Lensbaby Edge 80 Quick Review

Lensbaby Edge 80 practical examples

On this page, I'm going to show a few practical examples of the kind of imagery you can get out of the Edge 80. In all cases I used it in the Composer Pro body on a Canon EOS 600D. The 'look' obtained from the Edge 80 lends itself to further post-processing to get the most impact out of the images, and correspondingly these have all been worked-up in Photoshop, with relatively simple manipulations for colour and contrast. As usual, original out-of-camera JPEGs are available in our samples gallery.

Portraits

The Edge 80's focal length means it's well suited to portraiture, both on APS-C cameras (on which it offers the equivalent of a 120mm lens on Nikon, Pentax and Sony cameras, and 130mm on Canon). It allows you either to focus specifically on an individual within a crowd, or narrow the emphasis of the image to your subject's eyes, blurring away anything else.

In this shot - a candid captured on London's underground - I titled the lens diagonally up and to the left, to keep the subject's eyes in focus but blur the rest of the frame. It was shot at F2.8 and ISO 3200 which means that the original is low contrast and somewhat noisy, so I've enhanced the contrast then sharpened to accentuate the grain, giving a result not dissimilar to high-speed mono film. Finally it's slightly cropped.

Miniature effect

Tilting the lens can also give the currently-fashionable 'fake miniature' effect, but with a far greater degree of creative control than offered by most in-camera filters. You can change the angle, width and position of the in-focus region of the image in a fashion that's simply not otherwise possible. The very nature of the Lensbaby's 'freeform' approach to lens movements means, however, that it's all a bit more hit-and-miss compared to a conventional tilt lens - you can't place the in-focus region at a precisely-defined angle across the frame - but that's all part of the charm.

Here the miniature effect emphasizes the size of the two small children, using upward tilt to place a slice of focus horizontally across the frame. In this image I've added vignetting to darken the corners, and slightly tweaked saturation to enhance the pink and green coats.

Selective Focus

Tilting can also be used for selective focus effects, somewhat akin to existing Lensbabies but with a more conventional look to the out-of-focus regions. This can be useful when you want to blur away objects in the same plane as the main subject which would usually be rendered equally sharp.

Not all tilt effects have to be visually extreme. In this shot, the yellow flowers to the right were in the same plane as the rose, and would normally be equally sharp. A slight tilt to the left allowed me to blur them away and make them less distracting. The image is finished-off by a small contrast boost, and the addition of a little vignetting to darken the edges.

With a tilt lens, you can also play with selective focus in ways that are simply impossible with conventional optics. You can even place the focus plane running diagonally through your subject so that objects behind each other are equally in focus.

An extreme leftwards tilt has allowed me to render the cakes at the front front and right equally sharp, while blurring the one on the left: an effect that's difficult to replicate any other way. This image has been enhanced by blowing the background to pure white, and tweaking the contrast and saturation in Photoshop. 

Using tilt to increase depth of field

The Edge 80 can also, at a pinch, be used for a more-conventional application of tilt lenses: to increase depth of field, for example in product photography. The advantage over simply stopping the lens down is that you can work at more favourable apertures that are unaffected by diffraction softening. The lack of precise control over lens movements means that this is a rather hit-and-miss process, but with patience good results can be obtained.

Using a slight tilt to the left allowed me to get the whole of the front of this camera in good focus, while only using a relatively modest aperture (F8). With a conventional macro lens I'd have had to stop down to at least F16 to get both strap lugs sharp, which would cause diffraction-related softening. 

Abstracts

If, like me, you enjoy shooting entirely abstract images, the Edge 80 can bring an extra dimension by adding the ability to selectively blur areas of the frame. This can be used to selectively blur-away parts of the image that may distract from the overall composition, or simply to add a new element to the image.

The impact of this shot comes from mainly its colour palette and bold graphical shapes, with tilt used to add an additional compositional element - the diagonal region of sharp focus. This is obtained by tilting the lens upwards and to the right.

