For some of us, photography is a hobby. For others, it's a way to make a living. For Forrest Sargent, a 22-year-old with autism who is unable to speak, it's a veritable lifeline. His communication is limited to spelling out words using a letter board, a method which allowed him a much-needed way to express himself. 

Beyond that, he communicates with a gift from his parents bought for his 19th birthday: a camera. His photos capture family and landscapes, and perhaps most importantly, open up another avenue of expression to him. In his own words, photography gives him 'a way to show my feelings and my real mind'.

In an article in the Bellingham Herald, his parent explain how they 'installed a grip handle at the bottom of a point-and-shoot camera to help him manage', and how Forrest - who suffers from medication-induced tremors - has adopted the habit of taking five pictures at a time to maximize the chances of getting a sharp image. 

 Photo by Forrest Sargent.
 Photo by Forrest Sargent.
 Photo by Forrest Sargent.
 Photo by Forrest Sargent.

Some of Forrest Sargent's images might look like little more than snapshots, but his work is a welcome reminder that for some people, photography is about a lot more than learning techniques and collecting expensive gear.