Interview: Tetsuya Yamamoto of Nikon

Tetsuya Yamamoto, General Manager of Nikon’s Development Headquarters within its Imaging Division. (Image courtesy Nikon Inc.)

At this year’s International CES show in Las Vegas, we spoke to Tetsuya Yamamoto, General Manager of Nikon’s Development Headquarters within its Imaging Division. We discussed the market’s reaction to the 1 J1 and V1, and how the system might evolve in the future.

According to Yamamoto, Nikon has been pleased with the success of the 1 System, especially the J1, in the American market but that even before the system's launch 'we were very confident that there were customers out there who would gravitate towards the V1 and the J1'.

He told us that the sort of people buying the J1 and V1 are those customers that 'want a DSLR but don’t want something big and heavy’. He went on, '1 System customers like the fast AF and the size of the cameras and lenses, and once they’ve used [new features like] Motion Snapshot they really like them'. 

1 System sensor 'capable of 2K / 4K video'

Yamamoto told us that Motion Snapshot, which combines a still image with slow motion video in a single capture is a feature that Nikon is keen to improve in the next generation of 1 System cameras. There’s good news, potentially for videographers too - according to Yamamoto 'the [J1 and V1’s] sensor is capable of 2K (2048×1080px) and 4K (~4000px horizontal resolution) video and in the future we hope to incorporate [these functions]'.

'We are going to develop brighter lenses for better total performance'

Also on the agenda for future 1 System products it appears, are improvements to their innovative 'Hybrid' AF systems, which combine conventional contrast-detection AF with a faster phase-detection system, all using the main 10MP imaging sensor.

The key, according to Yamamoto, is faster lenses. He told us 'we want to develop higher speed AF, and specifically to improve phase-detection AF from the imaging sensor. This depends on lens aperture – if the lens [has a larger aperture] then AF is much faster'. In the future, he told us, 'we are going to develop brighter lenses for better total performance – brighter but still small'. 

The Nikon 1 J1 and V1 are built around a one-inch 10MP CMOS sensor that is capable of both phase-detection and contrast-detection AF. The EVF-equipped V1 is aimed at a slightly higher level than the J1 but both are essentially intended to be used as point-and-shoot cameras. 
The Nikon 1 V1 pictured with the currently available 1 System lenses - (from right to left) the 10-30mm F3.5-5.6 VR, the 30-110mm F2.8-5.6 VR, the 10mm F2.8 pancake and the (comparatively) enormous 10-100mm F4.5-5.6 VR powerzoom.

Manual AF control, in-camera NEF editing and Effects filters 'for the future'

Still on the subject of Hybrid AF, which switches between contrast-detection and phase-detection AF modes automatically depending on light level, we asked Yamamoto why Nikon made this system entirely automatic. 'We are studying [manual AF mode control] for the future' he told us: 'for V1-class cameras we would like to do this manually but [AF mode selection in] J1-level models will remain automatic'.

Also potentially on the horizon for future 1 System models, Yamamoto told us, are in-camera NEF (raw) conversion, and in-camera 'Effects'. Asked why the first two functions were omitted from the J1 and V1, Yamamoto explained 'the J1 and V1 are in a new category, and [for these initial releases] we wanted to [focus on] enhancing basic functions like AF and introduce new ones like Motion Snapshot'. In the future though, he told us, 'we are studying the inclusion of [both] in-camera effects and raw conversion'.

'We may provide an option to customize Auto ISO in the future'

During the process of creating our in-depth review of the 1 System cameras, our experience of the J1 and V1’s Automatic ISO system has been that they constantly risk blurry images in low light by selecting low ISO sensitivity settings and relatively low shutter speeds. Yamamoto assured us 'we are aware of the issue'. But, he explained - 'the target user [for the J1/v1] is a point-and-shoot customer and for that user we thought that it was better to make [the function] purely automatic'.

'We always have to find a balance [between noise and sharpness]' he went on, 'but after having a lot of discussions and getting feedback we may need to come up with another option'. Encouragingly, he added that 'we may provide an option for customers to customize Auto ISO performance in the future'.

We ended the interview by asking Mr Yamamoto for his vision of the future, and whether mirrorless cameras will replace consumer-level DSLRs. 'We don't think so' Yamamoto told us - 'mirrorless is one solution [if the aim is] compactness but it is just one approach. We don't think it is the only direction, and we are considering further reductions in size even for [our DSLR] cameras'. 


