Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon

Dirk Jesper is Product Manager for Professional Products and Product planning at Nikon Europe. Photo: Barnaby Britton

Nikon has had a busy year, launching several new products including two full-frame DSLRs, the 36MP D800 and the enthusiast D600, which offers a 24MP sensor. In a week when Canon announced its own affordable full-frame camera, the EOS 6D, Barnaby Britton caught up with Dirk Jasper, product manager for professional imaging at Nikon Europe, to get his opinion on the competition, as well as some more detail on Nikon's newest - and cheapest - full-frame DSLR.


Dirk - is the D600 the new D300S? In other words a bridge between your DX format DSLRs and high-end full-frame?

It's hard to compare the D600 to the D300S. I see this camera sitting between the D7000 and D800, which are closer to the D600 than the D300S is. It has a decent resolution - 24MP full-frame - and we've included some of the features of the D7000, in terms of accessibility, and the scene modes and so on, but also we have D800 technology like the HDMI output, uncompressed video recording, the metering capabilities, which are adapted from D800 and D4-level technology. The D300S is a different concept. It's a semi-pro DX system camera and [the D600] is an enthusiast camera. So really we're talking about two different types of product.

We expect to get some upgraders coming to the D600 from the D300/S, though, also D80 and D90 users, we have received a lot of positive comments from them. They are considering entering the full-frame system with the D600, because they think it's good value for money, it's something they've been waiting for, because the D700 was out of reach when they bought their cameras. The D600 can process information twenty times faster than the D700. It has double the pixel count, the color range and the dynamic range is better…

The AF system is taken from the D7000 - have you made any changes?

Yes it's the same module, but there have been refinements, especially in terms of the sensitivity. With this camera you can focus at a combined aperture of F8, which isn't possible with the D7000.

Is that because the AF array occupies a smaller area of the image circle in the D600? So there's no light drop-off towards the edges than there might be in the D7000?

No, it's really the internal technology itself, which has been changed. This is something new that has been developed for the D600. Thirty three out of thirty nine focus points can offer AF down to F8. This is incredibly good for an enthusiast camera.

The Nikon D600 offers a 24MP CMOS sensor, high-end video recording cabanbilities and a 39-point AF system (inherited from the D7000). The interface is a cross between the D7000 and D800, and all three cameras share the same battery. You can also mount DX lenses on the D600 for 10.5MP capture. 

What are the challenges in putting all this technology into an enthusiast-level product?

That is something you should ask the engineers! I think the melding of proven, existing technology and new, or recently-introduced technology was very difficult. To find the right balance. That was one of the hardest things. Incorporating technology into a new product is not such a big thing, but to find the right balance so it still hits the target price point, so it's affordable, that's the key.

How important is video to your target audience for the D600?

Not so important for 'classic' photographers, but we see a huge community out there, a group of customers that we have not addressed really before the launch of the D4, the D800 and now the D600. These cameras are now being used by the video broadcasting community. For the first time this year we attended a major broadcast conference in Holland, and we had really positive feedback, people were waiting for us to go there. The D800 was used to film the UEFA championships in Sweden, among others. We're entering new markets now. Dexter is now filmed on the D800, too, it's broadly accepted even in a field where we really never intended it [to compete].

How many enthusiast photographers will shoot uncompressed HD footage?

I don't know, I can't tell you. I think it is becoming more popular though. There will always be people who concentrate on stills, which is absolutely fine of course, but a camera is there to offer opportunities. Not to say 'you must go there' but to say 'you can, if you want to'. That's the idea.

The D600, like the D800 and D4, does not feature focus peaking. Why not?

Currently, no, we don't have an in-camera solution. If we're talking about 24MP capture, and 36MP, any minor focus offset is more noticeable than it might be on a 12MP camera, no question. Working in video, where focus peaking is used most, working at open apertures focus can be an issue. But there are solutions for the problem. If you're serious, there are external recording options like the Ninja from Atmost, this works really well with the D600 and it offers focus peaking, zebra-ing, everything you might want.

But the D600 and D800 are not video cameras, they are still cameras. They have outstanding video capabilities, so we get a lot of requests for extra features but it takes research, it takes development, we have to do this step by step. For us, video is a new space. I'm not saying no, but I can't say whether we can provide focus peaking in a firmware upgrade or not.

