. I am sure I am not alone.

0 upvotes
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (Jan 18, 2012)

Plus one. I find that those circular clone tools are a pain. I wish they would come in the form of a brush too, or that you have the option between choosing the circular tool (good for dust elimination) and a brush healing/cloning tool.

0 upvotes
Neil2112
By Neil2112 (Jan 10, 2012)

The good:
Better highlight recovery, new and more aggressive clarity algorithm, plays nice with video finally and I'm going to use the crud out of the added localized adjustments options. Thanks Kost, good work.
The ok: Maps. Some pros may use this, but the day I look at a beach shot and not know which beach it was is the day I have assistants doing all this for me. Books. Fab, but Blurb has BookSmart already, and you cannot make custom layouts(?!).
The not so good:
Same clunky grey modular UI with pop ups from all four sides that never ever behave the way you expect. STILL no keyboard shortcuts for adjustments (sorry, but I'm not paying over $600 for RPG Keys.) We have books and maps but no HDR and no panorama. I'd wear out the HDR button if you'd just give me one.
Overall, a net gain with some reservations. UI notwithstanding Lr still gives Aperture a good spanking.

0 upvotes
ir Bob
By ir Bob (Jan 10, 2012)

What is the spanking given to Aperture then? All the new features seem to be coming straight from Aperture, and you don't mention any other features that spank Aperture.

0 upvotes
RedHotLama
By RedHotLama (Jan 10, 2012)

Get a logitech gaming keyboard and PADDY (which will need an update for LR4)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2Y2MnM6RyA

0 upvotes
snapshotist
By snapshotist (Jan 12, 2012)

Hey Neil2112-

Great news! In LR4 Beta, you can use the Print module to effectively create your own, custom templates. View the 7:14 mark in the following video. It's a bit of a work-around, but if you aren't able to find a template you like (there's a ton of them), you have a way around the limit within the program.

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/whats-new-in-lightroom-4-beta/advanced-book-features/

Disclaimer: I am a Blurb employee.

0 upvotes
lamah
By lamah (Jan 10, 2012)

Does soft proofing allow the result of converting the image to the sRGB colourspace to be previewed? In Lightroom 3, the histograms are unhelpfully based on the much larger ProPhoto colourspace, so images can be silently clipped in sRGB with no warning on the histogram to help you out.

EDIT: Tried out the beta. Yes, it does! Woohoo! No more clipped reds on my red flower photos!

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Richard Tammar
By Richard Tammar (Jan 10, 2012)

Thanks for checking that out - much appreciated! Saturation shifts when exporting jpegs as sRGB (as viewed on my sRGB calibrated monitor) have been my number one gripe with LR. Good to know this is - at last - fixed.

0 upvotes
Thomas Karlmann
By Thomas Karlmann (Jan 10, 2012)

I am trusting that the Templates in Book creation are stated here as fixed, uneditable. I'll wait for a version that allows far better than this. I will never use a "fixed" template

0 upvotes
snapshotist
By snapshotist (Jan 12, 2012)

The templates are fixed, but adjustable. For example, you can add paddings to images and text to image layouts. You can set your images to fit an image container or fill an image container - and then optionally zoom in/out and pan the image around the container. There's a lot you can do.

All of that said, as I mentioned to another DPReview member in this thread, there's a work-around using the Print module in LR4 to effectively create your own, uniquely you layouts. Check out timecode 7:14 in the following tutorial video.

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/whats-new-in-lightroom-4-beta/advanced-book-features/

Disclaimer: I am a Blurb employee.

0 upvotes
conphi65
By conphi65 (Jan 25, 2012)

Is printing available to anyone outside of the U.S, you know; "the rest of the world"?

0 upvotes
Michael Foran
By Michael Foran (Mar 6, 2012)

In this, as in any other template "print on demand" service, you can always create your own designs using whatever software you like, and then export a flattened image to be printed full page. Not optimal, but it works.

0 upvotes
Dolan Halbrook
By Dolan Halbrook (Jan 10, 2012)

Yay for basic video tools!

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jan 10, 2012)

No panorama or HDR :(

2 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (Jan 10, 2012)

Well it can't do everything and given how much HDR sucks in Photoshop I can't see it's a bad thing.

2 upvotes
RDoe
By RDoe (Jan 10, 2012)

Agreed HDR is awfull in PS, but a exposure blending or layer stack would be very nice!!

0 upvotes
ed kelly
By ed kelly (Jan 18, 2012)

I use photo matrix as plugin in LR3. I've used it for years. I think it's great.

0 upvotes
AllC
By AllC (Jan 10, 2012)

Looks great, downloading the beta as I write to try all those cool features.
I was hoping for a content-aware spot healing brush though.

2 upvotes
look
By look (Jan 13, 2012)

Yes, that is a glaring disadvantage of LR for me. Spot tool is such a pain to use when trying to clone except for dust.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (Jan 10, 2012)

This preview was a lot of work and to the point. Kudos to all who worked on it.

16 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (Jan 10, 2012)

Great set of enhancements and additions. I've been wanting a localised WB and NR brush for ages. Hopefully detail slider in sharpening is less aggressive.

1 upvote
TEBnewyork
By TEBnewyork (Jan 10, 2012)

Thanks for such a good preview. Some very interesting and cool new functionality.

1 upvote
jwalker019
By jwalker019 (Jan 10, 2012)

Some great stuff here: soft proofing, local adjustment of white balance, updated / improved "Basic" functionality :) Can't wait to try it.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 480
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