Ten unique cameras from the dawn of consumer digital photography

When we're using our 36 Megapixel digital SLRs with large LCDs, fast burst modes, and full HD video recording, we often forget how far things have come. Back in the early days of consumer digital cameras, it was a treat to have an LCD or movie recording capability. There were also cameras that have features that, well, seem a bit odd when you look back at them.

As some of you may know, I ran the Digital Camera Resource Page for fifteen years before joining the DPReview team in February 2013.  Over all those years, I've seen virtually every camera introduced, and some have remained in my memory for one reason or another.

Let's journey back in time to revisit some cameras that stood out from the crowd, starting at the beginning of the digital camera revolution. I apologize in advance for the quality of most of the product shots. Don't forget that the cameras taking the product shots weren't great, either! 

Casio QV-10 (1995)

The QV-10 was one of the first consumer digital cameras, following in the footsteps of the Apple QuickTake 100 and 150. It was introduced in 1995, which is three years before Phil Askey created this website, and has features still found on cameras in 2013. It had a fixed focus, rotating F2.0 lens, which was equivalent to 60mm. The rotating lens design would later be copied by virtually every other camera manufacturer over the next ten years. Any why not? It was a great idea. The price in 1995 was around $750, which was considered a bargain at that time.

The QV-10 was the first consumer digital camera, and introduced features still found on cameras today.

Photos were captured by a 1/5" CCD, which produced photos at a gigantic resolution of 320 x 240. The QV-10 had no memory card, instead saving photos (which Casio called 'pages') to its 16Mbit (2MB) of built-in memory. Cameras of this era didn't capture movies.

Photos were composed on a 1.8-inch TFT display with 61,380 dots. A dial on the bottom of the camera could be used to adjust the screen brightness. My, how times have changed. [Photo credit: The Verge]

The QV-10's main exposure mode was aperture priority. If you didn't want to shoot at F2, you could flip a switch and you were at F8. It also offered 'exposure adjustment', which manipulated the shutter speed. The camera had a fixed focus distance, but a switch allowed you to enter macro mode.

If you wanted to take a flash photo, you were out of luck. That feature wouldn't arrive for another three years, on the QV-770. 

When it came time to get your photos off of the camera, you had to use a proprietary cable that connected to your computer's RS-232 port. You can tell how old the QV-10 is by seeing references to 'video printers' in the manual.

If you want a QV-10 for yourself, good luck - I couldn't find any for sale on eBay. If you want to read a review of the camera from that time, head over to Phil Wherry's website.

Ricoh RDC-1 (1996)

The Ricoh RDC-1 has the distinction of being the first digital camera to have a movie mode. Its video recording capabilities are almost laughable in 2013 terms, but back then this was high-end. The RDC-1 could record five second clips at 768 x 480 (30 fps), with sound no less. The 24MB of memory built into the camera would fill up after just four videos. This technology came at a cost: the RDC-1 was priced in the neighborhood of $1500.

The RDC-1 looked somewhat like a 110 film camera. [Photo credit: Mr. Martin] A 2.5" LCD was optional, and attached to the side of the body. [Photo credit: Mr. Martin]

Other details are a little sketchy. The RDC-1 had a 0.38 megapixel CCD and a 3X optical zoom lens, though we were unable to find the focal range (if you know, please leave a comment below). Like most cameras at this time, the RDC-1 used PCMCIA cards for storage. It also supported a wireless remote control, which was less common.

Ricoh would use this design for several years, culminating with the RDC-i700, which let you operate the camera with a stylus. It even supported a modem or 'wireless phone card' for sharing images. You could even adjust the i700's settings from your web browser.

Sony Mavica (1997-2003)

The Sony Mavica line began in 1997 with the release of the MVC-FD5 and FD7, which were priced at (roughly) $500 and $700, respectively. Both cameras recorded onto 1.44MB, 3.5" floppy disks, which were found in every computer in that day. Getting your photos onto your Mac or PC couldn't be easier, with no cable required. Each disk held between 15 and 40 VGA-size pictures.