When Canon introduced the 5D Mark II, there was some surprise that its video capabilities ended up being so popular. Were you surprised?

No. We were not. Video creatives came to us very early asking when were going to have something for them.

What's your opinion of the Canon EOS 6D? You must have been looking at it pretty closely?

I cannot really comment much on competitive models, but if you look at the concept of the 6D, I think Canon has a different approach to us. With the D600 we are really concentrating on the photographic features and we're trying to give the best photographic package that we can. We've seen a lot of cameras with full-frame sensors released in the past ten days but my feeling is that all of them - the 6D, Sony's A99 and RX1 - all have a different approach, and represent a different concept to ours.

We are really concentrating on delivering something for the photo enthusiast - so for example it was important to include a 100% viewfinder, a good AF system with enough cross-type AF points, the ability to shoot with teleconverters and still focus at F8, a built-in flash… also, you can use the D600's flash as a commander in Nikon's Creative Lighting System. That is we've been asked for by our customers. And our 'want to be' customers.

Canon's answer to the D600, the 20MP 6D, offers a slimmed-down feature set compared to its big brother the 5D Mark II but offers compelling features like built-in GPS and WiFi. Ergonomically the 6D is a cross between the APS-C 60D and the full-frame 5D II, but the fixed screen and lack of built-in flash might surprise some Rebel upgraders.

Which of your customers were you thinking about when you first sat down to plan the D600?

We were really thinking about applications, not what a specific owner of another camera might want. So landscape photographers for example who want 'real wide angle' and feel that APS-C isn't the best solution, that was one of the main audiences we had in mind. The D600 is a full-frame FX format camera that is easier to carry around than the professional models in our lineup, but it's still weather-sealed, for use out in the wild.

Are you selling more D600s body only, or with a lens?

I don't know yet, we only just started to sell the camera this week but I expect initially we will sell more cameras without a lens. We know there are a lot of lenses out there, enthusiasts already have lenses that they can use with the D600, and they want to test these existing lenses before they buy new ones.

The D600 has an automatic DX crop mode that will let you shoot at 10.5MP with DX lenses. Do your customers actually do this?

I don't know, I don't have that information. But it is important for us to maintain that compatibility, and that's why we have the automatic DX crop mode when a DX lens is mounted. This year we reached 70 million Nikon lenses produced, and maybe say, 40 million of those are compatible with the D600. At least. This is an amazing number and I think this is a core benefit of the Nikon system - you have a future-proof, and long-reaching ability with all of the Nikon lenses.

Even second hand, or refurbished, a good lens is still worth its price, ten or twenty years later. Especially for enthusiasts, backwards and downwards compatibility is very important. Once you invest your money in a system it must be safe. You must get value for money. 

Comments

Total comments: 220
12
EssexAsh
By EssexAsh (Sep 20, 2012)

Dear Mr Nikon

Are you not slightly embarassed by the gouging of customers you carried out with the D800 D4 prices on release, while offering up the worlds feeblest of excuses? Are you actually aware how much the D600 will sell for? let us know now so you cant pop out the same excuse again.

Are you in any way ashamed of your quality control department which missed some blindingly obvious issues with the D800.

0 upvotes
lost_in_utah
By lost_in_utah (Sep 20, 2012)

The market determines the price as which Nikon can sell this camera. Don't player hate. If Nikon priced the D800 for $5k, it wouldn't get many sales. If the D800 was sold for $2K, it couldn't maximize profit. Nikon is in the business to make money, not be your friend. You sound immature and entitled. Sad. If you want a friend, get a dog.

5 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 20, 2012)

Yeah, for a $3,000 camera, please don't let your customer do Beta and Alpha testing and find some of these glaring issues (D800) -- after they pay the hefty price for the camera.

No clue at all now what the "issues" will be w. the D600, it would be superb if there would be none.

0 upvotes
lost_in_utah
By lost_in_utah (Sep 21, 2012)

Have you never paid attention to a new product launch? The smart person waits until the smoke clears to avoid the initial issues that may exist. No one forced anyone to purchase the camera after launch after much noise was being made about the AF issues. Early adopters pay a higher cost.

1 upvote
Tomskyair
By Tomskyair (Sep 20, 2012)

Hello Nikon,

I have always been appreciative of your concept of not just shunning legacy customers.