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Comments

Total comments: 208
12
topstuff
By topstuff (Jan 31, 2012)

I think Nikon is very interesting because it proves a few things:

1.Sensor size is NOT everything. In the real world, people rarely print larger than A4. Plenty of people only view digitally perhaps using an ipad. The simple TRUTH of these situation is that larger sensors and therefore larger lenses and cameras are a waste of time for millions of people.

Someone talked into getting a NEX because "the sensor is larger and that is better" is wasting their time with a bigger lens and camera if they only print to A4 or look at the picture on a computer screen.

Nikon 1 delivers very good real world IQ.

2.Speed of operation and accurate AF and auto exposure is perhaps MORE important than IQ in a test lab. I have a NEX, and believe me the larger sensor is pointless if the pictures are out of focus because the camera cannot keep up with your kids. Nikon 1 does this better. Period.

3.Nikon really screwed up with the ISO function for beginners who dont know the work around.FIX IT!!

7 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Jan 31, 2012)

You're ignoring two properties as a result of sensor size that can also be clearly visible in smaller prints:
- DR. The Nikon has lower DR at base ISO than even some smaller P&S sensors (G12, S100 etc.)
- DOF control. With the smaller sensor and current native lineup, a Nikon V1/J1 is limited to up to 5 stops deeper DOF compared to say a NEX plus SEL 50mm F1.8.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
topstuff
By topstuff (Jan 31, 2012)

Yeah, maybe. I accept the DOF point but I guess this can be helped by more and faster lenses to a limited degree. But hey, I would take the compromise of small camera and lenses , fast AF, in exchange for certain circumstances like holidays. Its a price worth paying.
And as for DR, I am not sure I agree. In real world use, I am not sure the difference is great. I am looking right now at RAWS from a V1 and a NEX5N. Both look great. Both will print great. I dont see many problems with clipped highlights with the V1.

I also think the Nikon auto exposure is much "cleverer" than Sony. It seems to nail the exposure on auto with almost weird accuracy. :)

I think I may sell the Sony....

0 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Jan 31, 2012)

If you don't shoot RAW or don't use DRO like functions heavily, the DR differences might not be glaring, but once you start brightening (deeper) shadows, especially at lower ISO's, you'll notice a big difference. This also means that the technique of underexposing to preserve highlights in a very high DR scene and lifting shadows back in PP, becomes much more problematic for single exposures.

8 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Jan 31, 2012)

I agree with your point. I use m43, but I like this system much more than the Sony, because of the smaller size and the features.

IQ now is overkill in the digital world. I print at 8x10 most of the time, 4x6 occasionally, and 13x19 very occasionally, and I print much more than 99% of photographers. All modern cameras, even crappy point and shoots, do a decent job at 8x10.

What these manufacturers need to do now is offer features. That will differentiate one camera from another much more than subjective determinations of noise at 3200 ISO and their relationship to sensorship. I mean, c'mon, are you kidding me? I'm supposed to care about what some nerd pixel peeper thinks of my sensor size?

And I am so sick of hearing of "depth of field control". It is an advantage to have deep depth of field in many situations, without having to stop down the aperture and slow down the shutter speed. Bravo to Nikon, even though I haven't bought into this system yet.

2 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

Troj: for 99% of people that will use these camera, 11EV of DR is much more than they will be able to capture, and you still need RAW to do it properly (this is actually true for most dslr users as well). Re DOF, the factor from APS-C to Nikon 1 is 1.8, meaning that you need to divide both FL and f/number by 1.8 to get same DoF properties as APS-C. IMExp with APS-C, a portrait lens (85mm equiv) at f/2.8 already presents nice bokeh, thus one needs a 32mm f/1.6 for that, Nikon as a 32mm f/1.2 patent for CX mount. Now, again, most users of this camera won't know how to use aperture for proper bokeh control, but the difference is not so much from APS-C as you seem to think. Now, if you are really into DoF control, then FF is the way to go. ;)

0 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Jan 31, 2012)

Pretty much every camera displays less DR in jpegs than it can capture. That's not the point, the point is that the scene often exceeds the DR that even the camera can capture, let alone the jpegs. The camera *compresses* that DR, but if it can't capture it, there isn't much to compress. And features like ADL do exactly that, plus reveal shadow noise during the process of lifting shadows. So even for OOC jpegs it can be an issue.
-
As of now, there is up to 5 stops difference in DOF control with native lenses, that's a fact and it's massive. Often you hear the average consumer asking for faster AF for P&S cameras, but you also hear them ask for smooth bokeh, visual depth, the 3D effect or however they attempt to describe it. The latter is lacking in the current 1 system and its native lenses. That will undoubtly become less of a problem once faster lenses are brought to the market, but there's no firm release schedule for these fast primes, so that's more speculation at this point.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Jan 31, 2012)

You both have a point. I think it's easier to sort things by determining which we value more....is it the IQ or just taking a nice shot.
IQ is not really the point of this system. Yet, it still takes images which is not embarrassing to show.
My preference is IQ in a compact camera.