The MVC-FD5 was the first digital camera to use floppy disks as storage. [Photo credit: PC Watch]

The FD5 was the basic model, with a fixed F2.0 lens, equivalent to 47mm. The FD7, on the other hand, had an F1.8-2.9, 10X zoom lens equivalent to 40 - 400mm. While the FD5 required you to flip a switch to shoot close-ups, the FD7 had an auto macro mode, which is common on modern digital cameras. Photos were composed on a 2.5" LCD which had 61,380 dots. Both cameras had built-in flashes.

The MVC-FD5/FD7 used 3.5", 1.44MB floppy disks as storage. [Photo credit: PC Watch] The two cameras had 2.5" LCDs and even a four-way controller. [Photo credit: PC Watch]

Believe it or not, these two old cameras had both scene modes and picture effects. Yep, in 1997 you could turn on 'sports lesson' mode, or create a 'pastel' image.

As camera resolution increased, Sony realized that a floppy drive just wasn't going to cut it. The MVC-FD92 had a 1.3 megapixel sensor, and you could only fit five or six photos on the disk. Sony's solution was to add a Memory Stick slot to its floppy-based cameras. A 16MB Memory Stick could store a whopping 24 photos. You could get photos off of the camera using USB or, if you really love floppy disks, use Sony's MSAC-FD2MA Memory Stick adapter.

The massive MVC-CD1000 was the first Mavica to use 3-inch CD-R discs. You'll also notice that it sports an electronic viewfinder. The CD1000 retailed for a whopping $1300.  [Photo credit: Digital Camera Resource Page]

Sony's next move was to switch from floppy disks to CDs. Not just any CDs, though. These were 156MB. 3-inch CD-R discs which, of course, weren't compatible with most CD-ROM drives of that era. Sony didn't forget about that issue, and included a 3-inch to 5-inch adapter.  Not only did these CDs hold a lot of data, they were also very inexpensive. Back in the year 2000, a 160MB CompactFlash card was over $350, while Sony sold the CD-R discs for about $4 a pop.

Astute readers may have already picked up on what the problem was with using CD-R discs. That is, they were write-once, just like film. Thankfully, CD-RW discs soon arrived, allowing you to 'erase' photos from the disc. The most frustrating part was the confusing 'finalization' process, which was so complex that Sony included a flow chart in the camera manual.

There were many reasons why the various Sony Mavicas were revolutionary, but the relative ease of getting photos off the camera and onto your computer is the one I remember the most.

Comments

Total comments: 223
123
FRANCISCO ARAGAO
By FRANCISCO ARAGAO (8 months ago)

I bought in 1996 my first digital camera, a Panasonic PV-JB1000, no zoom, no flash, it used the slooooooow serial port for upload the photos. In a bright sunny day it could produce some decent pics.

0 upvotes
piratejabez
By piratejabez (8 months ago)

My family went through three Mavicas; cheapest storage solution out there at the time :) Boy have cameras come a long way...

0 upvotes
M Hamilton
By M Hamilton (8 months ago)

My dad still SWEARS by his Kodak DC260, refuses to use anything else. I think I actually tried to get DOOM running on it but my dad squashed that idea.

5 upvotes
Agneta Sarinske
By Agneta Sarinske (8 months ago)

Oh my, this brings back memories... I had two Mavicas, one F90 using floppies and a memory stick, one using mini-cd's. I took a portrait of my mother with the latter, and to this day - with a 4mp camera - it is one of the best portraits I have ever taken. From there the Sony Cybershots, going from F505V to F717, F828, and then a H5, H7, H9 and deserting the Sonys for Panasonic megazoom compacts and Pentax DSLR - K10, K7, and now K5. A M3/4 - Panasonic G5 - is now my favorite travel companion, but nothing can beat the K5. I am thankful for all those old friends for having taught me a lot. Did I really spend all that money???

3 upvotes
Robert Morris
By Robert Morris (8 months ago)

I still have my Samsung SSC-410N a very unusual 3 mpix camera from 1998. One of my first ones and IQ was good for the day.

0 upvotes
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (8 months ago)

one thing was also interesting,

All these digicams looks like "cutting edge of new tech!" look at them !!!! LAst thing you notice on them is their photo gear (such as lens :) but evertyhing else takes so much places !

