Canon EOS-1D X overview

The Canon EOS-1D X is the latest in the company's professional range of DSLRs. Its job is to replace both the sports-orientated 1D series and the high-resolution, studio-focused 1DS range of cameras. As is usual for upgrades in this class of camera, the changes are incremental and subtle but aim to raise the bar of what is possible.

The biggest specification change to the 1D X is its new sensor - an 18MP full-frame CMOS chip capable of shooting at 12 frames per second. This represents a big change over the 1D Mk IV (it represents a move away from the smaller APS-H format that Canon has previously used in its sports cameras), and a decrease in pixel count compared to the 1DS series. However, as Rick Berk, Technical Specialist in Canon USA's Pro Engineering and Solutions Division says: 'there's more to image quality than just resolution.'

The move from APS-H up to full-frame is enabled by a sensor with faster data readout explains Chuck Westfall, Technical Advisor in Canon USA's Pro Engineering and Solutions Division: 'The new sensor has 16-channel, dual line readout, compared to 8-channel, single line designs in the previous generation of chips.' This lets the company offer a large sensor (and the low-light capability that brings) for 1DS users, with the fast capture speeds that current 1D Mk IV users need. 'It's clear the time has come for the 1DX to replace the whole 1D series,' says Westfall.

Under the skin, the big change is the more sophisticated metering sensor. A move from the 1D Mk IV's sensor to a new 100,000 pixel unit affords the camera a much better understanding of the scene and this information is fed into the camera's autofocus system to improve the quality of its AF tracking. This isn't a new idea (Nikon's sports cameras have done something similar for several generations), but it's a sensible way of improving what's already an impressive system.

Autofocus changes

The other big change to autofocus is simpler configuration. The 1D X does away with the complex inter-related network of custom settings that defined AF behavior in previous models, instead offering six presets for different shooting situations (see table below). Each of these can be adjusted for 'Tracking sensitivity' (which defines how doggedly the camera attempts to stick with the originally chosen target or whether it will re-focus on nearer subjects if they cross in front of the target), 'Acceleration/Deceleration tracking' and AF point auto selection (how readily the camera should move off the selected AF point).

Westfall acknowledges the complexity of the previous systems could prevent users getting the most out of previous cameras: 'A common response to the 1D III and 1D IV was that people loved the idea of a high spec AF system but they wanted an easier way of get the most out of it. The improvements from the 1D III to the 1D IV were substantial but also incremental - to make a bigger step forward this time we needed to start from scratch.'

Canon EOS-1D X AF mode presets, defined by subject behavior:
1. Versatile multi purpose 4. Subjects that accelerate or decelerate quickly
2. Continue shooting, ignore obstructions 5. Erratic Subject Movement
3. Instantly refocus suddenly with obstructions 6. Subjects that change speed and move erratically

In addition to making the system more accessible, the 1D X has the first entirely new AF arrangement since the launch of the (film-era) EOS 3 in 1998. The new 61-point AF sensor has 21 cross type AF points at the center, which are sensitive enough to be used with lenses with maximum apertures as slow as F5.6. The central five of those points also have diagonal AF elements that are active with F2.8-and-faster lenses. All other AF points are sensitive to horizontal detail with lenses faster than F5.6, while 20 of these (in two flanks towards the outer edges of the sensor), act as cross-type points with F4 maximum aperture lenses or faster.

As with the EOS 7D, the AF point selection can be narrowed-down to a series of sub-sets of local AF points. It's also possible to adjust what factors are considered during AF tracking: AF info only, AF and color information or AF and face detection information.

Getting a sense for the sensor

When asked to for the biggest improvement in the new camera, Westfall stresses that every aspect of the camera has been re-assessed but finally concludes: 'If you had to highlight just one thing, I'd say the sensor. It's a new level for us in terms of image quality.'

'There's a couple of things that we consider when we think about IQ: number one on this sensor is noise. It's clear the noise level is better than in the 1D Mk IV or the 1DS III. The pixel size is larger than in the 1DS III or 5D Mark II (6.95 microns, versus 6.4) and the difference is even more striking compared to the 5.7 micron pixels in the 1D Mark IV. That helps us in terms of light capturing ability and increases the signal to noise ratio. In turn, that does nothing but help the dynamic range of the camera.'

And its this improvement in image quality that Westfall believes will make the 1D X appeal to 1DS as well as 1D users. 'I think the factor that's going to make that a reality is the noise level is better than anything we've seen before. With cleaner images, people are going to feel much more comfortable up-rezing an image. Not many people need a 21MP file to begin with, so they're going to love the IQ of this camera and the quality's good enough that those people who do need those huge files will find the images clean enough to use them.'

Changes to the body

The body of the 1D X closely resembles previous 1D cameras, but close examination reveals a series of changes. The most significant is perhaps the addition of a second joystick on the rear of the camera, to ensure all functions remain available when using the portrait orientation grip. The camera also features twin buttons next to the lens, in either orientation. These are customizable, allowing you to access features such as the electronic level gauge or jump to registered AF point.

Beyond this, the camera gains a direct live view button, a 'Q' button to jump to the 'Quick' function menu, and has had its flash exposure lock button re-dedicated as a customizable function button.

Processing power

As you'd expect, the camera's processing has received a considerable refresh, Westfall explains: 'You've got dual Digic 5+ processors, which our engineers are telling us are 17x faster than the Digic 4s used in the existing models.' In addition, the metering sensor, given its added complexity and the need to interpret its output to feed into the AF system, gets its own Digic 4 processor.