0 upvotes
Fullframer
By Fullframer (Feb 1, 2012)

Topstuff..
A big sensor and fast glass does matter if you shoot in low light indoor, no flash. That is one of the reasons why a D3S will enable you to get far better images then any V1 or smaller sensor camera. In the real world some people do print bigger than A4. A big camera/sensor maybe a waste for some people, but some people that shoot weddings/low light/sporting events like myself, it's a must. The V1 wouldn't be able to do that. Don't characterize that most people don't need a big sensor. It's about using the right tool for the right job.
If you want a camera to keep up with your kids, you will be using a decent DSLR with fast glass for the best results.

2 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 31, 2012)

Beside the faster lenses and the few fixes he mentioned, what I wish for in the V2 is a standard hot shoe and more buttons, as well as a more ergonomically correct design and better grip. The J1/V1 are pure and simple the ugliest cameras I have ever seen and adding to that the poor usability is a really bad combination.

2 upvotes
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Jan 31, 2012)

I actually prefer the custom hotshoe. I like the tiny SB-N5 flash. There's no way I'm going to put a full size flash like the SB600 on a V1. The flash is better than the camera. I wouldn't like that. I want some firmware updates to offer more customization and of course faster lenses. Beyond that, I like the V1 as is. I do hope they offer another version later that has more external controls. Simple things you always want quick access to.

3 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 31, 2012)

Yes, well, maybe the SB600/700/800/900 are a bit too big, but using standard hot shoe does not exclude Nikon from designing small flashes to the system.

1 upvote
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

Have you really used a V1? I thought same as you until I held one and used it. It's very nice actually.

3 upvotes
YouDidntDidYou
By YouDidntDidYou (Jan 31, 2012)

Looks like I was proved correct that the Nikon1 system will only do moderately well and only in North America.

3 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

Look at the current Japan bestsellers:

http://www.dslrphoto.com/dslr/space.php?do=jranking&view=all

They are doing very well among ML systems, actually beating Sony and Oly by a good margin and right there with Panny.

2 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (Jan 31, 2012)

Nah, your wrong as usual. Its selling well. Outselling Oly, but thats nothing to brag about.

1 upvote
AnHund
By AnHund (Jan 31, 2012)

They are selling well because the N1s are great little cameras.

0 upvotes
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Jan 31, 2012)

I am surprised that Canon does so well in that list. I thought Nikon was particularly strong in Japan.

0 upvotes
jasonasselin
By jasonasselin (Jan 31, 2012)

really guy? canon does well in the mirrorless section?

1 upvote
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Jan 31, 2012)

The list he referenced is not limited to mirrorless.

1 upvote
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Jan 31, 2012)

Come on, micro 4/3 fanboys and girls. Get over it. The Nikon 1 (like many other manufacturers cameras out there) are a good solution for quite a few people. It may not be what YOU want, but if you can set your prejudices aside for a moment, you might realize the Nikon 1 has a lot to offer (even though it may not be what you decide to buy). Get over yourselves....geez. ;-) My V1 certainly seems to be making lots of great images. I don't find myself crying over the sale of my GH2. Not one bit. Some examples: http://www.openbloom.com/GEAR-Etc-1/Nikon-1-V1/19648888_Nn5D4F

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Jan 31, 2012)

It's just different markets, Nikon 1 not really in the same boat as m4/3. Also it's really immature system. For now it's just a good quality p/s. Why some m4/3 users might be offended is, Nikon 1 is in different category, but many of them hoped for new choices with similar features. Same what happened with Canon G1X, it was not what m4/3 crowd hoped for :)

1 upvote
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 31, 2012)

I can not for my life understand why the MFT crowd wants to make every mirrorless camera into an MFT. It seems that they lack fantasy and imagination, and can not learn to live with the fact that somebody else can also make great mirrorless cameras without joining that MFT consortium. Those people should get out more and take more images, not just spend their time on this forum. The Nikon 1 system certainly has some weak points, but so does every other system as well, no matter who makes it.