Conclusion

Lensbaby's lenses have until now been distinctly niche products - their emphasis on optical imperfection placing them very much counter to the mainstream in a digital photography world striving for ever more pixels and detail. The Edge 80, however, may well appeal to a broader spectrum of photographers, as it offers something rather interesting that SLR users simply haven't had until now - a telephoto tilt lens that doesn't cost a fortune. Of course existing Lensbaby users should find it offers a useful new string to their bow.

Naturally it's still not really cheap, in the way the company's original products were - the lens alone is likely to set you back around $300, and that's without a body unit to use it in. This may seem like a lot of money to pay for something so unconventional, but it does come with plenty of creative possibilities. Crucially, many photographers may well find its less-idiosyncratic imaging more appealing - and more generally useful - than existing Lensbaby lenses.

Perhaps the biggest question is why you would use the Edge 80 rather than in-camera 'Miniature' filters or post-process manipulation in Photoshop, and the answer to that is threefold. It offers much more flexibility than typical in-camera effects filters, which are commonly restricted to a sharp zone of fixed width across the center of the frame that often doesn't suit the subject. In contrast, with the Edge 80 you can vary the angle and width of the sharp region almost infinitely. Compared to post-processing after the event, it allows you to compose your image specifically with the effect of tilt in mind, as it's visible in the viewfinder as you go along. Producing the effect optically also offers gradual transitions from sharp to out-of-focus regions in a natural-looking and attractive fashion that's often difficult, if not impossible to replicate in post-processing.

Overall, I've enjoyed using the Edge 80 - it makes a refreshing change from 'conventional' photography, and offers a genuinely interesting creative option that's suitable for a range of subjects. Purely personally, it's my favourite of the company's lenses yet by quite some distance. I'm not going to pretend that it will be ideal for everybody, but if you're interested in adding something a little different to your images then it's well worth a try.  

Sample images

There are 19 images in the samples gallery. Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review), we do so in good faith, please don't abuse it.

Unless otherwise noted images taken with no particular settings at full resolution. Because our review images are now hosted on the 'galleries' section of dpreview.com, you can enjoy all of the new galleries functionality when browsing these samples. 

The images in this gallery are out-of-camera JPEGs with no post-processing, and include full-size versions of the exampes shown above.

Lensbaby Edge 80 Review Samples - Published 14th February 2012

Comments

Total comments: 75
Jose A. Pacheco
By Jose A. Pacheco (2 months ago)

This article is more informative than Lensbabies website in terms of what we can do with this lens. I foresee it will be in my bag soon.

0 upvotes
SarinaGito
By SarinaGito (10 months ago)

I'm interested in purchasing the edge 80. but i can find no info on if this is compatible with a 5D Canon Mark ii and Mark iii

any one got any tips? thanks. if not responding here.. u can contact me via contact form on my website . thanks www.sarinagito.com

0 upvotes
bobcooley
By bobcooley (10 months ago)

Its is compatible with all systems. It requires the composer pro housing which attaches to your camera, but they make this in almost all mounts.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 25, 2012)

If you are in the UK it makes sense to order it from the states instead. Even with all applicable taxes and postage you should still save around £50 in the worst case scenario.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 23, 2012)

UK price confirmed at £300, which is equivalent to $475.

UK customers are expected to pay £110 or $175 more than US customers.

Boo Hiss Lensbaby! Very greedy.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 22, 2012)

Lensbaby and Intro2020 (UK importer) have so far been unable to confirm the UK selling price.

However Morris Photo have it listed on their site at £299 (eqiv. to $475 dollars)

http://www.morrisphoto.co.uk/ProductDetails~man~Lensbaby~productID~9797~categoryid~270.html

If you were starting from scratch then you would need a composer -ranges from £167 to £365 ($265 - $580)- depending on whether or you go for the basic body and double glass lens or pro body with sweet 35 optic.

