First Impressions: Using the Nikon V1

Using the Nikon V1

Since their launch, the Nikon V1 and its little brother the J1 have generated a lot of discussion amongst our readers, not all of it positive. As a photographer as well as camera reviewer, I am intrigued by this new system for many reasons. It took Nikon three weeks to get us a V1 after we got our first glimpse of non-working samples in New York, but as soon as it arrived I grabbed it and started shooting. A full review of the V1 is underway, but considering the amount of interest that the new system generated among our readers, I wanted to share some early impressions with you. This 3-page article is categorized as 'opinion' and ahead of a full review with the associated studio testing and our usual in-depth analysis, it should be read accordingly. 

Despite the comparatively small size of its sensor, the V1 is amongst the bulkiest compact interchangeable lens system cameras that I've used. It is no surprise that the V1 is bigger than the genuinely compact Pentax Q, but what is very obvious when the camera is directly compared to its competition is how much chunkier it feels compared to larger-format competitors like the Olympus E-PL3 / E-PM1 and Sony NEX-C3.

Like these cameras, the V1 is designed to be easy to use, whatever your level of photographic experience. However, whereas its competitors have opted for large sensors and lots of features (including, increasingly, touch-sensitive LCD screens) Nikon has made a concerted effort to keep the V1 as simple as possible, both in terms of ergonomics and (in some respects) specification.  

Guess which of these cameras (L-R: the Sony NEX-C3, Nikon V1 and Olympus E-PM1) has the smallest sensor? The answer of course is the 10MP V1, despite its larger overall dimensions. The 16MP C3 has an APS-C sized sensor and the E-PM1 is based around a 12MP Micro Four Thirds sensor.

The lack of a 'traditional' exposure mode dial and conventional control dials might seem a little strange, but the audience that Nikon is aiming this camera at may not expect to see either, and in general use with the V1 I don't really miss them. One thing I really like about the V1 compared to some of its competitors (like the Olympus PEN-series and the lower-end Sony NEX models) is its excellent built-in EVF. In use, the V1's EVF isn't as nice as the ultra high-resolution unit in the latest Sony NEX-7 and SLT-A65/77 but it isn't too far behind and with a resolution of 1.44 million dots it is pleasantly crisp and detailed.

If you want to take manual control over exposure you’ll have to select one of the PASM modes from within the main shooting menu, at which point exposure settings are changed using the tiny ‘zoom’ jog switch on the camera’s rear. Again, it took a little time for me to get used to it, but after a short while it became second nature. After I'd stopped trying to zoom the lens by pulling on the zoom toggle, that is...

Less effective is the V1’s manual focus mode, which uses the rear control dial to rack focussing back and forth. To make it easier to see what's in focus and what's not - at least in theory - the zoom switch on the V1's rear acts as a focus area magnification toggle. The trouble is that the screen image gets lower and lower in resolution as you zoom in, making it very hard to focus accurately. To be honest, after trying repeatedly to use manual focus, and failing to reliably get sharp results, I think this is more of a token gesture than a serious feature. 

The long thin control at the top right of this view is a 'zoom' toggle that acts as a magnification control in playback mode and an exposure value shifter in PASM shooting.  The 'F' button to the left of the zoom toggle isn't customizable. In still image shooting it brings up a menu which allows you to switch between mechanical and electronic shutter.

The mode dial beneath is is where you select from Motion Snapshot, Smart Photo Selector, Still Image and Movie modes. Very simple, but easy to rotate by accident. 

The V1 does have a control dial, but during shooting its only purpose is to control shutter speed if you're shooting in manual exposure mode or adjust focus in manual focus mode. 

The V1's design doesn't really encourage much manual control over shooting settings, but that's not a bad thing, per se, and perfectly in keeping with Nikon's intentions for this model. Manual exposure control is there if you want it, and the V1 handles very nicely in aperture and shutter priority modes if you're that way inclined, but there's no danger of a beginner being swamped with confusing control and customization options. 

One of the V1's most interesting functions is Smart Photo Selector, which sits above the green 'still image' icon on the exposure mode dial. In this mode, the V1 shoots twenty images at 30fps in electronic shutter mode, then analyses them and saves four or five (max 5) of what it considers to be the 'best'. If your subject is blurred, out of frame or blinking, that frame won't make the cut. The process takes just over two seconds, and works really well. This isn't the sort of mode that I tend to reach for very often, but I'm very impressed by how well it works in the V1, and - crucially - how efficient it is. It only takes a couple of seconds from the time the shutter is released to the selected images being saved to the memory card. 

Although there is plenty more shooting and testing to with the V1 before we publish our definitive 'take' on the camera, a couple of things have annoyed me during my initial shooting. Firstly, the exposure mode dial on the V1's rear, which rotates far too freely.

The J1 has this problem as well - in my shooting I've lost count of the number of times I've accidentally rotated the dial when shifting my grip on the camera, and ended up in one of the other exposure modes. This is especially annoying when you end up in movie mode, because it's easy not to realise what has happened. In movie mode you see, pressing the shutter release button captures an image, but at reduced resolution (8MP) and only in the 16:9 aspect ratio. If you slip into this mode by accident and you're not paying attention you could end up going home with quite a few images in the 'letterbox' format. 

Secondly, with its kit zoom and 10mm pancake lens options the V1 powers up quickly in roughly 1 second, and only takes a fraction of a second longer to power down. When the camera goes to sleep though, it takes almost two seconds to 'wake up' before you can take a photograph, and a long half press of the shutter button is required to rouse it. Shot to shot time in single frame advance mode isn't great either at around two seconds on average, including AF re-aquisition. This isn't bad performance by the standards of a high-end compact, but it isn't great compared to some of the V1's mirrorless interchangeable lens competitors. 