2 upvotes
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Jan 31, 2012)

There's no reason for ANYONE to be offended. I guess that's my point. It's just a camera. Either you like what it has to offer and you buy it...or you don't. Why people on discussion forums have to get so personal and make childish comments about competing brands is beyond me. Talk about the pros/cons of the system, sure....but just make drive-by "mine is better than yours" type of comments, no.

4 upvotes
Mal_In_Oz
By Mal_In_Oz (Jan 31, 2012)

Out there in the minds of photographers is the ideal compact system camera. The ideal is a little different for everyone, but when a manufacturer finds the right middle ground then all the companies will copy it to death. m43 is close but not there yet. Nikon 1 has some of the missing pieces so is very tantalising, but further from the ideal than m43 in my opinion. NEX has the IQ but is slow and has limited lens selection. The Canon has IQ but no flexibility and is too big (for what it is).

So when I see a manufacturer do something that doesn't fit my ideal I feel like slapping them and saying nooooo, go this way, not over there with poor DR, no depth of field control or body too big. I think its a natural reaction and I mean no harm to those that love their G's, 1's, NEX's or m43's.

My guess is that when all the dust settles in a few years all the CSCs will be very close to ideal and we will be hard pressed to find differences between them. I just wish it didn't take this long.

1 upvote
fmian
By fmian (Jan 31, 2012)

Mal_In_Oz
In my opinion the perfect compact system camera is my Minolta X700 with various prime lenses.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcZuCMxbSGg

All the big camera players got it right 30-40 years ago.
It's time for consumers to stop buying a new half measured attempt at a camera every year, and show the current marketing driven manufacturers that second hand is better than the rubbish they are trying to feed us.

2 upvotes
Fullframer
By Fullframer (Feb 1, 2012)

I agree, the Nikon 1 is a very good point and shoot replacement, EXCEPT the price is ridiculous. I went M4/3 GF3 and Leica F1.4 lens. It gives far better bokeh/depth of field than the V1 can, and after the holiday pricing it was actually less $$ than the V1.. These cameras don't replace DSLR for serious/pro work, the people that think that are just kidding themselves.

0 upvotes
Jay Kim
By Jay Kim (Jan 31, 2012)

Okay. I was thinking of buying the V1 very soon. But from what he is saying, it sounds as though we may see a newer V1 class body coming soon. (maybe around Sep?)

1 upvote
Mal_In_Oz
By Mal_In_Oz (Jan 31, 2012)

I would not draw that conclusion. It seems that Mr Yamamoto has learnt the fine art of marketing speak. He has drawn your attention to improving the already impressive AF performance with faster glass, without mentioning the weakness of the 1 system being a lack of fast glass, and disguising the story with a 'better total performance' tag. Well done Mr Yamamoto.

So my conclusion is that you will soon see some fast primes in your tea leaves.

2 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

I agree, in this fast moving market Nikon needs to bring updated bodies soon, likely by end of NH Summer. They were actually smart: tested waters with two bodies, listen to reactions, incoporate what is feasible in the new versions. And likely launch a different, more able body as well. It's only starting.

0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (Jan 31, 2012)

So basically, he's saying that in the future Nikon may give its users some of the features that have been available in other mirrorless systems from the start. This is the sort of press release that will make Olympus feel good.

3 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

Hmm, I think you should go back and check how long it took for the first lenses and different bodies to show up in m43.

1 upvote
CriticalI
By CriticalI (Jan 31, 2012)

And when are MFT going to offer some features already available on the Nikon 1?

1 upvote
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (Jan 31, 2012)

Yes, let's go back to early 2009 and see that Panasonic released the G1 with a 14 - 45mm kit zoom and a 45- 200mm telephoto. We also see that Panasonic released a 4/3 adapter around the same time, allowing users to fit all those nice Olympus lenses. Maybe you should go back and check the spec. sheet of the G1 and compare it to the Nikon V1. No excuses for leaving out basic control parameters. Cynical marketing from company reluctant to compete in the mirrorless market.

1 upvote
fmian
By fmian (Jan 31, 2012)

Giving an arbitrary time frame for improvements in future models is not good enough when other manufacturers have products coming out in the next few months that will eat the Nikon1 camera sales.

All I get from this is:

- Those who have already purchased a N1 camera can look forward to brighter lenses in the 'future'.
- Those who have not purchased a N1 camera should hold off because big improvements will be made in 'future' bodies.

