Enthusiast compact camera roundup

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II


1" 20MP BSI-CMOS sensor | 28-100mm equivalent F1.8-4.9 lens | NFC mediated Wi-Fi


What we like:

  • Large sensor in small body
  • Useful lens range
  • Expandability

What we don't:

  • Unengaging shooting experience
  • Relatively high price
  • JPEG color

Following up on the heels of the well-received Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100, the RX100 II promises better low light performance, faster AF, and the option to add a viewfinder/flash/remote trigger via the hotshoe mount. NFC-enabled, built-in Wi-Fi is also a nice addition to transfer images.

"For anyone looking for the best image quality from a compact, the RX100 II is the answer"

The RX100 II's relatively large 1"-type sensor produces superbly detailed JPEGs, albeit with slightly underwhelming color. When comparing image quality to other compact-sized cameras, it's peerless. However when comparing to Micro Four Thirds and APS-C sensor cameras at its price point, the RX100 II starts to fall short in high ISO and dynamic range performance.

The appeal to camera enthusiasts is boosted by the addition of the Multi-Interface hot shoe (which allows use of external flashes and an electronic viewfinder), and a rear LCD screen that now tilts up and down. Sadly it retains the RX100's clickless wheel, and an interface that can leave the user feeling rather disconnected from the shooting experience.

For anyone simply looking for the best image quality from a compact, the RX100 II is the answer, but the experience of shooting with the camera can be vague, thanks to the lack of feedback from the controls - which is the only thing stopping us declaring the RX100 II a classic.


Studio Test SceneSpecifications Compared | Aperture Comparison


Sample photoSample photoSample photoSample photoSample photo
75
I own it
45
I want it
26
I had it
Discuss in the forums
517
I own it
340
I want it
91
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 216
12
BarnET
By BarnET (1 week ago)

I am missing the Ricoh GR.

It's IQ is better then all of the ones on this list yet there isn't a single mention.
Did it get excluded for the larger sensor. Then why is the much larger RX10 on the top of this list.

the Ricoh GR is a defining enthousiast compact. With it's outstanding lens and 16mp no olpf sensor. It's an street photographer workhorse.

Just like the Fujifilm x100s which is excluded.

1 upvote
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (2 weeks ago)

While offering a unique and excellent feature set in a relatively small body, this is not a camera that most of us would call a compact. By size and price, I think that comparing it to a small MFT would be more realistic. Now the problem is wrapping your head around a camera that is so capable but has a fix lens. But the EVF and LCD are great and the zoom is a magnificent 24-200mm f/2.8, a range that encompasses most photography, and try to buy it as an interchangeable lens ... The body is weather-resistant too ... It looks to me that this camera, while clashing with a generally accepted camera design, offers a tremendous bang for the buck for landscape, travel, family and associated photography. It warrants a trip to B&H and some playtime.

1 upvote
jeffinchiangmai1
By jeffinchiangmai1 (3 weeks ago)

Last night I had a pool party. I used my Panasonic GM1 with f.1.7 Olympus lens. I was taking bright pictures In dim light without flash and also with flash. I took videos, bright and clear and the face recognition was constantly working on multiple faces. Then I thought I would try the Olympus XZ1 withe the f.1.8 lens. I like this little camera but there was no comparison with the GM1, in fact the difference was extremely noticeable.
I also have the GX7 and the Olympus E-M5 but with the GM1, I have no need for these bulky cameras. I just love the tiny GM1.
Just miss an evf on road trips because of the very bright light in Thailand.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (3 weeks ago)

The logarithmic scale of the X axis in a way hides the huge range of some of the cameras going to 200 and 300mm equiv. with most of the other lenses going up to 100mm.
At first it looks strange how Canon lens engineers managed to outperform all others by making their lens faster at all equiv. apertures while still having virtually the same range, untill you look closely at the numbers on the X axis and realise their lens is 5x while some others are 8x or more.
Also if compact cameras are considered ones with fixed lenses (non interchangeable) then probably the Nikon Collpix A and Sony RX1 should be put there as well as dots (having fixed focal lengths)

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

Actually, the log scale shows the difference in field of view that you get at each focal length.

100mm is twice as zoomed-in as 50mm (half the field of view) 200mm is twice as zoomed-in again, so it represented by the same distance. 300mm is only 50% more zoomed-in, so the distance on the scale is essentially the same as the difference between 24mm and 35mm, since that's closer to the perceptual difference.

4 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (2 weeks ago)

I am not sure that your first sentence quite makes sence, I understand you wanted to show the magnification capability of the lenses on the X axis. The problem is that due to the way logarithmic scales work everything to the left gets exagerrated, and not all of the lenses shown start at the same focal length. e.g. if you had a 10-20 lens we would see a very long line longer than all of the ones shown even if the lens is only 2x.
A 10-20 zoom might be of great use to some, but the graph will make it look like having a greater range than the 11x Oly (I think) which is 28-300!

1 upvote
MaxTux
By MaxTux (2 weeks ago)

I would suggest that the abscissa ("focal-length axis") on this graph should be neither linear nor logarithmic in focal length, but instead linear in diagonal angle of view, and marked, as it is in the above, in millimeters of 24x36 equivalent focal length.

0 upvotes
CarVac
By CarVac (2 weeks ago)

The log scale is with 100% certainty the correct choice for that graph.