Turn to page 2 for first impressions of image quality and the V1's AF tracking performance

311
I own it
35
I want it
36
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 131
12
vsagnot
By vsagnot (Apr 19, 2012)

In Easter, I used my Nikon V1 to realize an entire reportage about "Vattienti" Procession, in south Italy.
Lens is 10-30mm, post production with Capture NX2, I invite you to see:
http://www.mediaforme.net/?p=4666
Vincenzo

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Marco Italy
By Marco Italy (3 months ago)

Ciao Vincenzo,
Ho visto le tue foto del reportage "Vattienti" e ti faccio i miei complimenti.
vorrei porti una domanda riguardo la nikon V1. Io sono appassionato di foto di reportage e quindi cerco una macchina veloce e discreta, in più per uso ludico mi piace fare foto ai miei figli, durante i viaggi e qualche filmino. Visto il calo di prezzo sarei tentato di comprare la nikon V1, con il 10-30mm inizialmente per poi prendere il 30-110mm e il 18,5mm. In tal caso venderei la ricoh gr iv e la olympus e620 per tenere una sola macchina fotografica da usare in ogni occasione. Pensi sia una buona scelta o considerando la concorrenza sony rx100II fuji x20 o la prossima x30 dovrei pensare ad altro? Grazie ciao.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 13, 2012)

Like all cameras, the V1 has a lot going for it, and some things to hate ;-)!

The worst thing is the little thumb wheel on the rear, which allows you to choose video, stills, five-in-a-row, or video-postcard (a short video, ended by a still - weird). Many have taped over the wheel, to avoid accidental movement (you're bound to do it when you least expect it). I've have made a taped-on flap, which works most of the time, and still allow me to access the wheel, should I need to. Better would be to file off half the wheel (as only half is used for anything), but I haven't dared to do that yet. Maybe one day ...

Except its nasty habit of choosing just too slow shutter speeds, when using long lenses, and/or its sometimes insane ISO choices, it has impressed me a lot.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 13, 2012)

Superb for macros, delightful for normal indoor, and outdoor work, but not the best in low light, as you then have to use a totally automatic mode, with not a chance to influence the results (A Sony NEX-5N is insanely much better in low light!).

The power zoom 10-100 has not fared well with the lens reviewers, as its sharpness is a far cry from the 10-30 & the 30-110.

As long as the light is OK, most cheap Nikon lenses works very well, as these usually are very sharp in the middle, if nowhere else. The only slight complication is that you need to buy the G-versions of the lenses, as the V1 has no focusing motor built-in.

The camera is about the size of most serious compacts, but weighs a bit more, giving a very rugged, and serious, feel to it. The three 'normal' lenses, stacked on top of each other, is about the size of the Nikon 55-200/4-5.6G with adapter, a 27.2-544 mm kit weighing aprox. 2.5 kilograms!

My normal kit now is the V1 plus my NEX, thus covering all bases ;-)!

0 upvotes
Lights
By Lights (Dec 10, 2011)

The native lenses look a 'little' big.
From what I've read the cameras seem capable in many regards.

0 upvotes
swcng2001
By swcng2001 (Nov 26, 2011)

What about startup time and shutter release time lag?

1 upvote
AnHund
By AnHund (Nov 13, 2011)

Haven't had the slightest problem with the mode dial on my J1. The dial sits just perfectly and does not change selection when shooting.

0 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (Nov 24, 2011)

Yep, with this dial there is no difference what mode you are shooting in after all :)
Apart from the ridiculous movie mode, apparantly there is a dedicated video button, but you can't just hit it and record video, you first have to switch to video mode on the dial first, LOL

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Nov 3, 2011)

I would appreciate something more akin to a Leica M9 with AF please.

When I am travelling I hate lugging a bag full of D3s kit - it weighs a tonne, is conspicuous and generally a PITA.

Yet I am not prepared to do without high IQ and AF performance, both things that are missing from the vast majority of alternative small form options.

0 upvotes
stroboscopic
By stroboscopic (Nov 30, 2011)

But... a Leica M9 with AF is like a Porsche with a chauffeur :)

1 upvote
Kirk Tuck
By Kirk Tuck (Oct 30, 2011)

My name is Kirk and I just bought a V1 kit and the 30-110 zoom. I've shot with it for several hours this afternoon and find it to be an intriguing and capable camera. I'm going to use it to shoot a swim meet tomorrow and also take some studio portraits. I'll have my own review in short order. The market is changing. The only reason to slag this camera is fear of change. It's good. It might not be for you if you are stuck in 2005 but for 2011 it's pretty damn cool. Show me another small camera that does 400 fps slo mo. And much, much more.

8 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Nov 1, 2011)

Right. If the camera had a swivel screen I'd have bought one yesterday. Now, I have to think, because I want that swivel screen. But otherwise it is a nice camera, except for that stupid flash shoe. I hate non-standard flash solutions and the special port could have been solved a bit differently. I also wish the camera had a pop-up flash, but you can't have it all. It's an ugly design but a nice camera.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Charlie Jin
By Charlie Jin (Nov 16, 2011)

Kirk, why don't you use normal DSLR for your purpose ? If the portability is your concern, Nikon V1 is not portable, because of those stupid huge lens. While you can say that normal DSLR belongs to the era of 2005, this Nikon V1 belongs to the age of stupidity and idiocyncracy.

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Nov 23, 2011)

Charlie, I have the Oly P3 and the NEX 5N. The V1 kit lens is smaller that those two cameras' kit lenses. And the V1 can focus track really well. Neither the Oly or Sony comes close. This V1 has a place. I like it better than the other two, overall.

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (Nov 24, 2011)

@Kirk:
"My name is Kirk and I just bought a V1 kit and the 30-110 zoom."

We feel for you, buddy. It even happens to the best of us sometimes. At the end of the day there is always ebay to get rid of it, if you missed the 14 day period that is.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
Alvis II
By Alvis II (Oct 26, 2011)

Part II - Perspective/DoF

I invite everyone to visit this web site

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm

It also contains a useful calculator. As said elsewhere DoF depends mostly on the focal length and aperture (among other things and definitions).

To cut a long story short the calculator gives the equivalent combinations of focal length and aperture for a specific sensor format as required to achieve the same perspective AND DoF in a 35 mm system. The CX format can be extrapolated easily. People can do their sums.

I personally see no way any current mirrorless can replace a DSLR system. Hence I prefer those systems that complement it best, mostly for landscapes, difficult viewing angles and macro and I prefer u4/3 to a DX mirrorless. This new Nikon is also fast with a good viewfinder. Early days yet but would a small 200/2.8 (similar to 550/6.3) with a lot of light gathering abilities be that bad to have for a day out at a F1 Gran Prix?

2 upvotes
frosti7
By frosti7 (Nov 5, 2011)

Why a panasonic G3 cant replace a DSLR?

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 5, 2011)

"mostly for landscapes" - so I would assume you would put a premium on a deep DoF, something which is easier to achieve with a smaller sensor, other things being equal.