In the UK if you want to get the Edge 80 kit your pocket will be between £468 & £664 lighter ($740 & $1050)

Even if you already have a composer kit you're still paying 60% more for the optic in the UK than you would in the states.

I'm a lensbaby fan. I had the original, the 2.0, now have the composer and I think they are great. The extreme cost of the new optic and the disparity between US and UK prices really really put me off the product and the brand.

Would any of my US friends pay $1050 for this optic?

0 upvotes
Norman L. Allen
By Norman L. Allen (Feb 17, 2012)

I am definitely getting one! I have one of the original Lensbabies, and even though I didn't use it much, I loved the times when I did.

0 upvotes
tr6me
By tr6me (Feb 16, 2012)

This Lensbaby Edge 80 is awesome! Love the creative possibilities! The tilt shot of the Olympus 35 SP is fantastic! Have to make similar product shots occasionally - this may be the way to go! The Lensbaby 'sweetspot' was never my thing... I'll order a Composer (pro)/Edge 80 asap.

0 upvotes
kdaphoto
By kdaphoto (Feb 15, 2012)

I picked mine up yesterday. It's great fun and will give me another element of creativity in the field. For me, being able to compose a shot using tilt in the field is an advantage. And since it's part of a system, the cost is incremental. Plus, the 12 curved blades create a luscious bokeh.

0 upvotes
Jonne Ollakka
By Jonne Ollakka (Feb 15, 2012)

I've had a setup like this for years now. Composer with a Schneider-Kreuznach 80/2.8 enlarger lens. It's nice to see Lensbaby offering a true tilt-option without the sweet spot (it always looked like Photoshop radial blur anyway).

0 upvotes
pjcostanza
By pjcostanza (Feb 15, 2012)

I purchased a Sweet 35 some time ago and I returned it. It was okay..., but for the same money I could get a like-new/used Nikkor 50mm AF-S f1.4 and opted to do just that.
The new Edge 80 has me intrigued again.., but after contacting Lensbaby, you cannot buy this optic with the required body attachment, so you HAVE to buy a composer or composer pro too. Which really makes this $300 lens a $550-$700 investment.
Again, as many have pointed out.., this is Capitalism at it's finest, anyone that has owned one knows that the materials and technology (or lack thereof) just simply do not justify this high cost.., yet I am still intrigued and I'm sure thats exactly what they're banking on. - ;o)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
DAnonymous1
By DAnonymous1 (Feb 16, 2012)

Their customer service told me otherwise. They said the Composer Pro together with the Edge 80 is $520, but only by phone. The Composer Pro with Sweet 35 is $400 online. The Sweet 35 costs $180, and the Edge 80 costs $300. So they don't even charge anything extra for customizing the package, just the exact price difference for the optic.

0 upvotes
Rupert Bottomsworth
By Rupert Bottomsworth (Feb 15, 2012)

I'm curious as to who buys lens baby products, because all I've seen from them are cheap gimmicks that have no photographic value at all. These kinds of gimmicky effects can be done in photoshop anyway, so why would you waste your money buying this junk?

3 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 15, 2012)

I use my DSLR for video and these effects would not be easy to replicate in the likes of After Effects or motion, a single frame's fine, big artefacts occur when trying to fake these type of effects in post.

There are also those who want to shoot rather than sit at a PC (I don't mind, but some do) if your client is sitting over your shoulder it's good to show them the effect in camera, live as the shoot takes place.

I can see why these products aren't for everybody, as a matter of taste or whatever, but I'm glad the company are there, doing -to my mind- interesting things.

The goodwill kind of runs out when it comes to cost though. I've tried lensbaby and intro2020 (uk importer) and have yet to receive an answer to the issue of UK price.

By the time you add up the cost of composer mount (bought only with another lens - ranges between £170-£350 depending on spec) and this optic it becomes very very expensive for a fun lens.

You would need to use it a lot for it to be good value!

6 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 15, 2012)

If you think of Lensbabies like a mini Panavision Hylens system they do suddenly become quite good value, if you have the application for a hylens that is....