0 upvotes
atalaya
By atalaya (3 weeks ago)

I initially bought an RX100 to fill the gap between my OMD M1 and my iPhone 5S. But, I ended giving up on it.
1. I find it almost impossible to do serious photography in bright daylight without a view finder. 2. The camera was very fiddly to use. 3. The color on the JPEG's is way too cool and I was never able to correct for this in post processing.

I replaced it with a LX7 with the optional EVF. Unlike the Sony, this camera is a joy to use. And, in a back-to-back comparison of the same subjects taken at the same time with both cameras I preferred the LX7 pic the RX100 pic every time.

I recently spent 2 weeks in Paris with the LX7. I didn't think it was worth carrying the M1 for the small amount of time I would have for photos in grey January weather — and I didn't fancy looking like a tourist.

The pics were all excellent — including people and action shots taken at a night time PSG soccer game. Great to have an unobtrusive little camera with a a fast lens.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
atalaya
By atalaya (3 weeks ago)

I would suggest that the RX-10 is most likely to be cross-shopped against the both the super zoom bridge cameras (e.g. Panasonic FZ-200) and MFT and APS-C cameras.

I tend to think of it as a quite big, and quite expensive super zoom with a considerably larger sensor and a shorter maximum zoom range.

For me, an enthusiast compact camera is one that I will choose when my iPhone 5S will not be sufficient but I want something much smaller, lighter and less obtrusive than my OMD M1.

I would have to really need the reach of that 200mm zoom to choose an RX10 over, say, an OMD M10 with a decent zoom lens.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (3 weeks ago)

Maybe, bridge camera still applies. Even though this is an awfully expensive one.

0 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (3 weeks ago)

I still think this camera is in the compact category since it is simply not in a DSLR with a mirror. The abilities and price though is pretty much far from the established category........ because it is just well ahead from its category just like the RX1.

0 upvotes
dwm2020
By dwm2020 (3 weeks ago)

I fail to see how the RX10 is considered a 'compact' camera, beside it having a small sensor.

Why is the sony different from other Bridge cameras and not considered one?

4 upvotes
zxaar
By zxaar (3 weeks ago)

if you can't see why RX10 is a compact then you must have no clue of photography. For us who understand this art we know anything that is this small with this lens is compact.

1 upvote
dwm2020
By dwm2020 (2 weeks ago)

So educate me and give me the Specs that make this a 'compact' camera as opposed to a bridge/super zoom. I clearly don't understand what compact means, or understand the Art of photography, since photography is ALL about knowing the terminology and what the latest gadgets are, and not taking photos. I see DSLR's that are around the same size (K3, Canon XSi) are they considered to be compact in comparison as well? So tell me again how is this compact compared to others in the category? Is it just because of the lens and FL it has?

Again, please outline the 'ART of Photography's' definition of compact.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
1 upvote
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (2 weeks ago)

Disrespectful, misguided comment that disregards the feelings of most of our fellow commentators. I do not not know who the "us who understand this art" are. I have been a successful fine art photographer for decades, have worked with more film and digital gear that I can shake a stick at, have a truckload of awards, write about and teach the art but still agree with dwm2020 100%. Please stay out of this forum if you cannot maintain a civilized discourse.

3 upvotes
Tonio Loewald
By Tonio Loewald (2 weeks ago)

Why get bent out of shape over categories?

This camera clearly doesn't fit into existing categories terribly well. If the RX100 is a large sensor compact, it seems that is a large sensor bridge/superzoom.

1 upvote
CarVac
By CarVac (2 weeks ago)

The RX10 is waaaay smaller than a DSLR with an 18-135mm lens.

http://camerasize.com/compact/#489,333.25,ha,t

No contest.

The reason it's included in this is it is more of an enthusiast camera than a typical bridge camera.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
b craw
By b craw (2 weeks ago)

I, too, have taught photography for over a decade and fail to understand what zxaar is suggesting - what well known consensus exists between experts relating to this topic. And, the tone unfortunately demonstrates a rather ugly territorial tendency present among too many photographers.

0 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (1 week ago)

Carvac it's the same size as an mirrorless with more reacht

http://j.mp/1hv7Zu0
I used the 12-35mm since they don't have the Pana14-140mm F3.5-5.6 yet. The lenses are roughly the same size.

The Sony is faster at the long end though and is stellar in video

0 upvotes
Loremax
By Loremax (3 weeks ago)

I am a one camera kind of guy. Need the camera for travel and taking pics of our kids when performing on stage (ballet), which means I need to zoom in on moving people in low light conditions. Our Canon Power Shot sx200Is is not doing the job. Trying to decide between the Olympus Stylus 1 which has the 10x zoom or the Sony rx100II which has the larger sensor (might require cropping). I would appreciate the opinions of sophisticated photographers as to which camera will deliver better pics under intended use. Thanks.

0 upvotes
mrdancer
By mrdancer (3 weeks ago)

Look at that RX-10! It gives a whole new meaning to "F8 and be there..."!

0 upvotes
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (3 weeks ago)

...with diffraction

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (1 week ago)

Indeed The Sony is better to keep between f2.8 and at most F5.6

0 upvotes
George Veltchev
By George Veltchev (3 weeks ago)

G1 X Mark II is the answer folks ... just read the above graphic carefully !

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (3 weeks ago)

The lens of MkII is VERY ambitious. Frankly, I don't think it'll be able to deliver the same IQ as the G1X, particularly not wide open and at 24mm equiv.

Hope I'm wrong though...

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (3 weeks ago)

Yeah, the size and specs of G1 X Mark II scream "poorly corrected lens, lots of software correction and less sharp images than you would expect." To be fair, we don't know for sure yet.