Reading these threads you would think that hyperfocal techniques and images pin sharp from front to back were heresy, and anyone caught actively working towards a greater DoF should be shot (and not with a camera).

Obviously all those great landscape photographers got it wrong!

0 upvotes
Alvis II
By Alvis II (Dec 9, 2011)

Dear wetsleet,

first of all, why not using a little more old style education for the pleasure of discussing matters. Shooting people is a big to do you know.
Secondly I am talking about complementing tools. Small sensor cameras give you a lot of freedom. 5x4 landscape master Ansel Adams described his 35mm camera as “an extension of the eye as used freely in the hand". And do you think Galen Rowell shot his work with a large format as he was climbing mountains?

Have a look here: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/shooting-professional-looking-landscapes-with-compact-cameras-16293

But most of all enjoy taking pictures.

0 upvotes
Alvis II
By Alvis II (Oct 26, 2011)

I feel that this sensor issue must be put in perspective. It is a little technical so I deal with it in two posts. Noise first.

The photocurrent (signal) can be assumed proportional to the pixel area.
There are two kind of noises: the shot noise (inherent of light) and electronics noise. The latter dominates in low light. The former grows with the signal and dominates in bright light. Electronics S/N is proportional to the signal whilst the shot noise grows with its square root.

A few sums for a 10 Mpx CX vs a 16Mp DX sensor show 100% degradation at (very) high ISO (low light) and 40% degradation at high ISO (bright light) or about 1 ISO stop at high ISO and 0.5 ISO stop at low ISO.

Performance though depends greatly on digital processing and actual chip implementation. Notice that the V1 has on chip ADC conversion that greatly reduce electronics noise.

Given all this I am not worried about noise in real life nor surprised by web test shots and comments of people.

1 upvote
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 13, 2012)

Indeed, in low light the V1 is not the best of cameras (as comparison, the NEX-5N is eons better), but under all other situation it amazes me, again and again.

So sunsets, fog, and night shots, are better done with a bigger sensor, but as long as the light is OK, it takes stunning shots!

Bit like the XZ-1, with its excellent lens and superb shots on sunny days, but far from the best in low light.

0 upvotes
PhotoPhoolish
By PhotoPhoolish (Oct 25, 2011)

In my opinion, this is just another poor attempt at a mirror-less design. The only companies to have got it right are Sony and Samsung due to their use of APS-C sized sensors. To use anything smaller, with 4/3 being a slight exception, is a waste. The cameras with smaller sensors are just glorified point and shoots with interchangeable lenses.

Why pay $1,000 for a camera and basic zoon lens when a G12, S100 or P7100 can give you equal quality shots and a larger zoom range for half as much money?

"There's a sucker born every minute." ~ P.T. Barnum

Also, what is the biggest problem with a P & S? I would say indoor shots under poor light with those built-in flashes, and not tracking of high speed objects. This is one clear reason why a larger sensor with better high ISO capabilities is a must in this type of design.

I can't believe it took Nikon 4 years to design this. Poor R & D for sure.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 5, 2011)

"There's a sucker born every minute." And you are one of them. Go back to the dawn of "full frame" (35mm film) photography. Only they didn't call it "full frame" back then. They derided it as a "miniature" format, real photographers only used proper 6x4 format. Everything you read about how the world will stop turning if you use anything smaller than [insert your own hobby-horse size here] has been written before, only it was written about the format you now bow down before.

6 upvotes
Peter Sanders
By Peter Sanders (Nov 18, 2011)

And deride 35 mm they did 60 years ago when I bought
my first one, you are correct, it was called a miniature
camera. But, could put it in ones pocket and take it anywhere.
It was ready for any photo opportunity and loaded with HP3
or TRI X, could cope with any light conditions.
Really enjoyed your post wetsleet.
nokton.

0 upvotes
jm07
By jm07 (Nov 30, 2011)

I am one of the "suckers that bought the V1. I normally shoot with a D300, a D7000 and a G12 depending upon what I am doing. After a couple of days of shooting the V1 and the G12, I sold my G12 and kept the V1. I shoot in raw and process in CS-5 so I don't need things perfect right out of the camera just the raw material to make a great quality of an image.

I am happy with the high quality in a small package when I want to travel light. Too many negative people that need to actually try the camera, not armchair it.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
snackwells
By snackwells (Oct 25, 2011)

In your AF tracking example, I see you comment on the contribution from the very large DOF...I venture to say that most of the so-called performance can be attributed to the large DOF! Nice try, Nikon.

3 upvotes
Ponxo
By Ponxo (Oct 25, 2011)

Nikon must put this sensor and features in a P7100 body, call it P8000 And have an awesome compact camera. They will do it in 3 year, when they finish milking this cameras. Hope isn't late.

0 upvotes
jeans
By jeans (Jan 28, 2012)

That's what Canon G1X is :-)

0 upvotes
Kim Seng
By Kim Seng (Apr 5, 2012)

Canon G1X cannot change lens, cannot attach to a FT1 adapter with long lens to take birds, You may have to wait for Canon to come out one like V1. Wait.

0 upvotes
boliston
By boliston (Oct 24, 2011)

I've just had a look at a V1 at my local camera shop and I'm pretty impressed with what I saw - I thought the LCD was very clear & detailed as well as the colour EVF as well.

I use a D700 with a 28mm prime lens as my "main" camera but the V1 with 10mm pancake would make a nice "second" camera for times when I don't feel like carrying the D700.

Also it uses the "NEF" file format so it will work fine with my existing ViewNX2/CaptureNX2 workflow.

I'd be interested in knowing how well Program AE mode works as I have tried this mode on a friend's Lumix GF2 and it fails to adjust the aperture properly (ie the mode is "broken").

Finally I'd want to be able to manually set the focus distance (eg 1m/2.5m/5m etc) and would be interested if the V1 allows this as I have never much liked using auto focus.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 13, 2012)

Setting distance manually is perfectly OK, as long as you use your normal lenses (with the TF1 adapter)!

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Oct 24, 2011)

The best thing that Nikon could do now is 3 things:

1. Release ASAP the next models V1n and J1n

2. They would have 4/3 sensors and smaller lenses.

3. Reduce the price by half.

If Nikon could swallow their humble pie and crawl 500 yards through the pipelines of Shawshank, then it will be to their redemption.

6 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 5, 2011)

bigger sensors, smaller lenses, and all for less money. You don't want much for less money then, just the impossible.