0 upvotes
jpfaria
By jpfaria (Feb 15, 2012)

Repost: Add the "online" possibilities! I'm not a lensbaby user but I understand that, when you post an image it is just that: you have to work with "that" image; when getting the effect "online" while shooting you can modify the scene so it works better with the desired effect.

0 upvotes
zevobh
By zevobh (Feb 15, 2012)

come on. are you gonna say that a tilt shift lens is a gimmick?!

2 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 15, 2012)

No, it is gimmicky that you are forced into buying a double glass or sweet 35 optic that you might not want in order to able to use the edge 80. Add that to the 1.5x more that we in the uk will also have to pay on top the us price and the concept wears thin.

And it is not a SHIFT lens. It tilts. It rotates. It does not shift.

0 upvotes
kdaphoto
By kdaphoto (Feb 15, 2012)

It's part of a SYSTEM, so if you bought into the system then the cost is incremental. Also, try calling Lensbaby about buying a Composer or Composer Pro without the optics. I did that with the Scout. I bought the fisheye before they made the Scout mount. I called and they sold me the Scout mount without optics. They may do the same for one of the Composers.

0 upvotes
DAnonymous1
By DAnonymous1 (Feb 16, 2012)

Lensbaby lets you make custom orders of a lens body and optic if you call them. They will sell you the Composer Pro with the Edge 80 for $520 (and other lens body combinations as well probably), instead of a lens body with the packaged optic and then the Edge 80 itself as well. So all they do is charge you the extra cost of the Edge 80 over the prepackaged optic, in this example, the Sweet Optic, which is a $120 difference (Sweet 35 is $180, Edge 80 is $300).

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ericimbs
By ericimbs (Feb 20, 2012)

pretty strong statements bottomsworth. when you used and assessed it, what were the main things about it that motivated your comments?

0 upvotes
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Feb 15, 2012)

Maybe I've missed something but isn't the lens body made of plastic? No wonder it is so cheap then.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
jacketpotato
By jacketpotato (Feb 15, 2012)

Olympus Trip photo reminded me small sensor cams are super at getting everything in focus & sharp.
Digilux2 (LC1) i had was brill for product shots.

0 upvotes
Jon Stern
By Jon Stern (Feb 15, 2012)

I didn't think I wanted this until I saw the shot of the Olympus Trip (sans David Bailey).

Thanks for reminding me that I occasionally have a use for this type of TS photography, even if it tend to be for photographing things at work.

No thanks for draining another $300 + tax + shipping from my bank account.

1 upvote
Lng0004
By Lng0004 (Feb 15, 2012)

What's up with all these dumb tech reporters calling a tilt lens "tilt-shift"? Do they even know what the "shift" in tilt-shift is?

5 upvotes
jvkelley
By jvkelley (Feb 15, 2012)

Dislike

0 upvotes
Lng0004
By Lng0004 (Feb 16, 2012)

That makes no sense. Dislike my questions? Dislike the dumb tech reporters?

Facebook have made everybody dumb and dumber.

2 upvotes
jvkelley
By jvkelley (Feb 16, 2012)

Mr. Westlake made many references in his article to this lens tilting, but not a single reference to it shifting. You decided to call him a "dumb tech reporter" anyway. That is the part that I disliked.

1 upvote
klopus
By klopus (Feb 15, 2012)

Anything that Lensbaby does can be easily and totally done much cheaper in post and with better quality if you use decent ordinary lens. And you don't have to toil manually in PS (though it isn't hard). There are many plugins that can simulate free form tilt/shift and selective focus. Heck, on iPhone and Android there are hordes of apps doing same thing.