In the middle of 2nd decade of 2000´s , they start to look like their older models. Even brands are produ with them :) just interesting

(ps: Its actually a desireable feature that I wish to see on automative industry. Engine based its flwaless now, diesel, bensine even hybrid or hidrogen !! but they looks like /&%¤# !!! just recreate the 60´s sedan impala body, all the same look as back on these days with eurncap 5 star standards !! Thats it :) )

1 upvote
David 247
By David 247 (8 months ago)

Interesting and fun article. It predates my first journey into digital which was in 2000, with the Olympus C2100 UZI. Thanks.

2 upvotes
Camediadude
By Camediadude (8 months ago)

The UZI should definitely help to kick off part 2!

1 upvote
Robert Morris
By Robert Morris (7 months ago)

Yes a really great cam, Oly made some really good ones back them, but soon lost their way for a long time.

0 upvotes
scarynige
By scarynige (8 months ago)

"Other things, such as detachable lenses, scriptable operating systems, and music playing capability have all gone the way of the dodo bird. "

What about the most numerous cameras out there today, on smart phones that incorporate music players and can run apps, and have accessories that allow additional lenses to be added? I wish the dodo such a good future!

4 upvotes
Walsh_uk
By Walsh_uk (8 months ago)

In 1998 I bought a JVC GC-S1 (640x480) on my honeymoon at manchester airport for £300 !! 40% off! what a mistake... my pictures are rubbish

http://www.digicamhistory.com/1998%20G-K.html

Lol...

0 upvotes
JimmyMelbourne
By JimmyMelbourne (8 months ago)

Probably could have included the sony f707 in there just for the unusual form factor and laser focusing technology, which was ground breaking.

6 upvotes
Jeff Keller
By Jeff Keller (8 months ago)

That's for part 2!

4 upvotes
gnathaniel
By gnathaniel (8 months ago)

I still have my Kodak DC260 :) also have the 1MB Compact Flash card i got with it!

1 upvote
Mike_Hessey
By Mike_Hessey (8 months ago)

Sorry, most of these you have picked are certainly history for me. First digital camera was Nikon 900 (was it a Coolpix in those days?). Still have it somewhere. A set of best AA batteries would last, if I was very lucky, for 10 pictures, and it was S O S L O W - anything that moved at all was impossible to shoot. Later 990 was a vast improvement (compared with the 900!). Perhaps after that experience, I regard regard current 16M cameras as having achieved the 'sweet spot' in terms of IQ etc. 24M cameras (I have two) are fine as cameras, but the effect of the file size on both my 2012 Macbook Pro and 2013 PC is painful, and for my purposes (web postings, and prints up to A3+, or once 6ft by 8ft) this res is adequate.

0 upvotes
Chillbert
By Chillbert (8 months ago)

I too wanted to put in a bad word for the Nikon Coolpix 900. Terrible battery life, horrible lack of speed, generally incredibly disappointing. I haven't forgiven Nikon, yet.

It looked like this: https://www.google.com/search?q=nikon+coolpix+900&client=firefox-a&hs=7Yf&sa=X&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=fflb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ei=FS4UUsPHGOblyQHo9IHwAQ&ved=0CDUQsAQ&biw=1440&bih=787

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
David M Warwick
By David M Warwick (8 months ago)

Does anyone else remember the Canon Ion digital camera.

1 upvote
Martin Kulhavy
By Martin Kulhavy (8 months ago)

I remember Ion Cannon from Command & Conquer.

7 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (8 months ago)

The Canon Ions were technically still video cameras, and not digital at all. The sensor was electronic, but with an analogue output, and the images were stored in analogue form on a magnetic disc.

0 upvotes
Henry Falkner
By Henry Falkner (8 months ago)

In 1997 I bought an ES-1000 digital pocket camera. Later research showed it was made by Chinon, who I remember as a maker of Super-8 consumer-type Cine cameras in the 1960ies. The ES-1000 had a fixed lens, an optical tunnel view-finder and no LCD. Maximum resolution was 493x373 pixels. Pictures downloaded via RS232 cable to a PC. It had no external memory. The saving grace was, the Lithium battery lasted for ages, and contrast and saturation was better than I could get from scanning 5x7 inch 35mm camera prints.

0 upvotes
scott_mcleod
By scott_mcleod (8 months ago)

Chinon! Now there's a name I haven't heard in years... I remember seeing the glossy and impressive-looking ads for the CP-5 SLR in Pop Photo (showing my age now!)