When shooting press back in the 90ies I was truly delighted to find out that my venerable Ai(S) primes could still be used with my newly acquired F4 and its superior TTL flash-metering.

Now I would be truly delighted if you would just put a capable modern DX-sensor (20-24 MP, superior high-ISO and excellent DR) plus the EXPEED 3 processor into the tried and tested D300(s) body while retaining its other semiprofessional features (high fps, 51-point AF, ultra-solid build).

Call it whatever you want, I'd preorder it on its very announcement...

8 upvotes
jwaif
By jwaif (Sep 20, 2012)

Barney,
It’s actually 3 full-frames in 2012. D4 was Jan 6th.
John

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
paulski66
By paulski66 (Sep 20, 2012)

+ the 800e...

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Sep 20, 2012)

Should have asked him about the Nikon 1 system and what he thinks of the RX100.

2 upvotes
keepreal
By keepreal (Sep 20, 2012)

Are you joking or is it only Nikon with the 1 system who are? They should stick to serious cameras or just point and shoot. The 1 is a zero as far as I am concerned.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Dabbler
By Dabbler (Sep 20, 2012)

I have both D800 and Nikon V1, among others, and I love the V1, especially being able to reach to 270mm with the 10-30mm, not to mention what I can do with the FT-1 adapter. It isn't a FF body but it takes some terrific photos. So as far as I'm concerned (in binary at least) the 1 is indeed a 1.

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 20, 2012)

Nikon 1-series was passable despite it's lamentable lens line-up until Sony launched its 1-inch sensor RX100. Nikon 1-series does not look all that good now, especially when value for the $ is a consideration.

1 upvote
smallcams
By smallcams (Sep 20, 2012)

That's a lot of "I don't know"s.

5 upvotes
paulski66
By paulski66 (Sep 20, 2012)

Yes, although a number of the questions were just stupid.

"Are you selling more with or without lens?" Um, it's been available for two days.

"Are enthusiasts using uncompressed HD video?" Um, it's been available for two days.

"Are enthusiasts using DX lenses with the D600?" Um, it's been available for two days.

Not sure how he was supposed to answer such questions...

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
11 upvotes
GiovanniB
By GiovanniB (Sep 20, 2012)

This interview reflects a very good approach towards their customers by Nikon, including respecting the wishes of owners of legacy lenses - talk of long-term commitment in opposite to ever-faster "innovation" cycles and planned obsolescence. Congratulations - in fact if I'd not be invested in a Canon full frame system already, I'd seriously consider returning to Nikon completely today (having been a Nikon user in the film era for some time, but I wasn't completely happy with their AF bodies and some of the lenses back then).

6 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Sep 20, 2012)

2013, will see Zeiss coming to the rescue for Nikon. Not that Nikon lenses need rescuing. Good chances that Zeiss has chosen Nikon to carry their optics to a new level on FF. Hold on to your D800E.

1 upvote
Jaybird1x
By Jaybird1x (Sep 20, 2012)

Yea, my Canon buddies have been drooling over the Nikon line for a couple of years.

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 20, 2012)

Right now, Nikon seems to beat the pants down off of Canon. Looks like Canon had nothing but bad luck with their bad camera releases in the past 18 months or so, no?

3 upvotes
RawDogg
By RawDogg (Sep 21, 2012)

Yes!

0 upvotes
dorff
By dorff (Sep 21, 2012)

Good design approach maybe, but only in this bracket. Which is why comment on the 1 system would have been interesting. Nikon is missing a huge opportunity there, because they seem incapable of realising that the same high regard for what photographers want would make the 1 system a must-have for many. Come out with a Z1 that does all the good things too, with the lenses that photographers actually want, and they will sell boatloads to guys like me. Can it be that difficult?

1 upvote
GabrielZ
By GabrielZ (Sep 21, 2012)

I completely agree with you there dorff. How ever much I'm fond of my DSLR system, many a time I wish I had a more compact, much lighter camera system with similar image quality. I know there's the 4thirds and Sony's NEX mirrorless systems available, but I'd prefer something similar from a professional company like Nikon.

0 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Sep 20, 2012)

This year is double Xmas for Nikon. They are standing way above the competition after the Photokina dust settles. I will remember 2012 with D800 and RX1.