5 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Nov 13, 2011)

This seems to be a feature of "enthusiast" whining, Nikon has a big problem in that it's core market is people that want the laws of physics to be flexible and provide them with a camera that has 24mp a 1.4 lens and still fits in the palm of the hand.

The 1 cameras are aimed at a different market and even though I'm a Nikon DSLR man to my bones I will get one of these 1s for when I'm out cycling or on my way to work which is when I see a lot of good picks but because I don't have SLR and tripod on me I miss them.

Any camera is better than the one you haven't got with you and these 1s do a fine job of taking good quality pics very quickly. Kudos to Nikon for trying something different.

PS I prefer the J having tried both as it's easier to use and has less stuff in the way, a true P&S

0 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (Nov 24, 2011)

@Hugo808:
No it seems to be a feature of Nikon fanboys to play down all disadvantages of the V1/J1 and avoid comparison with the products of competitors. It's a fact that Nikon managed to fit a smaller sensor in a bulkier body and still NOT take advantage of the CX size and make more compact or faster lenses! That's shockingly uncompetitive and only people who can't see any further than Nikon can praise this camera.

Whant a 24mp camera with 1.4 lens WITHOUT bending he laws of physics - look at a NEX 7 & Voidtlander 35/1.4. If you are in such need of AF just get a P&S camera - all J1/V1 advantages have been available in these for years.

3 upvotes
arhmatic
By arhmatic (Oct 24, 2011)

Why is everyone making Continuous Shooting and AF Tracking a HUGE feature?
Trying to cover up all other shortcomings?

I can't ever remember using Continuous Shooting... EVER - and I am a Nikon SLR AND P&S user for just too many years... I'd be VERY curious to see a poll on how many of us are REALLY using that, at least once a month.

4 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Oct 24, 2011)

Most consumers just need a camera that can take a photo of a small child before he or she runs off. They don't generally need to take photos of a speeding motorcycle coming right at them, shooting at 10fps. The funny thing is that photographers who would be most interested in continuous high speed shooting and tracking would be the least interested in this system with such a tiny sensor. They'd much rather stick with their DSLRs.

5 upvotes
jonikon
By jonikon (Oct 24, 2011)

Anyone who has shot spots knows continuous fast and accurate AF tracking is essential for sharp images of the subject. Only one of the current crop of mirror-less cameras is up to the task, and that is the Nikon V1.

3 upvotes
arhmatic
By arhmatic (Oct 25, 2011)

I can guess who they were targeting, but demographics are TINY. Besides, this is what SLRs are for. Fail, no matter how you look at it.

0 upvotes
Goodmeme
By Goodmeme (Oct 25, 2011)

@ jonikon, can you pls clarify what shooting 'spots' means? I photograph people in studio and out and have never heard of 'spots' before. I've shot with 5D, 1DMk2, 24-70 etc. I value fast autofocus, but never use continuous.

I think I would only use it for birds in flight or motorcycle racing (neither of which interest me), but in those situations, I would almost certainly use a different camera altogether.

0 upvotes
Thomas Toolan
By Thomas Toolan (Oct 28, 2011)

I think he meant sports not spots...

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Oct 24, 2011)

All the talk about depth of field and shooting speed is fine, but I looked at the photo of the bricks (at ISO 100) and things are either blurry, lacking detail or both. Granted, this is at 100% but this is a taken from the center of the image, on a sunny day at the lowest ISO. RAW seems to bring it up to more or less acceptible but by no stretch is this image quality anything great. And wasn't the idea to keep everything simple, meaning no need for RAW processing?

3 upvotes
CacoCardoso
By CacoCardoso (Oct 24, 2011)

Congrats for your "to the point" comments Torn and Katchurian.
I'm one of those attracted by the word Nikon, but the limited DOF control, the large pack with such a small sensor and the Leica-Like price altogether have damaged this camera's appeal to advanced photographers.

0 upvotes
TORN
By TORN (Oct 24, 2011)

The bottom line to me is, that from a depth of field perspective you will have to use the fixed focal lens to not fall behind compacts like a S100 or LX-5. At the actual level of image quality modern cameras deliver in general, I care more about how much freedom I have when composing images and there the new Nikons fall short at least in my book.

For the same reason I avoided mFT so far but as of end 2011 you can combine a mFT sensor with 12mm 2.0, 20mm 1.7 and 45mm 1.8 which results in at least two more aperture steps of composing power compared to the Nikons with the available fixed focal lens. Would be great if Panasonic or Olympus would upgrade one of their small flat bodies with built in EVF...

So if using the aperture for creativity is your thing then the Nikon is not for you. In the end images from those Nikons will look exactly like the compositions from your compact, probably with better technical quality but nevertheless not better appeal.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Thomas Kachadurian
By Thomas Kachadurian (Oct 24, 2011)

Only someone attracted by the word Nikon will even give this thing a second look. Too, too expensive for "soccer moms" even if they can afford it. not enough for serious photographer. Too big.

What were they thinking?

2 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 13, 2012)

Never been that impressed by the consumer grade Nikon DSLRs, nor the compacts. Can't afford the pro-style ones.

I am very much a serious photographer, but can't afford a Leica, or a D1 X, thus the V1 became the obvious answer to my needs, as a light kit for times when I can't bring a trunk full of camera gear with me.

For landscape, and low-light shots, I use my NEX-5N with the Zeiss 1.8/24, for the rest the V1 rules supreme, not least macro shots of insects, longer tele shots of birds, and people. The lens I use least is the 10, and I don't own the 10-100 motor zoom (not that sharp), plus the TF1, so I can use any normal Nikon G lens I choose (as I don't have a Nikon DSLR I had to buy a few -
all very decently priced, new and used. The Nikon 55-200/4-5.6G is a perfect complement to the '1' lenses, as it almost doubled the zoom range of my V1 kit for a very small cost (the lens is utterly sharp in the center, and that's the area the V1 uses!

I think Nikon been very wise!