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (8 months ago)

People loved (and love) that instant gratification. I sold a lady an Olympus point and shoot, maybe 1.3 mp, for over $900. A few years later, she wanted to trade it in and its investment value was on a par with its image quality.

0 upvotes
ArcaSwiss
By ArcaSwiss (8 months ago)

I had a Fuji DS300 back in 1997. I think it cost about $2500. One megapixel ! Wasn't bad though well made

0 upvotes
offertonhatter
By offertonhatter (8 months ago)

A friend had the Mavica floppy disc camera. She used it for primary school. At the time it was perfect as the kids could have their own floppy disc and use the camera. Great idea for teaching at the time. I bet now that the 7-10 year olds now have their own smartphones for that sort of thing. How times change.

0 upvotes
Klaus Weber
By Klaus Weber (8 months ago)

This nice piece was the first digital camera that we got in our shop back then - Logitech Fotoman, 256 greyshades... :) (Seems like it was called Dycam Model 1 in US)

http://www.digicammuseum.de/samm/logitech_fotoman_fm1.htm

2 upvotes
all_digital
By all_digital (8 months ago)

You missed the Obsidian. Used C mount lens.

0 upvotes
all_digital
By all_digital (8 months ago)

I still have my QV10 purchased in Hong Kong in Jan 1996. Considering it cost $750.00 then today's cameras are a bargan. l

1 upvote
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (8 months ago)

All I remember of these early cameras was that they were, in terms of IQ, the very definition of the words awful, horrible and monstrous... but very nice to see what has changed so immensely and so quickly. Thanks!

1 upvote
CWDaly
By CWDaly (8 months ago)

Nice list! How come you left out the Apple QuickTake? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_QuickTake

0 upvotes
TitusXIII
By TitusXIII (8 months ago)

I've got a Casio back in 1997 but I just can't remember if it had a rotating lens.
Sold it same year to a guy in Mexico.

0 upvotes
mikiev
By mikiev (8 months ago)

Something Sony tried with the Mavica cameras - as the popularity of those floppy-based cameras waned - was an adapter which allowed a memory stick to be placed in a floppy-sized adapter.

I believe it was intended to increase the storage size of all those Mavicas they sold, and allow Mavica owners the luxury of not being forced to carry a bunch of floppies with their camera.

But I thought it was also a great way to get data from a memory stick to a computer - before USB & thumb-drives became so widespread - because what computer didn't have a floppy drive, back then? :).

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/609458

As a long-time Mac user, i remember REALLY wanting to get one of the Mavica cameras, since it was so easy to import photos into a Mac. I was just never impressed enough with the picture quality to actually buy one.

0 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (8 months ago)

I used to work at Jessops and I would often advise people not to buy digital cameras. And that was in 2001!

I can't imagine how unimpressed I would be with a camera that cost $750, took 4AA batteries that lasted an hour, had to be sent back to the manufacturer if power failed during downloading AND took absolutely awful pictures!

How did digital ever get going? I remember even top-of-the-range Canon EOS DSLR's having purple fringes round everything. Now I've got a bagfull of Nikons and can't remember what film looks like. Go figure....

10 upvotes
David M Warwick
By David M Warwick (8 months ago)

i, too worked in Jessops at that time, the thing I remember is the price of memory cards. Gigabyte cards and above were not invented yet! i remember the introduction of the 1GB microdrive, it cost over £300.

4 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

Lower MP pictures also took up considerably less space than a 20MP+ RAW file tho. I've still got a whole bunch of >64MB CF cards.

0 upvotes
Samaistuin
By Samaistuin (8 months ago)

For Part 2: you'll cover the original Ixus, right?

0 upvotes
Nokaoi
By Nokaoi (8 months ago)

I think one of the first consumer digitals was the Apple Quicktake. This site is an interesting compilation of camera history, including digital cameras.
http://digicamhistory.com/1994.html

I didn't get a digital camera until 2002, but after that there was no looking back. I hardly used my 35mm SLR after that.

3 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (8 months ago)

Nice article, Jeff.

Ricoh, Casio and Epson were digital camera pioneers and had many interesting designs and approaches in those days. Some of the first "modern" cameras for Casio and Epson were the Casio QV-3000 and the Epson PC850Z.