3 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Sep 20, 2012)

Sadly as a Canon fan boy ( but I still have a Nikon FM from 1979) I have to agree - the 6D is yet another nail - unless it become real cheap (unlikely) Nikon will continue to eat away at Canon's market share. I feel this began with the D3/ D700 - pretty well until then Canon AF & high ISO was often better - now the tables have turned and Nikon continues to produce features that would help me take better pics - like a 39 point AF - not silly rubbish like built in GPS... a very depressed Canon owner....

6 upvotes
RawDogg
By RawDogg (Sep 21, 2012)

Sad Joe: You nailed it on the head. I will hang with Canon a little longer but Nikon is killing them. Come on Canon...step up to the plate and swing back...HARD.

2 upvotes
GabrielZ
By GabrielZ (Sep 21, 2012)

As a long suffering Canon user too, I unfortunately have to agree with you both.

0 upvotes
Chris Donnet
By Chris Donnet (Sep 20, 2012)

Why these corporate guys dont' seem to understand that some of us DO need DX systems?

3 upvotes
iAPX
By iAPX (Sep 20, 2012)

Specifically for the niche market I work for, hair stylists, and contests as Contessa, Mirror Awards or Naha, we absolutely need everything in-focus, absolutely no bokeh.

For that matter, I use D300s where DX (and f/11 .. f/13) helps to have absolutely crisp images. Some of my colleagues tried to obtain it using 5D Mark II, but even at f/16 there are part of the images that wasn't in focus, and over f/16 you began to loose crispness.

So I dream of a 16MP D400, still semi-pro with DX format.

5 upvotes
keepreal
By keepreal (Sep 20, 2012)

Since I can make fine quality A2 prints (ie. 60cm wide) from my D300, I am not in the market for any more pixels or even an FX camera. Many of those who trade up to the latest have more money than sense. You just do not need that kind of quality unless you are a professional and want A-5 size prints The "-" is a minus sign. Get the point?

0 upvotes
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Sep 20, 2012)

"So I dream of a 16MP D400, still semi-pro with DX format"

What's wrong with D7000? What a marvellous camera for stills, video department is another matter there.

1 upvote
Nikon Convert
By Nikon Convert (Sep 20, 2012)

Mr Nikon,
We really do need a Nikon D400 to upgrade our beloved D300's and to take on the Canon 7D. Please give a thought to your loyal Nikon DX followers!

14 upvotes
ssebi_m
By ssebi_m (Sep 20, 2012)

Well said!!!

1 upvote
Griffo 155
By Griffo 155 (Sep 20, 2012)

No need to upgrade d300/300s it's clear to me that Nikon are relying on the d7000 and upgrades of that to do the job... The only thing to my mind it's smaller in the hand... I was reliably informed that the 7000 was a better camera than the d300s in any case... For the amateur enthusiasts it's clear to me that Nikon are pointing you to use d600 and upward from now on... Get your wallets out for new lenses guys to take advantage of full frame!

0 upvotes
iAPX
By iAPX (Sep 20, 2012)

D7000 is not a semi-pro camera, and it was clearly stated by Dirk Jasper! Where is my flash sync output?!?

3 upvotes
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Sep 20, 2012)

on the top of the camera.

2 upvotes
Rage Joe
By Rage Joe (Sep 20, 2012)

And by the way iAPX, "professional" or not - who cares - D 7000 has way better sensor and DR compared to any other Nikon except D800 and D800E, and most likely this new one.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Old Ed
By Old Ed (Sep 20, 2012)

Regarding focus peaking, this is a BIG DEAL to MF lens users, even if video is not involved at all.
It's very nice that the D600 can do AE with AI-S lenses; but AE obviously does not eliminate the need to FOCUS. And if the D600 follows earlier models, there is still no USEABLE MF focusing aid. A dim, flickering dot low in the viewfinder is total bleep.
BTW, focus peaking is not the only solution. I would be very happy if Nikon would just BRIGHTLY light in-focus AF points, when in MF mode. That has GOT to be an easy firmware upgrade, and has been for years. But still nada.
It may sound like a conspiracy theory, but what excuse could there be for leaving out focus features so simple, cheap, and valuable? I can only think of one: Nikon would still like credit for supporting older lenses, so they offer up AE (on higher end bodies). But they don't actually want to detract from new AF lens sales, so they cripple MF focusing ability.
How about DPR calling them out on this, Barney?