0 upvotes
jonikon
By jonikon (Oct 24, 2011)

After test driving both the Sony NEX and Nikon V1, I feel that Nikon has the better camera for moving subject photography. The Sony NEX has better high ISO IQ, but the Nikon V1 has much faster and more accurate tracking focusing, and that is even more important than high ISO IQ in any camera. (How many times have you heard someone with a pocket camera complain they missed the shot because the camera was too slow?) The focusing speed and accuracy of the V1 is surprisingly fast, and puts the Sony NEX cameras pocket camera focusing system to shame. Also the Nikon lenses are much better optically and more compact than the over-sized, overprices and optically poor Sony NEX lenses (check the reviews!). I think Nikon has a winner with their new Nikon 1 system. The powered zoom lenses (that other systems lack), and more powerful telephoto power of the smaller sensor size will be Nikon's advantage, and make the Nikon 1 system the darling of soccer moms everywhere!

Best regards,
Jon

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Oct 24, 2011)

Oversized and overpriced, did you just say that after mentioning the V1 or NEX?
Heh.

7 upvotes
rinkos
By rinkos (Oct 24, 2011)

thats really funny since these smallest cameras were not made for sport tracking nor do any of them have the lens for that ...so searching through to a camera which does that is funny ..
more over since its low iso rating the V1 J1 cant do a proper sport to print it big...something like football night is quite simply beyond any A4 and above big prints from them.

so yea..the Nex's may use contrast detection which is slower than the SLR's full size phase detection ..yet the Nex's and the V1 J1 nor the 4/3 were ever made to be "sport cams"

and as for "poor sony lenses" i suggest u go look at the real numbers at photozone.de ..u might be surprised.

in all honestly i highly doubt u even test drived a nex...much less the nex nex5N to be talking like that..why dont u educate ur self and go into the Nex forums and see what is really true..

and Troj..well put :)

4 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Oct 24, 2011)

Any advantages in the AF department that the V1 might have won't exist forever. Developments and advancements in mirrorless AF performance will continue to progress throughout the industry, but the Nikon 1 system will always be stuck with that tiny sensor. Besides, the NEX system is hardly a slouch in the AF department. It's certainly fast enough for most consumer users. And I hardly think that any "soccer moms" will be able to tell much of any difference in optical quality between NEX lenses vs CX lenses. I think the only market for these cameras are really diehard fanatical Nikonian soccer moms who don't mind paying so much for such a small sensor...probably not a big enough market to make these cameras "a winner" in the mirrorless battlefield.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (Nov 13, 2011)

Sorry but the J1/V1 outperforms the NEX-7 in high ISO performance, but maybe it is a NEX-5?

Otherwise I agree with all your comments.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 13, 2012)

Agree with Jon in all details - exactly my sentiments! The only NEX lens that impresses me is E18-200. It sure is a nice lens, but both expensive and bulky! The Zeiss 1.8/24 is also nice, but also as expensive.

0 upvotes
Vadimka
By Vadimka (Oct 24, 2011)

Good preview and nice video Dick.

Looking at this camera makes me think that it was carefully and purposely design to avoid cannibalizing Nikon's dSLR line up at all cost. This is very greedy of Nikon and honestly it does look like an idea that was conceived 4 years ago. I'd think if Nikon was paying attention to the market they'd revisit the whole design and adjust to market demands, but for some reason Nikon decided they will dictate what consumer needs. (probably betting on marketing to pull them out)

They will still sell lots of these cameras, just because they are Nikon, but I believe they will miss a lot more by playing it safe. Sony, Pany and Oly are way ahead of Nikon right now as far as complete system goes. Yes Nikon might have some cool bells and whistles, but those are attainable things and will be only matter of time for NEX and m4/3 to get. (like Elect Shutter to be specific)

2 upvotes
RickBuddy
By RickBuddy (Oct 24, 2011)

I'm most interested in this camera for its video capabilities. I'm continually frustrated by reviews that overlook or simply give lip service to those issues.

So far, I'm not impressed with the DPreview approach.

On a consumer video camera in this price range, I think fast focus is important, and throw in small, interchangeable lenses for under a grand and that's a nice thing. Oh, and it can capture some nice photos, too? Cool.

1" chip is fine for video, and the crop factor works very well compared to an 3/4. A 200mm zoom lens has more reach in video mode than it does on a 3/4.

I think this is Nikon's first serious venture into video. I want to know more about it. V=Video?

Rick

2 upvotes
jonikon
By jonikon (Oct 24, 2011)

I agree with you Rick. The smaller sensor will give a huge advantage to anyone shooting sports from a distance and the motorized zoom lenses are a godsend for video shooters. Can you image shooting with a 500mm APS-C sized lens on a Sony NEX camera? It would be HUGE! Besides looking silly, it would be a nightmare to handle such a lens/camera combination. An equivalent field of view lens on the Nikon 1 system would only be a much smaller and lighter 185mm lens! Nikon was correct in using a smaller than APS-C sensor for a lighter system camera for shooting sports.

2 upvotes
javaone
By javaone (Oct 24, 2011)

If you ever try to take pictures of a 4-10 year old child playing with a point and shoot you would realize this is a big step up. It may be even better than most SLR’s.
My wife thinks her D60 SLR’s are too big and is difficult to focus on a running kid with only 3 focus points. She does not want theoretical image quality but large number of blurry shots.
I go to my 4 year olds soccer game with a D300, 80-200 afs/f2.8, mono pod and I just stick out.

To say the price is too high seems to miss the value of a well-focused action shot.

What cheaper camera would have a better success rate in casual photos of a kid’s soccer? Kids playing at a birthday party?

2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Oct 24, 2011)

Other mirrorless camera systems are also doing well in the AF department. My brother-in-law recently shot his kid's (my nephew's) birthday party with his new NEX C-3. He loved its AF performance, even with all those kids running around. And it has a sensor *much* larger than the Nikon 1 cameras. As for your comment about your wife's DSLR, why the heck are you using the AF performance of a nearly 10-year-old DSLR with only 3 AF points (the D60) as supporting evidence that the Nikon 1 system's AF is "a big step" for taking pictures of kids playing!?!?! As evidenced by my brother-in-law's NEX C-3 experience, the Nikon 1 system isn't the only mirorless camera system that can handle shooting kids playing! LOL

2 upvotes
jonikon
By jonikon (Oct 24, 2011)

Ignore the naysayers that have not actually had a hands on test drive the Nikon V1 like I did. Have your wife try it out and I predict she will LOVE it for her intended use!

2 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (Nov 24, 2011)

A Nikon 170 GBP P&S camera will handle the situation even better than the overprised V/J 1. Nikon S8200 or S9100 being much smaller and compact with zooms in the range of 10x or 18x will get you the same quality. After all V/J 1 are P&S cameras with flat looking images, just overpriced.