We do know that it doesn't have a viewfinder, though...

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (3 weeks ago)

Tried the P7800 EVF, it was a joke.

The worst EVF ever made.

They should have put the same EVF of the V1.

0 upvotes
DigitalMission
By DigitalMission (3 weeks ago)

This Sony RX10 should be compared by PRICE to some DSLR cameras!!!! It looks like A LOT of people posting on here agree that this is not a "compact" camera. Don't you think people compare more on body-size and price? I DO! Hope DPReview is listening. Compare this interesting camera with some of the non-compacts and even a DSLR or two!

6 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (3 weeks ago)

Did I miss the complaints about the lack of a FF sensor?

1 upvote
EXX
By EXX (3 weeks ago)

LOL. You have a point though: where is the Sony RX-1?

0 upvotes
ravinj
By ravinj (3 weeks ago)

As noted by others, RX10 is an outlier and does not really belong here. The only thing compact about it is the sensor size. An E-PL5 with a 14-42 or 14-45 is equally compact, more capable and price is lower. The only possible argument for keeping RX10 in this category is that its lens is 24-200 equiv @F2.8 constant aperture and with that in mind, it is compact compared to the alternatives.

Sony RX100II is the "true" compact and should be ranked #1.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (3 weeks ago)

On what planet is an E-PL5 with 14-42mm even close to an RX10?

4 upvotes
minzaw
By minzaw (3 weeks ago)

Compact=?? definition

1 upvote
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (3 weeks ago)

fixed lens

0 upvotes
minzaw
By minzaw (2 weeks ago)

ALL bridge camera have fixed lens>> compacts>??
Non pocketable>> compacts?

0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (2 weeks ago)

It is compact, iff every open cover of it has finite subcover.

If we're talking Euclidean, then it's the same thing as being closed and bounded at the same time

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
joe6pack
By joe6pack (3 weeks ago)

An enthusiast COMPACT? Nice try. I'm not falling for your April Fool's prank.

7 upvotes
CDC1
By CDC1 (3 weeks ago)

How would the Fujifilm XQ1 compare to these? It looks like it should be pretty competitive.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

The XQ1 did OK but didn't especially stand out in the High-end pocketable compact roundup.

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (3 weeks ago)

The RX10 is clearly in the wrong category. Except for the fact that it's kit lens can't be removed, it lines up much more closely with the K3, the 70D, and the D7100. It's every bit as expensive and the dimmensions aren't that dissimilar. It's "fixed" kit lens compares very similarly to the 18-135/140 lenses that those cameras have. A little slower at wide, a little faster at tele, very similar range. And the price of all the cameras I mentioned here was within $100 unlike this hodgepodge category it got lumped into.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

It's not a camera that fits terribly well into any of the categories.

We have a long-term plan for how to deal with situation, but putting a fixed lens camera into a DSLR roundup isn't the answer.

The RX10 review - linked from this roundup - makes clear that its nearest competitor in many respects is the Sony a6000 with 18-105mm F4.

19 upvotes
2eyesee
By 2eyesee (3 weeks ago)

I'm with mosc on this. The RX10 is much more comparable with a DSLR with big zoom (e.g. D5300 + 18-140mm). You could never refer to the RX10 as a compact camera - size, weight, price and zoom range are much closer to DLSR.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

2eyesee - I'm not arguing that an APS-C camera with longish zoom isn't a relevant comparison (which is why we make precisely those comparisons in the RX10 review).

However these roundups are by common category and, while the RX10 doesn't fit well into any category, it makes more sense here than anywhere else. Here it's alongside other cameras with comparatively bright zoom lenses with a moderately-sized sensor, which makes some (if not perfect) sense. Whereas no amount of bulk or cost suddenly makes it a DSLR.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
8 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (3 weeks ago)

Also, regardless of size, weight, price and zoom range, there's a fundamental difference between fixed-lens cameras (usually referred to as compact cameras, regardless of size) and interchangeable lens cameras.

4 upvotes
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (3 weeks ago)

R Butler writes... "It's not a camera that fits terribly well into any of the categories."

How about the bridge camera category?

2 upvotes
2eyesee
By 2eyesee (3 weeks ago)

@Richard: Well, you've got all the 'Likes' - no love for mosc or myself :( So while I respectfully disagree, I do appear to be in the minority on the matter.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

@2eyesee - Likes or not, I do take your point. We're looking to be able to present this information in a number of better ways, so that there would be roundups based on price, or capability, rather than simply class/category.

So, while we need to make do with this for now, in the long run I hope we can satisfy both approaches.

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (3 weeks ago)

I appreciate the discussion. I think it's a growing problem for the website as the lines blur. We no longer have a 1/2.33" vs APS-C sensor gap to nicely bucket things into. We have plenty of small sensor cameras with interchangeable lenses (Q, 1, NX-M) and lots of big sensors with fixed lenses (RX1, X100, CP-A, etc). Put another way, SLR's are becoming more like bridge cameras and bridge cameras are becoming more like SLR's. The RX10 is equal parts both in my mind.

OVF doesn't an SLR make, look at the m4/3rds with EVF's and the Sony A-mount line (if they ever make another). Sensor sizes are similarly all over the place. The RX10 shouldn't be thought of as less capable than a 1 series nikon ILC for example, the RX10 covers nearly the entire lens SERIES range with the same senor area!