That Fuji vertical format had a sophisticated interface and the Kodak DC290 (successor to DC260 and last in the line) was an excellent camera with a compact TIFF mode, much like Canon's later compact RAW files.

Scripting the camera by the Kodak DC290-we are only starting to return to that area and the potential has only been slightly explored.

2 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

I had a DC290! My first digital camera, it's also the most expensive camera I've ever owned... I think it was some sort of gift (that i conned my farther into) during my senior year of high school. That thing also had better time lapse and long exposure modes than a lot of or P&S or mirrorless models do these days.

Honestly, the prospect of digital cameras was super appealing to a geek back then, I dunno why the rest of the world had any pause, waiting for film processing seemed so slow when I could download a song in nearly half an hour on my blazing fast 56k modem! :P

2 upvotes
tornwald
By tornwald (8 months ago)

In another 10 years digital might be already so good it surpasses film

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (8 months ago)

Digital has surpassed film of the same size long ago.

6 upvotes
tonywong
By tonywong (8 months ago)

Surprised no one has complained that these reviews took almost 20 years to finish.

Does this mean I can finally buy the QV-10 now? Why didn't it get a Gold Award?

(Just kidding guys, neat article!)

16 upvotes
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (8 months ago)

I'm impressed the equivalence police isn't out in full force, complaining about lack of DOF (or too much of it) and gibberish about the lenses being equivalent to F32 "because of the small sensor".

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (8 months ago)

Where is my old Hitachi MPEG cam?

1 upvote
Jeff Keller
By Jeff Keller (8 months ago)

I was trying to put it on the list, but it was really hard to find information about it!

1 upvote
onlooker
By onlooker (8 months ago)

Jeff, scroll down on this page:
http://www.smecc.org/hitachi.htm
and check here for announcement:
http://www.hitachi.com/New/cnews/E/1997/970127B.html

I am looking forward to part 2. :)

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (8 months ago)

Of these, I think only (the original 1981) MAVICA, QV10, and DC260 would make my list. The DC260 makes my list not just for Digita, but also for being the first digital where the dominant artifacts did not look like video sensor defects (e.g., lens flare instead of row/column sensor saturation). What else do I see differently? Well, for example, one of Minolta's detachable-lens Dimage models and Canon's G1 would show up on my list, and not so much Fuji. Anyway, it's good to see some remembering of the early history....

1 upvote
kadardr
By kadardr (8 months ago)

It`s so good the nineties are over.

2 upvotes
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (8 months ago)

I cant say it in therms of pop music and family ties. But yeah well, technology improoves and we are all here right now, from all around the world.

www !!

0 upvotes
Mark Smith
By Mark Smith (8 months ago)

Technology has improved to give us spell check as well :)

1 upvote
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (8 months ago)

:)

0 upvotes
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (8 months ago)

Man.. they takes me back :D

I remeber a fujifilm´s big stake holder was decleared a speech included these;

"foto film sector is diying... hence we want to sell our share, and want to contine our investing to an immortal bussiness: COSMETICS. "

:)

0 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (8 months ago)

I recall my first digital Fuji Finepix A110, 1.3MP focus free, 20sec 15fps no audio video.. and memory was so expensive...very limited but was fun that time :)
Too bad it's gone... would be a nice collection to have

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
scott_mcleod
By scott_mcleod (8 months ago)

My first digicam was a Finepix A101 (also 1.3MP focus-free). It ate batteries and was unpredictably slow (or not) to write an image. The XD cards (terrible idea) were small in capacity and very expensive. The colors were really great though, and the JPG compression was very minimal so overall IQ was better than you might expect from the specs, and the macro mode was better (sharper) than the standard mode. I got it as a Christmas present in 2001 and it saw me through until 2005 (including photographing the 2004 transit of Venus) when it was retired in favour of a short-lived (drowned) Canon A95. But I still have it and it still works!

0 upvotes
Paul De Bra
By Paul De Bra (8 months ago)

And no mention of the Agfa 1680, a nice camera at the time (1999) with swivel design that we see in that Casio and that later made the Nikon Coolpix 950 iconic. Despite being named 1680 the Agfa 1680 had a 1.3MP sensor (but could save upscaled images).
A friend of mine introduced me to the Agfa 1680, of which he was using a preproduction unit. This was not only my first digital camera (with serial connection to the computer) but also my first experience with camera theft. (The camera was stolen when our house was broken into. The burglars left my Olympus film slr alone. They must have known the future was digital.)