1 upvote
IeraseU
By IeraseU (Oct 24, 2011)

It's undoubtedly a nice camera, but price point is everything. Either you sell it to enthusiasts who demand certain mainual controls and features, or to the mainstream soccer mom segment that doesn't want to spend too much on a camera.

Nikon is not Apple. You just can't create a wave of excitement for a $650 or $900 camera among casual shooters given the current economic climate.

1 upvote
Dolly
By Dolly (Nov 3, 2011)

I wonder are these the same soccer mums/moms that drive large expensive SUV's instead of cheap chinese cars? These are the people who will get a shot of their kid with motion snapshot or smart photo selector and be amazed, they will justify the cost based on the photo and they will tell all of their friends as well. The y also will not know or care about sensor size. Probably have no idea what dpreview is and will probably get the leather cases to match. Nikon in the mean time will be busy at creating your new amazing pro DSLRs and also keeping the compact camera user happy.
They are all markets important to Nikon and other camera manufacturers. Except Olympus/Panasonic who don't have a DSLR family.

If you have played with the Nikon 1 you have to be extremely excited about the future of your next DSLR and also very pleasantly surprised at the speed and performance of the Nikon 1. I know I am.

0 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (Nov 24, 2011)

They would just grab the sexiest looking P&S - and that's not the V1 or J1. Do you think the 'soccer moms' will be willing to mess with changing lenses, continuous shooting or raw files? No chance.

2 upvotes
astwood1285
By astwood1285 (Oct 23, 2011)

Reading the posts below you'd think the apocalypse had arrived on time and it's name was V1. I played with one and it is small, heavy for it's size and seemingly well made. Indoors in a shop (store) the AF was fast on the 10 - 30mm kit lens. It's a bit pricey but I suspect that price will come down. All Nikon needs is to hurry up with the GPS unit and make a real wide angle. 5 or 6mm f/2 anyone?
And yes, I did buy one.

1 upvote
Color Blotch
By Color Blotch (Oct 23, 2011)

Again and again Nikon 1 looks like a good showing of technological potential wrecked by a marketing decision. Using a smaller sensor doesn't reduce size, doesn't reduce cost, and it doesn't really help with anything that is good with these cameras as all the remarkable results that Nikon managed to get with them could just as well be achieved with sensor of bigger size. It's a kind of loss that gives you no gains in return, something that is pretty difficult to overcome when fighting for customers on increasingly crowded and competitive market.

1 upvote
Dolly
By Dolly (Oct 24, 2011)

The smaller sensor size could just be the best selling feature for a lot of people. Think of the size of a 300mm equivalent lens on a Sony NEX or m4/3rds. Then compare that to the kit lens on of the V1/J1. Then think 300mm and the speed of this camera and you have a pretty amazing offering.

2 upvotes
Color Blotch
By Color Blotch (Oct 24, 2011)

The same argument was used before as justification for Four-Thirds standard as compared to APS-C. No, it didn't work.

0 upvotes
WT21
By WT21 (Oct 23, 2011)

The fact that the body is not smaller still, is not a bad thing. Perhaps Nikon can reverse the trend to spy-sized mini cameras. I find the NEX C3 too small for me. Maybe if these cameras had tiny, retracting lenses, but not with the larger lenses, stopping it from fitting into a pocket anyway.

1 upvote
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Oct 23, 2011)

yep a collapsing lens like the 14-42 x by panny..

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Oct 24, 2011)

The NEX C3 is "too small" for you, but the V1 and J1 aren't? That makes no sense. The C3 body is just as wide as the Nikon 1 cameras, but it's just not as tall. And the C3 has a much more substantial grip than either the V1 or the J1, which have no molded grips at all!

0 upvotes
Boris F
By Boris F (Oct 23, 2011)

Very nice DP's comarison V1 to G3:
looks like the lens initialy was designed for m43.

0 upvotes
steveTQP
By steveTQP (Oct 25, 2011)

As a Nikon admirer, I wish them luck with this system. As for myself, I am of the opinion that the target "soccer mom" buyer is not going to want to bother with either RAW post-processing or even changing lenses too often. Image Quality may be fine for them, IF they can capture the shot they want. Personally, I would opt for Image Quality over portability, but that's why I use an APS-C DSLR over even m4/3. Best of luck to Nikon though!

0 upvotes
gmanphoto1980
By gmanphoto1980 (Oct 23, 2011)

IMHO, Sony has the overwhelming edge in this class of camera systems. The NEX series is sublime. I love Nikon, but they missed the mark here with this lovely looking machine that possesses less than desired specs. Regards, G

0 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (Oct 24, 2011)

NEX lacks good competitively priced glass. Without it, it's half a camera. The light-sapping expensive bulky Alpha adapter is no substitute.

1 upvote
Tom10
By Tom10 (Oct 23, 2011)

I have such mixed feelings on the whole EVIL idea. I like that without the moving mirror, and no pentaprism, the whole camera can be made quite small, even "pocketable" with a pancake lens. The larger sensor allows better IQ and higher usable ISO levels.
But reality tells you differently. the smaller you make it, the ergonomics go to hell. The 10-100mm zoom lens attached to the camera, on page three, is really stricking. How does this thing balance on the camera? Will you hands start to cramp as you try to contrort them around the body and lens? I look forward to picking one up and seeing it for myself.
So I wish Nikon luck and am curious what Canon has in store.

-Also, is it me, or are these new Nikons ugly as sin?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Oct 23, 2011)

Hmm, a combination of an average P&S image quality with inconvenience of interchangeable lens and a lack of manual controls... doesn't it feel like a spit into face of Nikon customers?

5 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (Nov 13, 2011)

Can't be compared to average P&S. IQ is a lot better and it even outperforms the NEX-7 in high ISO capability.

0 upvotes
AnselWannaBe
By AnselWannaBe (Oct 23, 2011)

Disappointed with Nikon as I have been a faithful for 40 years and am still seeking a small, fast P&S. Alas, it looks like the new iPhone 4S, while not really a camera but a phone with a camera, is looking better than this camera. OK, Nikon users, what is your favorite "take anywhere" camera from any brand that can capture the moment fast... with thumb controls?