The only Lensbaby advantage non reproduceable in post I see is to use movements to level architectural perspective which is main application of the classical T/S lens. Not sure if this even can be done reliably with Lensbabies since they lack precise controls and sharp end-to-end optics.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
blue camera
By blue camera (Feb 15, 2012)

You're missing the point: the fun aspect of shooting with a Lensbaby in real life, in real time. I use an (older) Lensbaby 2.0, which is a pre-optic swap model similar to the current Muse. It's when you are looking at the world while bending the lens and reacting in the moment to what you experience, that leads you to make the photos you do. You can do lots of great things in post-, and pre-visualize what you will do later while shooting, but it is a different experience. Post is just that, post. Now is now.
With the 2.0, you can also force it into a slight shift position with a strong hand, as there is nthing but air behind the lens, unlike the housing employed in the newer optic swap style.

10 upvotes
goldstar
By goldstar (Feb 15, 2012)

Well spoken!

2 upvotes
RunStrom
By RunStrom (Feb 15, 2012)

The lens baby will run rings around anything that you Photoshop or attempt in post production. WHY? Simply because it has a bit of magic attached to it. All your photo shopping is planned and will be as boring as you are. Lens Baby will have bokeh or softening that your eye didn’t see and most important a look that is not planned but spontaneous. Using this purely manual lens will also increase your skills. So be a devil – go out and try one – have some fun instead of sitting behind a computer screen doing endless masks and blurring.

8 upvotes
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Feb 15, 2012)

Not true. Tilt for "extending DOF" cannot be replaced with editing a single frame and focus stacking is certainly not 'easy'.

2 upvotes
jpfaria
By jpfaria (Feb 15, 2012)

Add the "online" possibilities! I'm not a lensbaby user but I understand that, when you post an image it is just that: you have to work with "that" image; when getting the effect "online" while shooting you can modify the scene so it works better with the desired effect. (I repeated this answer in another post.)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Mar 10, 2012)

Spoken like someone who have never used a Lensbaby product. Image processing to make an approximate simulated effect of something is not as good as the effect itself, the same way artificial guacamole-flavored dip is not guacamole.

Maybe you should give up photography and do everything in software - after all, a digital image is just a bunch of pixels, and computers can generate those for you...

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Feb 14, 2012)

A very welcome product!

The overpriced TS lenses of the other major brands just lost their value overnight...

Good.

2 upvotes
JamieTux
By JamieTux (Feb 15, 2012)

No they didn't, the Nikon ones for example are very sharp, even wide open, they give you much more control over tilt (and they give you shift, which is a completely different type of movement) and they have electronic aperture control so you don't have to compose stopped down...

Try taking a landscape with the whole view in focus or architecture with straight buildings then tell us that this replaces TS lenses.

4 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 14, 2012)

I really like the image of the woman in the London Underground. It has a classic look, with an really interesting introspective pose by the model. Well done image, interesting lens.

3 upvotes
Jon Stern
By Jon Stern (Feb 14, 2012)

What about on a full frame body?

For the Sweet 35 review you looked at both. As a 5D Mark II owner I'd want to know how it performs without the APS-C crop.

0 upvotes
SiberianOne
By SiberianOne (Feb 15, 2012)

I have lensbaby sweet 35 and it works fine with full frame camera.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jon Stern
By Jon Stern (Feb 15, 2012)

I have the Sweet 35 on FF too, but I want to see how this optic fares on FF.

As this can be used to achieve sharp corners, the MTF at the extremes of the field would need to be high enough.

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Feb 14, 2012)

Any price idea?

0 upvotes
kdaphoto
By kdaphoto (Feb 15, 2012)

$300 US

0 upvotes
Doug Frost
By Doug Frost (Feb 14, 2012)

Too bad it's not compatible with their only NEX lens body unit.

2 upvotes
OdzBodkinz
By OdzBodkinz (Feb 14, 2012)

It doesnt need to be compatible. The point of the Tilt Transformer is to be able to add Nikon F Mount lenses to NEX and m4/3 to achieve the same effect.