Dimensions and capability make for better groupings than sensor sizes or ILC flexibility.

0 upvotes
2eyesee
By 2eyesee (2 weeks ago)

@Richard: Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate you guys taking the time to enter into the debates in the comments section - especially when you have such a full review schedule.

1 upvote
deep7
By deep7 (3 weeks ago)

"While image quality in this class won't compete with a good mirrorless camera paired with a good lens". Actually, the G1X certainly competes. I have an EM1 and good lenses and a G1X and speak from experience. In fact, the G1X image quality is every bit as good as the Canon 60D I recently sold.

Then again, is the G1X series really in the same class as the others? Only on body size. Better to think of the original as a Fuji X100 with a zoom lens and crappy viewfinder...

4 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (3 weeks ago)

I think DPReview should include Nikon 1, m4/3", and 18-135/140 for APS-C.

a user may mistake RX10 for a higher category (for the misleading "f/2.8 lens" for example) so better include those cameras even if they are not in the same league.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph Mama
By Joseph Mama (3 weeks ago)

Agreed. Why exactly would it NOT compete? Its got a larger than 4/3rd sensor. RX10 is no slouch either. Heck for 1300 bucks it had BETTER be pretty decent...

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

In the RX10 review, you'll find that camera compared to two APS-C cameras with 18-1XXmm lenses (Canon 1.6x crop and 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 and Sony 1.5 crop with 18-105mm F4). In fact, go to the review today and you'll find we've already added the G1 X II to the chart.

Nobody is suggesting the G1 X II and RX10 don't compete with interchangeable lens cameras (hence those comparisons being explicitly made in the review). However, this chart is taken from a comparison of fixed lens, moderate sensor size cameras, and is quite crowded enough just making those comparison.

5 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (3 weeks ago)

My quote was taken directly from the article!

I'll admit that I don't know if a G1XII is as good as a G1X and I understand that the statement was a general one applied to a range of small sensor cameras but my point remains valid (and didn't apply to the RX10).

I think Canon made a mistake with the G1X in that they "disguised" it as a G-series camera. Had they taken the concept but given it a unique form (and added an electronic view finder!), it might have had a better reception. As it is, most people don't really understand what it is.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (3 weeks ago)

"I'll admit that I don't know if a G1XII is as good as a G1X "

No one knows. The lens of MkII is VERY ambitious. Frankly, I don't think it'll be able to deliver the same IQ as the G1X, particularly not wide open and at 24mm equiv.

Hope I'm wrong though...

0 upvotes
technic
By technic (3 weeks ago)

@ Menneisyys:
it's difficult for the G1X to compete at 24mm or f/2 ... ;-)

I guess the best one can hope for is that the G1X II is at least as good as the G1X at the same focal length and aperture, said otherwise f/2 24mm, macro mode etc. is 'better than nothing'. My impression is that the G1X Ii lens is very soft wide open and that you need to stop down at least 1-2 stops for decent corners; not really a camera for landscape type photographers but possibly great for low light people/event photography and similar stuff.

0 upvotes
technic
By technic (3 weeks ago)

@ deep7:
" In fact, the G1X image quality is every bit as good as the Canon 60D I recently sold."

A 60D without lens doesn't have any image quality. Or do you think that IQ is just a function of the sensor?

0 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (3 weeks ago)

"A 60D without lens doesn't have any image quality. Or do you think that IQ is just a function of the sensor?"

Good grief!

0 upvotes
JABB66
By JABB66 (3 weeks ago)

Hello

There's a chance to add some day the Casio Ex-10 or the not announced here Ex-100? Thank you :)

Jose

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (3 weeks ago)

We've been promised an EX-100, but haven't yet received it.

In terms of the aperture diagram, the EX-10 will be the same as the Olympus XZ-2 and the EX-100 will be the same as the Stylus 1, since they appear to use the same lenses.

Comment edited 11 seconds after posting
1 upvote
ageha
By ageha (3 weeks ago)

Amazon can't afford to buy one for you guys?

0 upvotes
fuxicek
By fuxicek (1 month ago)

I am an enthusiast but unfortunately money is (yes) factor to me... so I got Canon sx150 for 90 euro, film camera Canon 3000v for 20 euro and 50mm lens for 120 euro... and smartphone, samsung galaxy ace, this is s-it, but still better than nothing :)

fail to post the new comment because it contains swear words.... ok ok, I´ve fixed that s-it already :D

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
oldman1234
By oldman1234 (3 months ago)

Have several of the Sony camera including rx100....Migrated from Minolta to Sony. About 3000 in cameras 3000 in lenses..Guess what the $95 point and shoot does 95 percent of any of the highend camera. The present day digital camera has 20 more years to catch up with film......if ever

0 upvotes
skytripper
By skytripper (2 months ago)

"The present day digital camera has 20 more years to catch up with film......if ever"

Baloney! Even pros struggled to capture low-noise photos in low light in the days of film. In a head-to-head test of low-light capability, even the best film camera would fail miserably because of the limits of film.

10 upvotes
DStudio
By DStudio (2 months ago)

"The present day digital camera has 20 more years to catch up with film......if ever"

Or so it would seem, because it's been this way with other technologies that have moved to digital, like audio.

While there are still good reasons to use film, there are so many advantages to going digital that it's been nearly universally adopted, from the top to the bottom (Pros and amateurs alike).

Perhaps it has more to do with cost and accessibility. Clyde Butcher makes fantastic photos (you really need to see the large prints to appreciate them), but he has to lug around relatively exotic 8x10 or larger cameras - plus he's a skilled print maker. But you only have to plug in a $300 turntable to hear the advantages of analog audio.