10 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 20, 2012)

I did, actually (I have edited down my original question to keep things concise). Dirk's response is above. Nikon sees this function as primarily a video tool, but they're not ruling out adding it to the feature set.

4 upvotes
Old Ed
By Old Ed (Sep 20, 2012)

Hi Barney, Thanks for a good interview, and for your courteous reply to my comment! As you can tell, I feel strongly about the MF focus aid issue; and I hope DPR will bring it up prominently in the D600 review. IMHO, being able to focus is an essential CAMERA tool, and not "primarily a video tool."
I might also point out that back in the days when camera bodies had only 10 or so "features" (vs. the present day 1000 or so), FOCUSING ability was one of the 10. So I would argue that a useable MF focusing aid is not just #1001 in an long list of superfluous features; it's an ESSENTIAL feature.
Thanks again, and happy shooting, Ed

8 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Sep 20, 2012)

lighting up a focus point as it hits focus in MF would be a fantastic feature - I have a drawer full of MF FF lenses from my film days, the 600mm f8 Cat lens in particular is real pig to focus. The D800/600 can detect focus on it owing to their great f8 focus ability, but like Old Ed says, squinting at the green dot really does not cut it.

8 upvotes
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (Sep 20, 2012)

It¨s remarkably that only Sony has this feature (peaking mode) of all brands. Correct me if I have wrong.

1 upvote
Tape5
By Tape5 (Sep 20, 2012)

Ed, I often wonder what type of photography would we have today if we did not deviate from a simpler smaller-numbers type of photography and focused on the image.

You talk about ten choices in the gone days, I think with our 1000 choices these days at least in this regard, we have gone backwards.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
CopCarSS
By CopCarSS (Sep 20, 2012)

Pentax has focus peaking on the K-01 and K-30, Elaka.

3 upvotes
Jaybird1x
By Jaybird1x (Sep 20, 2012)

Nice but not necessary.....I have been shooting the D300 since it was introduced. I use the AIs primes and macros when shooting fixed objects and my AF pro zooms when shooting things that move. This is perfectly acceptable and it is seldom that the green dot fails me. I cannot imagine a manual focus situation where I would get a good focus hit rate on moving targets. I was hoping for the green dot with arrows like the pro backs. I'll know in a day or two just how good the new view finder and low light focusing is as my D600 arrives today.

0 upvotes
Griffo 155
By Griffo 155 (Sep 20, 2012)

Sony are going to try everything to turn their poor shop around for them - I've used this focusing aid from Sony and in my opinion it's not what's it cracked up to be its a gimmick and it got in my way... Nikon have faith in their lenses to focus correctly, those users that have manual lenses, the classics, well that's what they are Manual focus lenses and users will not want to have an auto focusing tool will they?

0 upvotes
misspiggy01
By misspiggy01 (Sep 20, 2012)

i´m not sure what focus peaking would be like on an slr with an OVF. if i´m using the lcd on the d800 then i´m on a tripod and use the zoom buttons for focus which works perfectly. also i´m not a fan of these annoying red lines in my image.
for video, it´s a different matter, but if you can´t focus your mf lenses through the OVF you sould go check your glasses.

0 upvotes
Old Ed
By Old Ed (Sep 20, 2012)

Hi Jaybird1x, It sounds like you have never used an MF lens with a really good focusing aid. (The classic aid towards the end of the film era was the split-image with microprism surround.) Try one, if you get the chance, and you'll see what this "thread" is about.
And consider this: Before AF lenses became practical in the mid to late 80's, ALL (focused) photos were MF. And there were plenty of successful captures of moving targets during that first 100 years or so of photography. There would have been a lot fewer such captures if photographers had been taking their eyes off their subjects to look for flickering dots.
IMHO, there is no good reason that cameras can't provide MF focusing aids in 2012 that are as good as the ones produced 25 years ago. YMMV, of course.
Happy shooting, Ed

2 upvotes
Old Ed
By Old Ed (Sep 20, 2012)

Hi Tape5, Thanks for your comments. It was really quite lovely "back in the day," to concentrate on the image itself, and not worry about sRGB, or AF error corrections, video codecs, compressed vs. uncompressed RAW, etc., etc.
Of course the modern equipment also has its charms; but simple elegance isn't one of them. It would be nice if someone offered cameras that tried to produce a simpler, cleaner, more effective tool by seriously culling unnecessary digital gimmicks. Perhaps Fuji is going down that road. Happy shooting, Ed

0 upvotes
Jaybird1x
By Jaybird1x (Sep 20, 2012)

Hi Old Ed,
You are right I have never used MF lenses with an aid since my film days. But I shoot birds in flight and 5 yr old grand kids with AF glass that is almost as good as the primes. At 70 AF is just so much easier than trying to twist a focus ring. Now if I get into video with the new D600 and use my MF lenses than a focus aid may be a good idea. But I think I would probably move to something like the Ninja 2, I think it's called.