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Oct 23, 2011)

well, it would be this, if only it were packaged as a P&S with a few manual controls. But since it won't fit in my pocket, then I need a camera bag. And what's with the interchangeable lenses - so they really do want me to take a camera bag, don't they! Great - I've already got a camera bag. Hey, it's got a DSLR in it already.

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
svejk
By svejk (Oct 23, 2011)

I was in the same boat as AnselWannaBe. Get a Canon S90/95/100 like I did. Put tape over Canon label. Take nice pics. Sigh.

1 upvote
gmanphoto1980
By gmanphoto1980 (Oct 23, 2011)

Agreed. I purchased the Canon S95..took it on my honeymoon - along with my iPhone 4...both served me very well...

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 23, 2011)

My ideal small camera would have excellent low light performance and excellent focus tracking. So Nikon got it half right, and Sony got it half right. No m4/3, compact or P&S excels at either.
Some people want a pocket camera, but I'm not one of those. So I have two cameras to choose from, a 5N or a V1. I already have a 5n, and I can testify that it doesn't have a very good focus system but has a fantastic sensor. Don't know about the V1, but everything I read says it is a focusing demon.

0 upvotes
Peter Evans
By Peter Evans (Oct 24, 2011)

>>But since it won't fit in my pocket, then I need a camera bag. And what's with the interchangeable lenses - so they really do want me to take a camera bag, don't they! Great - I've already got a camera bag. Hey, it's got a DSLR in it already.<<

My sentiments entirely!

What is of far more interest to me is when we're going to see a review of the Fuji X10. Now, at first glance, that does seem like a proper 'take with you anywhere anytime' camera for photographers. OK, so it won't fit in my jeans' pocket, but it will fit in a jacket pocket or in my 'man-bag' - which is pretty much obligatoire for men here in France ;-)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
pgphoto_ca
By pgphoto_ca (Oct 23, 2011)

When we read between the lines....it's not great !!!

As a semi-pro Nikon customer....The competitors are very happy and you should do better survey before defining a camera...

0 upvotes
CollBaxter
By CollBaxter (Oct 23, 2011)

Thanks for the views.

If the AF , CAF and sensor lives up to Nikons claims this could be a nice add on for a wild life shooter. Add a 500mm which would be 1350mm FF lens with the adaptor and Hmmmmm.. not to shabby. Yea I know about cropping but you would need an enormous sensor to get the same resolution FF , and you cut off the junky (soft) sides of FF lenses and use the center sweet spot.

My thoughts are that Nikon will release a unit some time with a grip ( DSLR shape ) and that will really interesting in the wildlife sector. They did not want to scare the current DSLR users YET.

Morriorles is comming so we will have to embrace it sometime. I am a DSLR user periond I like slapping mirrors. But the times are changing.

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Oct 23, 2011)

"thanks to the generous depth of field afforded by the 1-system's small sensor"

It really is too bad that even DPR perpetuates the myth that sensor size determines depth of field, when the truth is that it is determined by the focal length of the lens (for a given aperture).

True, the sensor size will in large measure determine the the focal length used, but nevertheless it remains true that it is the focal length (for a given aperture) and not the sensor size which determines DoF.

"how much depth-of-field there is, even 'wide open' on the 10-30mm and 10-100mm zooms. This is no surprise at all, and a natural consequence of the 1 system being built around such a comparatively small sensor."

Again, No! It is a natural consequence of using a 10mm lens.

It is similar to the error of equating perspective with focal length, rather than with subject to camera distance.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 23, 2011)

I was trying to express it in as easily digestible a way as possible. Small sensor = very short focal lengths for the same 'equivalent' FOV, which = big DOF. This is an opinion piece, not a review, I was simply trying to reach for terms that would be readily understood.

5 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Oct 23, 2011)

I guess I was nit-picking :)

Hurry up and get the full review out already, and take some time (!) to get the camera out and about to evaluate its potential in typical "grab shot of the fleeting moment" family use.

0 upvotes
Andrei Todea
By Andrei Todea (Oct 23, 2011)

I think DPReview know very well the theory and what they said was extremely clear and true. The only thing that some people may not know is what is 'large' and 'small' DoF and if 'generous DoF' (which sounds good) is what they actually want. I guess most amateurs believe that a photo is 'professional' if it has a small DoF (but they don't know how to say that) and they are hoping to get that small DoF which they saw from their friends with big DSLRs.
Maybe it would be a good idea to explain these strange things like DoF, 'fast' lenses, etc. They used to have a section for that.

@Barney Britton, DPReview
The 'learn' links don't work (here is an example):
http://www.dpreview.com/learn/key=depth_of_field
You can reach this link from this page:
http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glossary/Exposure/Aperture_01.htm

Later edit: I hope there are no more typos :)

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 23, 2011)

I think DPR was right to use a field relevant explanation about DOF. If you used a 105mm lens on this little camera you would need to back off a long way to get anything but nose hair in a portrait. And once you back off to get more than nose hair, the DOF is right back where you started with a 30mm lens. So even though technically the sensor is not the culprit, in the real world it is.

3 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 25, 2011)

@Andrei - the learn section is due for an overhaul, we're aware that it's not fantastic.

0 upvotes
win39
By win39 (Oct 23, 2011)

Really nice first impression, Mr. Britton. It really answered a lot of questions I had about using the camera. I am even more puzzled about some of Nikon's design decisions, but I hope the camera is a smashing sales success. With professional DSLRs shut down at Sendai from the tsunami and all the rest shut down in Thailand because of the flood, this little Chinese built camera is the only game in town for Nikon for some months to come.

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Oct 23, 2011)

Forget the whole CSC thing with this camera, give me this sensor and AF in something like the X10, with an optical viewfinder (I know it won't be 100% view, who cares, it is better than looking at a washed out screen in the sun)

If I need to take a camera kit bag then I may as well take the SLR. So my 'other' camera needs to fit in my pocket, and doesn't want a second bag full of lenses - it just won't happen.

I really really want something like the X10, and the focus speed advantage on the V1 is a real selling point. But this whole CSC thing, it is just baggage.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (Oct 23, 2011)

I think most consumers would prefer this, but the camera companies want us to buy lenses. I hope when Fuji comes out with their interchangeable system they won't forget to keep building on their succesful x100 and x10.

2 upvotes
migus
By migus (Oct 24, 2011)

i'm still invested in Nikon, yet my choice would also be X10, not V1... whose IL system is too ponderous and expensive for its CX sensor. Except its improved AF (helped by tiny sensor), the V1 seems an overpriced dust-exposed superzoom alternative.