0 upvotes
Haim Hadar
By Haim Hadar (3 weeks ago)

True only in one aspect - power consumption. In all others Digital has already far exceeded film...

5 upvotes
dynaxx
By dynaxx (3 weeks ago)

The switch to digital for photography, video and audio is driven by profitability and convenience, not the pursuit of improved quality. Just listen to a good record on a good turntable with the same speakers as used with a SACD.

Scaling up film ( 4"X 5" film , equivalent to 200 megapixels , 5 X 7 and 8 X 10 were commonly used in the 1920's ) is simpler and cheaper and the post processing options are comparable. Imagine how the quality of film and film processing/digitising would have been improved with modern scientific knowledge if the R&D had been spent there and not on sensors.

1 upvote
Jefbak
By Jefbak (3 months ago)

I am also curious about the zoom range, but also how it would crop compared to a pocket camera with a larger zoom range like the Olympus Stylus 1 (which has a 10x zoom but smaller sensor). If I could crop the sony image and end up with the same relative quality, then I could make do without more zoom from it.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (3 weeks ago)

multiply the equiv. focal length by the sqrt pixel count and you will get an idea about the reach (lens resolution and image quality should also be considered but let's keep it simple at first, from data in specs).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
clburton2
By clburton2 (3 months ago)

Hello, this new Sony DSC-RX100 II has everything I believe I want in a point and shoot camera including a larger sensor except for the zoom range. Is there any chance a longer zoom range is coming? Why doesn't anyone offer this camera with greater zoom? Is my expectation unrealistic?

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
lysiajoy
By lysiajoy (3 months ago)

I agree!

0 upvotes
braisim
By braisim (3 months ago)

RX10 offers the same sensor in a super zoom camera.

0 upvotes
clburton2
By clburton2 (3 months ago)

yes, I learned of the rx10 recently. I do like it, but its also $1300 dollars. if they could put that zoom on the rx100m2, that would be a winner. yes, I know I ask a lot apparently. :)

0 upvotes
Petak
By Petak (1 month ago)

I would like them to put the rx10's zoom (just brighter) on rx100, keep the size, increase battery life and lower the price and while they are at it - put an apsc sensor inside. How about that :-)))

1 upvote
Antonio Brito
By Antonio Brito (3 months ago)

I was about to buy the Nikon P7800, but after I saw the "enthusiastic compact camera 2013 roundup" I got completely in doubt in face of the ten cameras listed (mainly between the Nikon and the Olympus Stylus 1).
I use camara most for outdoor pictures, nature and landscapes.
What attracts me most:
1 - image quality
2 - the wide and zoom lenths
3 - the versatility in low or bright light (and night photos)
4 - the apperture time
5 - the quick and friendly controls.

Would someone please help me to make a good choice? britoalmg@gmailcom
P.S.: sorry for my english, I am not native speaker.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
DarrynM
By DarrynM (3 months ago)

I still love my G15 for on the go photos...beats taking the big SLRs I have :)

0 upvotes
zenpaul
By zenpaul (3 months ago)

I'm happy with my Fuji X20 which I bought mid-2013. Bit of a steep learning curve but I'm almost there.
I hope that I'll see that it's not so much the camera but the photog's eye that makes a good photo.
I'm using Lightroom and Photomax Pro and enjoying the results.

Happy New Year to all.

Paul

0 upvotes
CeluiLa
By CeluiLa (3 months ago)

Speaking only of what I know, the Olympus Stylus 1 has a filter thread. If you do want to fit a filter you lose the automatic lens cap, but a normal lens cap on a retainer line is not exactly abominable.

If ever you have to be the sober driver at a lousy, boring New Year's bash, take your tablet... a Happy New Year to all, especially the sober drivers.

1 upvote
jira
By jira (4 months ago)

Which of these cameras has a filter thread?
I think polarizer is a must in many situations.

1 upvote
Ian.O
By Ian.O (2 months ago)

The Nikon P7800 has a filter thread, I deleted the lens cap and replaced it with a UV filter and swap to polarising when the occasion arrives.
For those other queries: I am happy with the P7800 for the combination of electronic viewfinder PLUS the articulated viewfinder which is a deal-breaker for me.
The controls get a bit obtuse at times, I've had a succession of Canons and Panasonics over the years, but I'm getting used to its quaint ways.

1 upvote
KZMike
By KZMike (4 months ago)

Don't limit yourself to this list. Over the years, I've come to know that the newest is NOT always the best, buying a G9 about a year ago and finding it Excellent for the task as a case in point for my self. Also finding a Canon 40D and Nikon D300 for some specific projects recently.

If 'pocket size' is not a requirement you may find even better choices, the Canon GX1 or Panasonic FZ70 as just two options that may engage for your needs.

I've ALWAYs been able to find gently used cameras and lenses very well suited and up to the tasks at 'efficient' prices. E-Bay and Craigslist has served me well, as has a few others . . .
DPReview is a good source of info as is many other sites with equipment reviews. . . photo-dot-net is another that I just remembered

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Mich127
By Mich127 (4 months ago)

Hi, new to this site and hoping for some advice! My Canon G9 hasn't survived its last drop! It was a well used camera which is going to be missed. Now I need to get a new camera and the choice is endless... I'm not up with the terminology but I know what I want from my next camera

Would like:
Slightly longer zoom than the G9 ( but not massive)
The ability to take portraits (people or wildlife) with a blurred background - I understand this has to do with depth of field but that's about it,
A built in ND filter would be good ( would this help against the 'white sky' problem?