1 upvote
Klarno
By Klarno (Feb 14, 2012)

It seems to me that combining this lens with the Lensbaby Control Freak might reduce or eliminate all of the "hit and miss process" comments in this review.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
citizenlouie
By citizenlouie (Feb 14, 2012)

It looks like a nice lens. I personally won't buy it, but it's nice for those who love soft, selective focus (the bokeh is very smooth looking! 12 ROUNDED aperture blades, cool!). It's a niche market, so that means not everyone would want it, or can afford it, but there are those who do!

Come on guys, it's Valentine's Day. A little less hate and grumpiness is good for a change.

1 upvote
Zebooka
By Zebooka (Feb 14, 2012)

and then... finally... Lensbaby will invent tilt-shift lens :)

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 14, 2012)

Surely the day cannot be far off when we get shifting sensors instead? Make in camera and workable with lenses with a larger image circle (or FF lenses on a APS-C body)

0 upvotes
MikeFreeze
By MikeFreeze (Feb 14, 2012)

hummm....Pentax already has a shifting sensor in the K-5. The body uses sensor-shift for image stabilization, and Pentax has utilized the moving sensor in some innovative ways. The sensor shifts in 2 ways that I know of (may be others I don't know about); 1.) it shifts to level a slightly unlevel scene, & 2.) using a dedicated GPS unit it can shift to follow stars for astro-photography - now that's cool. Pentax technology is a bit of an unknown to most folks - it's a pleasant surprise to most.

2 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 14, 2012)

As a canon user I can only look at the performance they get out the sony 16Mp sensor and marvel, they even out-do Nikon!

And the K-01 & pancake combo looks like the 'almost' CSC camera that Canon users are crying out for..

Interesting company pentax, always have been.

0 upvotes
ffnikclif
By ffnikclif (Feb 14, 2012)

A niche lens, for a niche camera(Pentax).

0 upvotes
kdaphoto
By kdaphoto (Feb 15, 2012)

@ffnikclif, except that it can be used on Nikon and Canon.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 14, 2012)

@Bob Janes

I guess they are constrained by the dimensions of the composer body and the optic swap. It would need to be a much bigger lens to cover the shift movements.

0 upvotes
Bob Janes
By Bob Janes (Feb 14, 2012)

Always good to see a product that is different, but I wonder why they did not try to introduce some shift as well..

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 14, 2012)

Lensbaby is - and has always been - about selective focus. Shift is about perspective control, which is an entirely different concept; classically the correction of converging verticals when using a wideangle lens. Likewise tilt movements on TS lenses have traditionally been used to increase DOF rather than decrease it - precisely the opposite of what Lensbaby is aiming for.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 14, 2012)

Too expensive.

So you buy a composer or a composer pro first? Then the add on lens?

Looks like a great idea, and a great development.

But they've missed a trick.

Few folk own a TS lens, those who do really really need them and will buy the best, not this. The rest will rent when required. Folk wanting the occassional toytown effect are not going to spend this kind of money.

So who will buy it?

Especially in the EU/UK where the price in dollars is usually the price in euros or pounds making these expensive prices 1.6x more expensive.

It's also a little tele for APS_C users wanting a portrait or toytown lens.

As much as I'm taken with this little optic I think my money too is on the arsat.

Too expensive for a fun effect lens.

1 upvote
Thorbard
By Thorbard (Feb 15, 2012)

I'm particularly interested in the "Sweet 35", but there is no way I'll buy the lens at the current price when the same money can get me so much more. That said, its a good price if you're after that kind of tilt lens.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 15, 2012)

At least you can buy the sweet 35 as a kit with composer body (albeit the more expensive composer pro body) if you are buying from scratch you need to buy a composer with double optic, then then the sweet 35 on top of that.

It becomes very expensive.

I would hire a tilt lens, I would maybe even hire a lensbaby with edge 80, would I be able to justify buying one.... hmm hmm hmm.

It depends on them getting the UK price right. I already have a composer.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 15, 2012)

EDIT TO ABOVE!

"if you are buying from scratch you need to buy a composer with double optic, then then the sweet 35 on top of that. "

Should read:

"if you are buying from scratch you need to buy a composer with double optic, then then the edge 80 optic on top of that."