0 upvotes
chris_j_l
By chris_j_l (Sep 20, 2012)

"and all three cameras share the same battery"

If other makers could see how damn useful this is...

4 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Sep 20, 2012)

Sony gets it. The same NPFM500H battery has been used (or compatable with) the A100,A200,A300, A350, A450,500,550,580,A57,A65,A77,A850,A900, and A99 DSLRS for the last 6 years.
More makers ought to do this I think, it does make a difference of pleasing the consumer.

Carl

9 upvotes
Griffo 155
By Griffo 155 (Sep 20, 2012)

Yes Sony does get it it means the body of the camera will have to remain the same size 'cos of the battery! No you have to move with the times if a smaller battery is available with the same output then fit in the camera... That's the way it goes. Do you remember the first mobile phone with the battery on a shoulder pack! What would it be like if we kept to the same size battery then to now even if it did a decade of usage...!

2 upvotes
Rooru S
By Rooru S (Sep 20, 2012)

Griffo 155

The SLT-A33/A35/A37/A55 all share a smaller battery. As you say, that allows the body size to be reduced and everything seemed right, but then since many people already have chargers, backup batteries, accesories using the same type of batteries, etc, people complained about the change, even if that means a reduced size body. That's why Sony went with the bigger battery on SLT-A57. They still use the smaller battery size for the entry level SLT and NEX-series (excluding FS, EA and VG series)

1 upvote
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (Sep 20, 2012)

It's good to be king.

2 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 20, 2012)

What are you king of?

1 upvote
stuntmonkey
By stuntmonkey (Sep 20, 2012)

" is the D600 the new D300S"

Love how Barney indirectly asks if there will be a D400, and then the question is indirectly shirked off.

3 upvotes
Jaybird1x
By Jaybird1x (Sep 20, 2012)

I have been shooting the D300 since it was introduced and will have a D600 today. As I think about it I was hoping for a choice between a D400 and D600. However, a point made in this interview speaks to the difficulty of matching a feature set to a price point. It seems that 10+mp on the D600 in DX mode will perform better than the D300 all things considered. And for $900 more 15mp in DX mode on the D800 will certainly satisfy the D300 crew. Now that I have looked at the D600 manual I am really wondering if there will ever be anything like a D400. I would not be surprised to see DX SLRs disappear to be replaced with something mirrorless in the 24mp iso 6400 space. With all the competition this is rough space for the market planners.

0 upvotes
misspiggy01
By misspiggy01 (Sep 20, 2012)

i think a d400 replacement will be announced after enough upgraders have bought the d600. they are always introducing the bigger model first so the early adopters can´t choose the cheaper option. and once you´ve gone FF you´ll most likely never go back to dx.
i think it´s another 2 years until a mirrorless with f-mount. if it comes at all. but since the guy in the interview has been going on about lens compatibility they might just pull it off. if they do they will rule the photography world.

1 upvote
msu79gt82
By msu79gt82 (Sep 20, 2012)

I too have been shooting a D300 since 11/24/07 and have long waited for a "D400". Today I ordered a D600. Not saying I'm done with DX, but I'm disappointed in Nikon's current commitment level.

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
mrp1124
By mrp1124 (Sep 20, 2012)

FP - they mean that when you put a lens whose maximum aperture is f/8, the d7000 will not autofocus. This is usually the case when using teleconverters. Think of an f/4 lens with a 2x teleconverter on it. The d600 will still allow you to focus with this combo, which is really nice for wildlife photographers!

4 upvotes
fastprime
By fastprime (Sep 20, 2012)

Can someone explaing/expand on what he meant when he said:

"With this camera you can focus at a combined aperture of F8, which isn't possible with the D7000."