Not interested in :
WIFI
GPS
Video
Printing large size

I've posted in this section as I am interested in this group of enthusiast compact - would any of them offer what I'm after? Also really like the external dials and build quality of the G9 - want to avoid touchscreen interface if poss but willing to compromise.

Any advice much appreciated

0 upvotes
KZMike
By KZMike (4 months ago)

Don't limit yourself to this list. Over the years, I've come to know that the newest is NOT always the best, buying a G9 about a year ago and finding it Excellent for the task as a case in point for my self. Also finding a Canon 40D and Nikon D300 for some specific projects recently.

If 'pocket size' is not a requirement you may find even better choices, the Canon GX1 or Panasonic FZ70 as just two options that you might engage for your needs.

I've ALWAYs been able to find gently used cameras and lenses very well suited and up to the tasks at 'efficient' prices. E-Bay and Craigslist has served me well, as has a few others . . .
DPReview is a good source of info as is many other sites with equipment reviews. . . photo-dot-net is another that I just remembered

opps first post in wrong 'spot'

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
1 upvote
awsin
By awsin (3 months ago)

I have recently bought a Nikon P7800 after my 2 second hand Canon Pro 1 got dead. It got 28-200mm zoom, f/2-4, built in ND. swivel screen (good for odd angle shooting), Good image quality and capable macro. So I am not missing my Pro 1 any more. However, everyboby crticize it slow write time, but I do not feel it too slow as I use Jpeg entirely.

2 upvotes
avronaut
By avronaut (4 months ago)

"What enthusiast compact camera should I buy?"

If money is no factor:

Sony RX1R

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
1 upvote
TheNomadWay
By TheNomadWay (4 months ago)

Loads of people say that the small interchangeable lens cameras mean compacts are losing relevance...I think these offer loads of benefits. Still some of the basics are missing on most of them. I still lean towards the P7800...
http://www.thenomadway.com/best-travel-camera.php

4 upvotes
Geren W Mortensen Jr
By Geren W Mortensen Jr (4 months ago)

I have the Fujifilm X10 (predecessor to the X20), and I absolutely love it! It offers a lot more than my other compacts (I have two), and I enjoy using it more than my DSLR. If they made an equivalent with an APS-C-sized sensor, I'd buy it in a New York minute! Yes, I'm aware of the X100s and the X-Pro1, but there's not an equivalent lens available ... yet.

0 upvotes
sbansban
By sbansban (4 months ago)

Nikon Coolpix A and Ricoh GR are two pocketable cameras with APS-C sensors.

0 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (1 week ago)

yet excluded from this list for whatever reason since the RX10 is still here

0 upvotes
Tony0211
By Tony0211 (4 months ago)

How do any of these manufacturers put a $500 plus price tag on those offered without viewfinders?

0 upvotes
vladimir314
By vladimir314 (4 months ago)

I myself don't use viewfinder, therefore I would change your question in the following way: " ... on those offered without articulated display?" Since I cannot imagine work without it. Have nice days. :-)

5 upvotes
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (5 months ago)

I have been around advanced technology and been a part-time pro photographer for a bunch of years shooting nature, travel, events and basic product. In addition to my pro-level gear, I have been carrying a compact camera almost everywhere I go. I recently replaced my Canon G12 with a Nikon P7800. With a UHS-1 card, I have been shooting landscapes, people and simple studio photography with these conclusions. Composing with an LCD is not OK to me. You cannot see any meaningful details, are distracted by the surroundings, and the shooting stance is very unstable. The EVF of the P7800 is not perfect but is still a great improvement over no viewfinder or the optical versions of the Canon G's. The range of the zoom is unique in this category and the lens is quite bright. Raw + jpeg write speed is about 1.5sec/frame, 0.5 sec/frame slower that dpreview’s favorite camera and not an issue for me. Operations are quick once you learnt them. I truly believe that this camera is getting a bad rap.

8 upvotes
PedroMZ
By PedroMZ (5 months ago)

could not agree more about the lack of viewfinders and trying to photograph with the rear screen---more like a shot in the dark. Although the Fuji OVF only covers about 82% of the field of view, it is bright and has that all important info. I looked at the Nikon, who are to be congratulated for including an EVF but this has made it very expensive in the UK

1 upvote
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (5 months ago)

Too bad, the more I use mine the more I like it. It really pays to go through the manual and learn settings and operations because once you have done it it's a lot of fun to make the camera jump through hoops. I am getting some remarkable pics in tough light conditions. With the camera's IQ and resolution, I have no trouble making truly good 16x24" pics (on art paper with the Epson 3800). I am not trying to put down the other camera models which are all great (and everyone has the right to decide which one is best for them), just giving Caesar (the P7800) what belongs to him.

1 upvote
Nerkdergler
By Nerkdergler (5 months ago)

The viewfinder vs LCD issue is largely a preference thing. There are pros and cons of composing each way, and it comes down to what you personally prefer and are used to. I shoot both ways and find it's worthwhile occasionally challenging myself to see whether I've been constructing 'reasons' to defend what is essentially a habit.