0 upvotes
TEBnewyork
By TEBnewyork (Jan 31, 2012)

His comments clearly didn't sound as if they were thinking about any sort of firmware enhancements to the J1/V1 in the "near" future. In addition, it didn't sound all that promising that more lenses were going to appear any time real soon.

I do like using the V1 a lot but I hope Nikon realizes there is some time pressure as other systems march forward in a full system buildout.

0 upvotes
zstan
By zstan (Jan 31, 2012)

If you want to shoot at f1.0 at still have a lot of depth of field, look no further than this camera!!

3 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jan 31, 2012)

This is only half true. If you have a 50mm F1.0....it will have the SAME DOF on any camera you put it on. Now if you have a 18.5mm F1 lens, then the DOP would be much deeper.

0 upvotes
jasonasselin
By jasonasselin (Jan 31, 2012)

lol, come on. haha looks like somebody doest get it. zstan so your saying when you crop your pictures all of a sudden, bingo more dof? oh goodness i thought full frame had less dof!! naw. you can just focus closer as your fov is wider, thats what shrinks the dof.

0 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (Jan 31, 2012)

Am I treading this right and Nikon is considering a firmware to deal with the blurry pictures issue??? Are they loosing it? That would be a first...

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (Jan 31, 2012)

Never got any blurry pictures. This camera is so easy to use and nails focus much better than any other camera in its class like the 4/3'rds. And as an added bonus it has better high ISO performance.

1 upvote
JesperMP
By JesperMP (Jan 31, 2012)

New faster lenses is good news.

Just dont like that he argues that it is needed for fast AF only.
Faster lenses are neded for better low-light noise performance, and in order to be able to isolate the subject by letting the background be out of focus.
Its like he dont want to acknowledge that this is a problem with the 1 and its smaller sensor.
Fuji totally gets this, with 3 fast primes at launch for the X-pro 1.

In order to get the subject isolation, it would be great if the lenses are significantly brighter. Like f.1.2.

2 upvotes
panos_m
By panos_m (Jan 31, 2012)

I believe that Nikon's design goal for the 1 system was deep DOF. At least this is how I interpret this video interview:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Hbwecuicpfw

0 upvotes
JesperMP
By JesperMP (Jan 31, 2012)

Panos, that is the good old way of responding to complaints over bugs or deficiencies, that it is intended that way and it is actually a "feature".

1 upvote
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

Tend to agree with Panos, but they have patents for quite fast primes, a f/1.4 normal and a f/1.2 portrait lens. If they will release them is another story. What I would really like to see is a faster, better Q midrange zoom. The kit one is not that good and quite slow.

0 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (Jan 31, 2012)

Get a FF for shallow DOF. It is so much better than an APS-C like the X-Pro 1.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Jan 31, 2012)

we need especially brighter WA lenses. a 35mm equivalent f1.4 or f1.2.
that would be great. a 24mm equivalent f2.4 is highly desirable too.

0 upvotes
EOS Photographer
By EOS Photographer (Jan 31, 2012)

Is Nikon actually admitting that they were wrong with the V1/J1?
These problems are not solved with faster lenses, but with a bigger sensor.

2 upvotes
topstuff
By topstuff (Jan 31, 2012)

I do not even own a Nikon 1, but your comment cannot be more wrong. It is incorrect on every level.

First off, the Nikon 1 is very successful.

Secondly, the sensor size really is not an issue. Even pro's using the camera admit that IQ is perfectly good.

Thirdly, one of the reasons why the 1 has superior AF and speed of operation compared to any other compact camera, is the tech used and its relationship with the smaller lenses and the sensor.

If the sensor was larger, the lenses would be larger. It would be harder to have fast AF. The camera would lose its appeal.

The telephoto zoom on the 1, for example, is tiny compared to the equivalent in m4/3rds or NEX. And its AF is lightning fast.

Lets put it this way - I fell for the "sensor is too small" argument and got a NEX. A mistake - I have since seen amazing IQ from a friend with a V1 and it is clear that the V1 is way, way faster than the NEX and with much, much better AF. And the lenses are much smaller.

7 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (Jan 31, 2012)

I'm sorry but I have to strongly disagree.

The sensor size is indeed an issue but not for the reasons you mention. It's an issue when the body and all but one of the lenses are as big as m43 counterparts. It's not an issue when it comes to IQ, if (but only IF) you consider the Olympus Pen's quality good enough. Compared to the GH2, G3 or GX1, IQ it is indeed an issue. Speed of operation is not something that depends on sensor size either, apart from AF, but have you read the news? Compacts are now focusing in low light in 0.1s.