Thanks,
FP

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Sep 20, 2012)

He explains a bit more later. Since you lose field of view when going full frame (on the same lens), you often try to get some back with a teleconverter. But a 1.4x teleconverter adds 1 stop and a 2x adds 2. And since you often need to stop down one or two stops to recover sharpness, you end up at a combined aperture of f/8.

Which does not AF well on the D700. But it will with the newer FF bodies.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
kevin_r
By kevin_r (Sep 20, 2012)

When the maximum available aperture is f/8. For instance if you use a 2x teleconverter with say the 200-400 f/4 lens, you end up with a maximum available aperture of f/8 instead of the f/4 that that lens supports without the teleconverter.
It does not refer to the fact that lenses can be stopped down to f/8, i.e. you choose a setting of f/8 for the lens.

0 upvotes
mrp1124
By mrp1124 (Sep 20, 2012)

Kim, that's not what they mean at all for the f/8. It's not about stopping down. You can stop an f/2.8 down to f/8 and it will autofocus just fine. The aperture blades don't actually close down to f/8 until the shutter is released. So when you are looking through the viewfinder, the lens is always set to the largest aperture (therefore letting in the most amount of light for autofocus). Hope that makes sense!

0 upvotes
S777
By S777 (Sep 20, 2012)

I'm guessing with the D7000 if you use a slower lens and an extender, if the combined f stop is F8 or less then you will lose auto focus.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Sep 20, 2012)

As replied, it's about a long zoom, f/5.6, with an extender (2x), it becomes f/8 maximum.

0 upvotes
joejack951
By joejack951 (Sep 20, 2012)

A 2X TC on an f/5.6 lens makes it f/11. You get f/8 by adding a 2X TC to an f/4 lens or a 1.4X TC to a f/5.6 lens. nikon does not make any lenses slower than f/5.6 hence the reference to "combined aperture".

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Sep 20, 2012)

I won't comment on my competition, but we pretty clearly destroyed them don't you think? LOL

16 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Sep 20, 2012)

I've always shot Nikon because I think they "get" the enthusiast better than anyone. And the bodies don't feel like slabs of wood or like toys :-)

5 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Sep 20, 2012)

Not a Nikon fan myself but I just found his "no comment, but here's an insulting comment I specifically said I wouldn't make" a little juicy.

But yeah, I do think the D600 has a leg up on the A99 and 6D. Not really in the FF market though so my opinion is irrelevant.

Comment edited 57 seconds after posting
1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Sep 20, 2012)

@mosc
what insulting comment did he make about the Canon? All he said was "I think Canon has a different approach to us". Everything else he said was about his own products.

I thought he was very gentlemanly about it - invited to pass judgement on the competition he brushed aside the invitation with a diplomatic and uncontentious "they are different to us".

16 upvotes
bocabum
By bocabum (Sep 20, 2012)

It would have been a great time to ask Dirk when the D300s replacement will be available!

Dirks comments - The D300S is a different concept. It's a semi-pro DX system camera and [the D600] is an enthusiast camera. So really we're talking about two different types of product.

When will the replacement be available?

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Sep 20, 2012)

And what about Auto ISO function? Is it as good as Nikon D800 or poor as Nikon D7000?

1 upvote
mrp1124
By mrp1124 (Sep 20, 2012)

Superka, what is the difference between the d7000 and d800 auto ISO? I use a d300s and like what it does.

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Sep 20, 2012)

All Nikon's Auto ISO function exept D800 (at last) doesn't take into account current focal length. DPreview has mentioned this several times in their reviews.
Auto ISO function was much more clever in Canon cameras, and only D800 is good, even somehow better then Canon's

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
George E620
By George E620 (Sep 20, 2012)

The Nikon sales blurb ( http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d600/pdf/d600_20p.pdf )
indicates Auto ISO is somewhat like the D800(not clear if 5 settings or just dummied to less useful 1/focal length):
"Auto ISO with auto minimum shutter speed control
When using the Auto ISO feature*, the D600 automatically
controls your minimum shutter speed based on the focal
length of the lens being used. This can be very helpful
in reducing camera shake by raising ISO sensitivity, and
particularly advantageouadvantageous when shooting with a zoom lens."

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
ahmadelnemr
By ahmadelnemr (Sep 21, 2012)

TOO MUCH "I Don't Know"

0 upvotes
Total comments: 220
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