1 upvote
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (5 months ago)

No it is not. I am all for letting people choose what they like and if at least sometime you prefer composing with the LCD, you are not going to get an argument from me. I do it too in some situations, specifically when I cannot put my eye to the viewfinder (i.e. ground-level closeups, overhead shooting, etc.) Two issues are irrefutable though. Firstly, the view offered by a pentaprim, pentamirror or EV finder is more detailed and, consequently, superior for precise composition than the one offered by a typical 3" LCD (my 7" studio monitor is a whole different bowl of wax, also because subjects stay still). Secondly, shooting with a weight at the end of your extended arms is mush more unstable than pressing the camera to your face. These are scientific facts, not personal preferences.

2 upvotes
JamesVo
By JamesVo (4 months ago)

I recently had to start wearing glasses but I hate them. Since I am long sighted I can see my subjects and look through a EVF/OVF without them - big bonus. The point about composing with the LCD forcing you hold the camera away from your body instead of bracing it is valid for poor light and longer focal lengths when shutter speeds will be slower. The lack of VF on the P7700 made me pass it by but I will have a look at the P7800

0 upvotes
Antonio Brito
By Antonio Brito (3 months ago)

Your post has helped me a lot. If you rave time, please read my post above. I was about to buy the P7800, but gor in doubt after a read the negative coments on it...

0 upvotes
lhkjacky
By lhkjacky (5 months ago)

The best enthusiast compacts which can make me leave the DSLR should be the Ricoh GR. :p

Its IQ can on par with any APSC size DSLR.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
PedroMZ
By PedroMZ (5 months ago)

Although I do not own one I am surprised that the Fuji X20 does not stand higher in your recommendations.Its IQ is a least a stop better than all the others with the exception of the Sony (and not that far behind that ) and offers a brighter OVF than the Canon and more importantly gives settings info . DPreview like so many other review sites ,appear to attach little importance to viewfinders. Not all your audience is 18yrs old.

4 upvotes
psn
By psn (5 months ago)

Unengaging shooting experience... care to explain that one?

0 upvotes
steve ohlhaber
By steve ohlhaber (5 months ago)

There is no excuse for leaving the Canon G1X out of this bunch. Its possibly the best fixed lens still image camera out there and its priced right at the sony rx. It can crush just about every other fixed lens camera due to the massive sensor it has. That camera and the Sony RX are the only ones I really think about leaving the SLR behind for and its not even on the list??? This list would make more sense without the sony rx in there due to its price.

1 upvote
Jim
By Jim (4 months ago)

Absolutely agree. Plus G1X can be had for about $455 USD. It's amazing how the G1X gets overlooked so consistently.

0 upvotes
miketala
By miketala (5 months ago)

Don't quite understand why something like the Panasonic GM1 isn't on this list.

It's interchangeable, but so what? With the kit lens it's still more compact, I believe, than some of the cameras in this list. It's too compromised to get mention in a normal mirrorless category. This is where it belongs. One simply gets the added bonus of being able to put on other lenses with it - including some small bright primes.

1 upvote
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (5 months ago)

This round up won't cut it for the enthusiast who wants the 'best possible camera' in a small package. The Nikon A and the Ricoh GR are vastly superior to everything on that list.

3 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (5 months ago)

A good overview but we all have our favourites. I really want to replace my G9 because it is so old but every time I use it I don't see the reason why. It really is a terrific camera and proves to me that 1,7 inch is more than big enough to make great photos.

1 upvote
GeraldW
By GeraldW (5 months ago)

My thoughts exactly. From my tests, the G9 (and G7) has the sharpest lens of all the G series. Resolution equals the G10 in spite of the 10's higher pixel count; but the contrast is higher on the G9. I'm also hanging onto an S90 and a Pro 1.

0 upvotes
LucasO
By LucasO (5 months ago)

I have the same problem with my Panasonic LX3. I can't bring myself to replace it because the images are great and it feels nice in my hands to use. I rented a Sony RX100 II last week for a job, hoping that the hype would be fulfilled. I probably had too high of expectations because after taking test shots I just left it in my bag and stuck with my MFT equipment for the job. The images were far from acceptable for paying work, and I totally understood the reviewers comments about using it being unengaging.

But unless I drop my LX3 again or an RX100 falls from the sky into my lap, I think I'll stick to my LX3 a bit longer.

0 upvotes
Mt Rod
By Mt Rod (3 months ago)

I had the same feelings about my LX-3, until it was taken by a burglar last February. I ended up replacing it with the LX-7 which feels the same in my hand, but in my opinion does an even better job.
Don't try one unless you want to give up your LX-3.

0 upvotes
Treeshade
By Treeshade (5 months ago)

To help lazy readers:

By R Butler:
The GR, X100S, Coolpix A, Sigma DPMs and possibly the Canon G1X would fall into a more specialist class, but we're probably not going to have a chance to cover those, this time 'round.

By Andy Westlake:
We've reviewed most of those cameras in detail. The only ones missing are the Sigma DP Merrills (which we struggle to recommend for most users, as they're highly reliant on Sigma Photo Pro for Raw conversion, which can produce great output but is painfully slow and clunky), and the Leica X2, which is pretty much eclipsed by the X100S.

If you're buying in this class, I'd say the choice looks pretty simple. Pick whether you want a 35mm-equiv or 28mm-equiv lens. If 28mm, buy the GR, unless you have Nikon accessories which you can (and will) use with the Coolpix A. If 35mm, buy the X100S, unless you have a really good reason to pick the RX1.