Yes, the NEX is slow, the lenses are big but it's IQ is almost unmatched. Use that to your advantage! If your need is fast AF and monster burst rates you have clearly entered the wrong boat because you should have got the Nikon. If you think you'd need to strike a balance between very good IQ, size, lens ecosystem and AF, then m43 is the only way to go. But do yourself a favour: get one of the Panasonics latest sensors. It pays off. In spades!!!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
YouDidntDidYou
By YouDidntDidYou (Jan 31, 2012)

@topstuff
the Nikon 1 system isn't selling well in the United Kingdom (unless you can back this up with some hard facts).

1 upvote
YSLaiHK
By YSLaiHK (Jan 31, 2012)

I don't think you actually own a V1 or J1, that's why you believe the what-so-call 'focusing in low light in 0.1s' is comparable to the AF performance of the Nikon 1 system.

Only when you have the Nikon 1 in hand that you realize how good it works. Others can make up nice looking numbers that only work under certain conditions.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
1 upvote
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Jan 31, 2012)

There are two more IQ handicaps (asside from overall noise performance compared to NEX). One is the very limited DOF control. Partially due to the small sensor, partially due to the current small aperture lenses. To match the DOF control of the SEL 50mm F1.8, they need to come up with a 28mm F1.0.
The second problem that is often ignored is the limited DR, especially at lower ISO's it's several stops behind NEX cameras, also due to high read noise in shadows. To the point where higher end P&S cameras with much smaller sensor such as the G11, G12, S100 and X10 show better DR at base ISO.

5 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

AF is very important and the main reason many people avoid using regular compacts (my case with the Canon G9, never really took it on a trip in place of the dslr). With the V1 I'm sure I will get the shutter to release when I press it, not an intant later when the photo opp is gone. It's IQ is not up to APS-C's present standards, true, but actually very close to the camera I used for 4 years (D80), and which provided for many memorable images. It's quite close to even present m43 offerings, loosing only to the latest Panny models.

1 upvote
CriticalI
By CriticalI (Jan 31, 2012)

You don't seem to understand that all this stuff you waffle on and on about is completely irrelevant for most consumers.

1 upvote
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Jan 31, 2012)

Are you telling me you've never heard most consumers ask for creamy backgrounds or a 3D depth effect? I certainly have, atleast as often as I heard them ask for fast focus.
They might be less aware of dynamic range, true. But up to 5 stops DOF (3.5-4 if we cheat a little and use a slightly longer FL) control and noise differences in low light due to the current line up of lenses, *is* something they will notice.
And simply put, if they and we ignore it for whatever reason, it's unlikely going to change. On the other hand, if the consumer conveys that message, it's likely you'll see some fast lenses rather sooner than later.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (Jan 31, 2012)

Funny ! All what they want to add is already present in MFT cameras.
( except what concerns the sensor speed and hybrid AF mode )

5 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 31, 2012)

rrr_hhh, you said:

"Funny ! All what they want to add is already present in MFT cameras."

Yet you make a list of what is NOT in the MFT...

"( except what concerns the sensor speed and hybrid AF mode )"

...and your list could be extended a lot longer. I bet you have never seen a V1, even less handled one or looked at the specs and functionalities. But, if MFT is what you want then just buy one. The G3 is really nice, as well as the GH2 so go buy one of those and be happy.

2 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

AF is a BIG point, believe me, I have used it, it's like a dslr in almost all situations, maybe a tad faster than my D7000.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
digifan
By digifan (Jan 31, 2012)

E-P3 is faster than DSLR and when compared with V1 there's nothing in it. The only advantage the Nikon 1 has is CAF, SAF E-P3 is as fast or faster!!!!

0 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (Jan 31, 2012)

I can assure you that the N1s has faster AF and better high ISO capability than the E-P3.

1 upvote
Dazed and Confused
By Dazed and Confused (Jan 31, 2012)

'we are considering further reductions in size even for [our DSLR] cameras'

Best news ever! A full frame DSLR in an FM size body, please!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
Nismo350Z
By Nismo350Z (Jan 31, 2012)

Since it will take some time before that happens, let's start with the D800 in a D7000-sized body...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 31, 2012)

I am still waiting for the D800 and the D400... I hope they'll release those before your miniature FF.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 31, 2012)

Yes, could be the D7000 body with the D4's sensor ;).

1 upvote
Total comments: 208
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