What market is V1: compact (No), IQ (no), 2nd body (NO), superzoom (perhaps), videocam (maybe)...?

0 upvotes
iBuzz
By iBuzz (Oct 23, 2011)

I really don't understand why the reviewer comparing the size of Nikon V1 with cameras without EVF... I think the reviewer need to compare apples with apples and adding the EVF and accessory port into the equation.

2 upvotes
Denis of Whidbey Island
By Denis of Whidbey Island (Oct 23, 2011)

I saw a TV commercial for these cameras, so Nikon is making a push for holiday sales.

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Oct 23, 2011)

It looks like m4/3rds is the sweet spot for mirrorless hybrid stil/video cameras since the sensor size is not too big or too small. The new X series Panasonic lenses like the 14-42mm are much smaller than this Nikon or Sony and there are many other great lenses like the Voigtländer Nokton 25mm f/0.95, Olympus 12mm F2.0 and Noktor 12mm F1.6.
http://vimeo.com/30097165
http://vimeo.com/27365630
http://vimeo.com/25474377

2 upvotes
burnymeister
By burnymeister (Oct 23, 2011)

I agree. m43 is right now the best overall mirror-less system available. Sony NEX is roaring into the picture though! When they get the 50mm f/1.8 and 24mm f/1.8 released I think they are going to be the best option.

1 upvote
migus
By migus (Oct 24, 2011)

Samsung's NX is the dark horse of APS CSCs, despite no brand recognition... NX has good glass, exemplary user interface, reasonable APS sensors (DR: a bit steep roll-off high), very low price... and its under-average JPG at high ISO imposes RAW (large files). However, it competes w/ most dSLRs at 1/2 size and price.

my NX100 ain't prety, but for $250 is light, solid, and takes all my nikkors ($15 adapter)...for smaller sensor i'm looking at X10

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JohnnyWashngo
By JohnnyWashngo (Oct 23, 2011)

Nice preview article - I look forward to the full review.

I struggle to understand the target market for this system though. It does seem, from the ability to shoot a couple dozen shots and let the camera choose the best 4 or 5, that it is aiming for people who want to whip out the camera and grab a great shot quickly. But the interchangeable lenses say otherwise... I dont know many people who would want to shoot fast in that way who would be bothered to consider the lens they are using. Most of those people wouldnt have a clue which lens would be best in any given situation.

It seems like a frankensteins monster of a camera system, designed by committee and appealing to nobody.

1 upvote
mnemiroff
By mnemiroff (Oct 24, 2011)

These cameras have been designed for fast AF and fast fps, specifically, soccer moms shooting their kids on the field. However, at these prices, if the high ISO performance is mediocre then these "clunky" cameras will not make the grade.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
PerL
By PerL (Oct 23, 2011)

The main complaint ordinary people have against P&S cameras according to Nikons research, is not that the IQ i bad, but is that it is hard to catch a decisive moment.
The speed in AF/fps is the unique selling point of these cameras, and what one should be aware of in comparisions vs the competition.

2 upvotes
DREWnetwork
By DREWnetwork (Oct 23, 2011)

People who want point-and-shoot want to point and shoot. They're not interested in interchangeable lenses, they don't care.

People who want interchangeable lenses are hobbyists at a minimum. This means they want manual controls and actually care about the size of the sensor.

Trying to ram (colored) interchangeable lenses down the throat of point-and-shoot consumers and/or trying to force hobbyists on "AUTO" is yet another blunder from Nikon.

I thank the reviewer for this article and respect an open mind. But, the truth is that Nikon presented a solution to a non-existent market. This new system is irritating to hobbyists/pros and not all that great for point-and-shoot regular folks.

10 upvotes
Tim in upstate NY
By Tim in upstate NY (Oct 23, 2011)

Non-existent market you say? Mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras have been around for more than two years now. And they've been displacing both P&S and entry level DSLR sales in the world marketplace which is exactly why Nikon's solution has now been introduced. Sorry, but you've got it completely wrong when you try to pretend that mirrorless ILC's aren't really happening!

3 upvotes
PG Thomas
By PG Thomas (Oct 23, 2011)

I think Pentax must be laughing, as the Q is getting good press (if you want small and interchangeable lenses). And Fuji with the X10 will lead the 'pro' compact group in 2012. Sony have the best overall product - if you want quality in this group.

I like Nikon, but I agree, it is a missed opportunity, without a strong price differential - who would buy this?.

For the P&S brigade, The new generation iphones will eat into this market anyway...

Pete T

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Oct 23, 2011)

I had high hopes for this camera. But the video clips are underwhelming and the high ISO is too. I'm really not sure what Nikon were thinking at this point. The design says "I compete with an E-PM1 or Nex3 or Q". The price says "I compete with a Nex 7". In either case, I think it's heavily out specified by the competition. I like the idea that I could focus some of my Nikon glass on it. Other than that, it sounds like a bust in every way.

The sensor and interface seem to be weak points. The point and shoot crowd want something like the J1, and that seems to hit the spot there. But who is the V1 targeted at? The V1 seems like a compromise in all the wrong places. I don't predict this being a hit, and I don't see the potential for a next generation if they don't sell.

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Oct 23, 2011)

This camera along with a decent optics dont deliver the performance of APS-C or FF body nor is it small enough like the Coolpix models so that it can be put in a pocket. I am still very confused about this mirrorless passion in the photographic industry and the advantage of it.

0 upvotes
JesperMP
By JesperMP (Oct 23, 2011)

Dang, I could have been interested in a camera like the V1.
As I see it, the J1 is for the "soccer mums", whereas the V1 is for enthusiast looking for an exchangable lens camera small enough to bring along always.

But I see a number of problems.
1. Without a proper grip, the ergonomics suffers, especially with larger lenses.
2. I need to be in control. I want quick access to WB, ISO, Exp.Comp. I dont want to dive into menus.
3. The lenses are too big.
4. There is no bright prime normal lens. Only f2.8.
5. Would have preferred the EVF at the edge.

So all in all, this is not for me.

2 upvotes
Dymo
By Dymo (Oct 23, 2011)

I saw the real cameras in HK, very ugly especially v1.

I even had no intention to pick it up ti use.

0 upvotes
taotoo
By taotoo (Oct 23, 2011)

Excellent first impressions that cut to the chase. Thank you.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 131
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