1 upvote
kff
By kff (5 months ago)

Sigma DP Merrills can be a good change for film photographers ... :)
In the image quality is a first of ... maybe a new Ricoh GXR will come ... with built wi-fi, GPS and Android in the range APS-C to MF or it will make Google with RAW format in the Android:)

Or some new accesories for Wacom: http://cintiqcompanion.wacom.com/en/

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
kff
By kff (5 months ago)

Sony's additional cameras for smartphones will have follower with APS-C ... why not Google with ... ?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
smorti
By smorti (5 months ago)

So am I right in thinking that the Ricoh GR, Nikon A, Sigma DPMs, Fujifilm X100S, Sony RX1/R etc. aren't going to get a roundup - despite being clearly a separate and self-contained class apart from the others, targeting a user-type which clearly has a large presence on this site, are wildly innovative in terms of offering significant gains in image quality which rival or even supersede DSLRs, and are truly portable? It's not like they are even niche models anymore - they are well into the mainstream as far as sales go.

1 upvote
kadardr
By kadardr (5 months ago)

Nikon A? Ricoh GR?

0 upvotes
kff
By kff (5 months ago)

Yes, that are SUPERB compact cameras ...
but someone have to make zoom by going :)

0 upvotes
Czechster
By Czechster (5 months ago)

The 7800 gives me the applity to add a 40.5 filter. Can you do that with your $800 Sony RX100II?

1 upvote
RPJG
By RPJG (5 months ago)

Stop the press! Camera A has a function Camera B doesn't have, THEREFORE IT MUST WIN!!

7 upvotes
jimkh
By jimkh (5 months ago)

I don't understand this vague putdown of the RX100 and the RX100II with the "unengaging experience" tag. While this is obviously a very personal reaction by the reviewer it cries out for a more detailed explanation. What is "unengaging" and how do other cameras reflect engagement?

Jimkh

1 upvote
jkoch2
By jkoch2 (5 months ago)

The RX100 and RX100ii cost plenty. One could by two LX7's for the price of either. That's not a quaint personal bias, but a cold fact. If you think, the RX100 is more than twice the "value" of other cameras in the group, that is pretty hard to prove, and the advocate will probably resort to some very unengaging personal reaction.

3 upvotes
alexzn
By alexzn (5 months ago)

I agree. If you are after engaging shooting experience you will use a bigger camera. Rx100 is all about fitting in the pocket and bringing back the best image. The only downside is the price. Knocking it because the wheel does not click is malarkey. Rx100 crushed it's class when it was released. It still crushes every other camera in the segment. Rx100II is supposedly even better.

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (5 months ago)

at 28mm equiv., LX7 is about f/7.3 equiv. (proportional)
and it's f/4.8 for RX100, more than one stop difference.

LX7 got a 1/1.7" sensor but it only uses a portion of it (about 84% of other 1/1.7" cameras).

0 upvotes
skyrunr
By skyrunr (5 months ago)

I have an RX100. Just try and turn the flash on and off between a few photos, and you'll see how unengaging it is. The shutter and power buttons are way too sensitive. There's no feel to the pre-focus. The camera strap mount blocks the usb (only 2.0) door which is required to charge the battery.

Pictures our of this camera are REALLY nice when you can hold it still enough. Without some protective grippy stickers on it you will drop it a lot. I had dust issues with mine as well which took two trips to Sony to resolve.

You also can't preview videos and images without changing between respective folders.

1 upvote
Alashi
By Alashi (5 months ago)

I got the RX100 right after they came out--was on a wait list. I've carried it on my belt ever since. The IQ is good enough, so it works for me. What I really like about it is the speed by which I can take follow-up shots. I just keep pressing the release, and it keeps capturing for as long as I continue. People think I've taken no shots or 1 shot, but I've already captured 15! It's sort of 'candid' in that respect, and I get a great selection of images. For quality, I use my Fuji x100s; it is superb. Beats my all my Canons and lenses for IQ. And, it has a viewfinder--the one thing I don't have with my Sony. But, that's the price I paid for compactness. I used to carry my Canon S90, S95 and S100 in earlier days, and they proved pretty darn good also. (I still use my Pro1 too :-))

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Dellis12
By Dellis12 (4 months ago)

Best street camera ever, for the reasons above. All the others either require a burst or they write to the card after each shot. The RX100 IQ is so close to DSLR that the difference isn't worth the weight challenge unless you're making huge prints. Not to mention the fact that it's stealthy--the minute you raise any camera to your face in street shooting, everyone disappears...

0 upvotes
Mr Justice Cocklecarrot
By Mr Justice Cocklecarrot (5 months ago)

Curious that the Panasonic LF1 is overlooked.
It's an LX7 with a longer but slower lens, but with a EVF.
And it has the same 1/1.7 sensor.

Currently top of my Christmas list.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (5 months ago)

This wasn't a pocket camera roundup, smallest one is the RX100 and the rest are mostly not gonna fit into your pant's pocket... They already mentioned the LF1 will be in their advanced pocket cam roundup, along with the likes of the S120, P3300, possibly the RX100 again, etc.

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (5 months ago)

Impulses is precisely right, and we've just published that article:

Click here to read our pocketable compact roundup. I hope you find it useful.

0 upvotes
jimr
By jimr (5 months ago)

LF-1. Wasn't overlooked. See the pocketable comparative test.
It was not loved....nor liked...

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
1 upvote
gskolenda
By gskolenda (2 weeks ago)

I 'll just wait till next year and there will be used ones on the market for half the price, I'm not in need but would love to have one., In due time!

0 upvotes
Total comments: 216
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