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
oklaphotog
By oklaphotog (8 months ago)

You left out the Dimage EX 1500!

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/minolta1500

3 upvotes
Jeff Keller
By Jeff Keller (8 months ago)

Didn't forget, just ran out of room!

1 upvote
KentG
By KentG (8 months ago)

How could you leave out the first non-Kodak DCS non-hybrid DSLR, the 1.75 MP Minolta RD-175 back in 1995?

0 upvotes
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (8 months ago)

is not it amazing ,physically it is just about 20 years ago. But feels like "B.C. 23" in terms of todays image quality and possibilities. Just unbelieveable !

The film had said the final word from the beginnig untill year 2000 (even a bit later, My last film pictures came back in year 2007 I guess!) And now, guys under/around 20 years old does not even know such thing :)

Just amazing how fast the time passes by. (I am 29 anyway :D , but feels old man you know what I mean !)

1 upvote
tt321
By tt321 (8 months ago)

Music playing and scripting/user programming have been re-discovered for cameras in the form of mobile phones...

One day there will no longer be a camera that cannot make a call.

0 upvotes
leakybrain
By leakybrain (8 months ago)

No mention of the Logitech Fotoman from 1992? I bought a fotoman plus for ~$500 in 1993.

1 upvote
fhe
By fhe (8 months ago)

QV-10 cannot possibly have been the first consumer digital camera. My dad had a roundish one with a name like Sony? IOS (impossible to google nowadays) which stored data on 2.5" disks. It must have been at least a couple of years before 1995.

0 upvotes
mister_roboto
By mister_roboto (8 months ago)

"The QV-10 was one of the first consumer digital cameras" not "the first"

1 upvote
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (8 months ago)

Still Video Cameras (like the Canon ION) recorded images as video scan lines similar to a paused tape - technically not digital.

1 upvote
fhe
By fhe (8 months ago)

@mister_roboto: Sure, but it was years after. That's a pretty wide definition of "one of the first".
@Erik: Right... I guess it depends on if you limit "digital" to the sensor or media... Thanks for the correct name.

0 upvotes
Danny
By Danny (8 months ago)

I had a Mavica, floppy and fixed lens. My first digital camera.

1 upvote
PIngp0NGMW
By PIngp0NGMW (8 months ago)

This is a great review of digicams from years past. I remember some of these as my family was an early adopter of digicams back then. These kind of reviews always make me think that if someone went back in time and showed even a basic "disposable" P&S to an engineer from 1995, it would blow their mind. The technologies we have now and take for granted in digital cameras (1080p video, wifi connectivity, GPS, multi-gigabyte flash memory, etc.) seem all the more incredible when you consider where we came from. Heck, even when I look at the early digital SLRs from even 10 years ago the comparison is startling. I look forward to the days of inexpensive 4k video and full-colour holographic images!

0 upvotes
SiriusDoggy
By SiriusDoggy (8 months ago)

I had a Mavica FD-91. Recorded to floppy disc. If I remember correctly it would hold about 15-18 shots per disc at the "high-resolution" setting.

0 upvotes
thegunshow101
By thegunshow101 (8 months ago)

They still have this camera on Amazon and I love reading the very first reviews circa 1999..

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-MVC-FD91-Mavica-Digital-Optical/product-reviews/B00001SIGS/ref=cm_cr_pr_top_link_4?ie=UTF8&pageNumber=4&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

0 upvotes
SiriusDoggy
By SiriusDoggy (8 months ago)

Yeah, unfortunately I haven't owned a computer with a floppy drive in about 5-7 years.....

0 upvotes
RedRockRed
By RedRockRed (6 months ago)

Has anyone mentioned the PalmPix attachment to the Palm? An unseeable low res screen, way too little memory, plus a touch screen shutter button that almost always blurred the pic. I have one buried in a drawer somewhere.

http://3.static.img-dpreview.com/files/news/1250352283/palmpix2.jpg?v=2505

0 upvotes
Total comments: 223
123