Apologies for typo, to clarify, you can buy a composer with double glass optic fitted or composer pro with double glass optic or sweet 35 optic fitted.

You would require one of the composer or composer pro kits as well as the the edge80 optic, no matter which option it just gets too darned expensive.

0 upvotes
kdaphoto
By kdaphoto (Feb 15, 2012)

It's a lens SYSTEM. So yes, if you haven't bought into the system then it is pricier. But as part of a system it is an incremental expense. I picked this lens up yesterday and have started experimenting with it. It's great fun and offers creativity. I'm looking forward to publishing work with this soon.

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Feb 15, 2012)

And I'm looking forward to trying one, going by us prices the new optic costs more than my entry to the system. That is NOT incremental.

The product looks good, possibly even great. But the price is all wrong. Like the lomo guys, they've gotton greedy.

It might compare well in price next to a ts-e lens, but it isn't a comparable product. My 7d cost more than my sneakers. Is that a valid comparison?

I may yet buy a copy of this, but I'll need to see the uk price. If its the usual dollars to pounds con I am as well getting a used 80mm arsat ts lens.

Comment edited 57 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
roblarosa
By roblarosa (Feb 14, 2012)

Lensbaby = Overpriced crap.

2 upvotes
Zebooka
By Zebooka (Feb 14, 2012)

not really.
If you don't need it - do not think no one uses it.
If you can't use it - the same.

I've heard same words about fullframe, fisheye, tilt-shift, pro cameras and so on...

9 upvotes
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Feb 15, 2012)

Zebooka: you are feeding a troll.

0 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Feb 14, 2012)

I'm more looking forward to a cheap shift lens...
Baby, lets do it!

1 upvote
Mr Fartleberry
By Mr Fartleberry (Feb 14, 2012)

"resolutely pursued its own path"? More like advertised the H out of their product. Should go good with 36MP eh?

0 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Feb 14, 2012)

It would be great if you updated the captions to describe the (approximate) direction and angle of tilt used for each one.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 14, 2012)

Good point: I've expanded the captions to make clearer the direction of tilt. But by the very nature of using a Lensbaby I can't be very precise on the angle.

2 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Feb 14, 2012)

I think that looks really fun to use in a variety of circumstances. Good review. Thanks for taking the time.

0 upvotes
Morgifier
By Morgifier (Feb 14, 2012)

This is a concise but very informative review with great sample shots, thanks!

I guess a lensbaby setup for my Nikon would set me back $600-$700; Are there any older tilt-shift lenses that I could pick up which offer a similar feature set for a lesser price?

Cheers,
Mog

3 upvotes
photonius
By photonius (Feb 14, 2012)

Arax Photex Arsat for NIKON Tilt shift T/S 80 mm F2.8 lens on ebay 370$

0 upvotes
JasonReplica
By JasonReplica (Feb 14, 2012)

Maybe not a cheaper price but you could I've seen a couple of used Nikon 28mm Shift lens for around £450 or $780 dollars. Looking at the purchase price, image quality and resale value, why would you buy the Lensbaby over the true Nikon optic if you wanted a proper shift lens?

2 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 14, 2012)

@JasonReplica - "why would you buy the Lensbaby over the true Nikon optic if you wanted a proper shift lens" - obviously you wouldn't, because the Lensbaby is a tilt lens. You can't replace an 80mm tilt lens with a 28mm shift, or vice versa. They're totally different things.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
Brentliris
By Brentliris (Mar 15, 2012)

I'd be interested in the Edge 80, and the Composer pro, I don't have any lens baby bodies yet, so it does get expensive, but on the other hand the whole system has alot to offer, I'm an experimental type, and I'm sure I'd likely expand the system with time.

Great idea, and after doing more research on the net, I see the Edge 80 is really a well made capable optic. I'm very tempted. I want selective focus, and I'm not big on Photoshop at present so this would be useful to me.

Regards

Brent

Great article !

0 upvotes
Total comments: 75