This processing power allows the camera to conduct a wider range of lens corrections. In addition to the vignetting correction that could be conducted by the 1D Mark IV, lens profiles can be uploaded using EOS utility and the camera will correct for geometric distortion and chromatic aberration (both lateral and axial) in real-time. These corrections are all optional and can be engaged separately.

Another benefit of more processing power, combined with an improved sensor is an expansion of ISO range, says Westfall: 'The ISO range on this camera, just the standard range, goes from 12,800 on the 1D Mark IV and 1600 on the 1DS Mark III, up to 51,200. And this can be expanded up to 204,800 - that's going to be an enabler of all sorts of new possibilities for a lot of people.'

The final processing option is the ability to shoot multiple exposure images. Four combination methods are available, which can be used to create composite images either from consecutive shots or from an existing Raw file and an additional exposure.

All about speed

The faster sensor and greater processing power are combined with a new carbon fibre shutter and revised mirror mechanism to allow 12 frame per second continuous shooting. The camera can shoot at 14fps if you're happy to lock the mirror up (and hence lock focus), and capture only JPEG images. The shutter has a rated lifespan of 400,000 cycles (a 30% improvement on before, despite the additional demands of the faster continuous shooting). The company also says it should be more accurate at high shutter speeds. It also offers an X-sync speed up to 1/250th of a second.

At first, the move from 10 to 12 frames per second doesn't sound terribly impressive - until you remember that the camera is now based around a larger sensor, so there's a much bigger mirror to move. Westfall is keen to stress this: 'The high-speed rate is greatly improved. Our full-frame cameras up until now have only been able to offer up to five frames per second, whereas this can shoot at 12fps, or 14 if you're willing to shoot JPEG. The 1D X means you can have full-frame quality and high speed.'

The EOS-1D X gains twin customizable buttons next to its lens mount - one set for each orientation

In the frame to be flagship

Of course it's no longer enough for a camera at this level to just be able to shoot stills, and the EOS-1D X is Canon's most capable movie shooter yet. Although the headline spec (1080p at 30, 25 or 24 frames per second), isn't exactly groundbreaking, it's clear that Canon has had movie shooters in mind.

The 1D X offers two compression options, including 'All-I,' a very low compression format that offers high image quality and editability but at the cost of immense files (a 16Gb card will hold around 6 minutes of footage). The alternative is a more standard IPB compression that takes up around 1/12th of the space. To prevent these large files limiting the camera, the 1D X is the first Canon to be able to split a single piece of footage into multiple files, overcoming the 4Gb limit of the card file system, and allowing videos of up to 29 minutes, 59 seconds to be recorded.

In addition the camera can keep track of how long it has been recording, using standard timecoding methods. There's also greater-than-ever control over the microphone input volume, with 64 manually selectable levels, auto and a wind-cut filter. It's also possible to mute sound recording while shooting.

Westfall believes the 1D X has the features that pro shooters will want: 'I think people are looking for a balance between cost and performance - the cameras offering 60P at the kind of bit rates that we can offer tend to be in a higher price bracket. And we can offer 720p at 60 frames per second,' he says.

'People we're dealing with are tending towards using 24 - to match the filmic look. There are cameras offering 60P in the consumer market but they haven't got the bit rate we're offereing. Many of them are limited to less than 30mbps while we're bumping up against 50. This is a clear difference - we think this product keeps moving the ball forward. With this product the focus was improving the compression. The other thing people were requesting was the ability to shoot longer clips and on this model we can shoot for up to nearly 30 minutes.'

'Within this range of products we offer, this is going to assume the flagship postition,' he says: 'It will be the most desirable product for people wanting movie shooting in a DSLR.'

Any other business

Beyond the big changes is a move to twin CF cards. As before these can either be set to duplicate images onto both cards or overflow from one to the next. You don't have the option of separately storing movies and stills, however. The upgrades to the camera also extend to a revised dust-reduction system for the sensor. The wave-motion of the shake system is being called 2nd generation dust prevention by Canon.

Another change to the 1D X's storage is the addition of an Ethernet 1000 Base-T network port. This allows faster transfer speeds and the use of longer cables (the limit is 100m, rather than around 3.5m for USB).

The final significant change is another gain from the EOS 7D - an electronic overlay on the viewfinder, allowing AF points and the level gauge to be shown in the viewfinder. Other than that, the camera retains essentially the same viewfinder specs as the 1DS Mark III - a huge 0.76x, 100% coverage pentaprism that 1DS users will be familiar with and 1D series owners will really appreciate after years of using cropped APS-H finders.

Comments

Total comments: 363
1234
jamesfrmphilly
By jamesfrmphilly (Oct 18, 2011)

i was going to go nikon for the multi exposure.
this keeps me at canon.

0 upvotes
KiboOst
By KiboOst (Oct 18, 2011)

Nice camera, good to see Canon rethinking it overal (metering, AF etc), but wow, replacing 1Ds line with a 18mp sensor ? Big fail here, I'm waiting at least 30mp and amazing IQ at low iso, don't care about speed. Sure won't replace my 1DsII with 1DX. I do slow shot, tripod, low iso, large fine art print, no need for low res machine gun. If a 1DsX around 30mp don't come soon, I think it will be time to go to the other side, D800 seems appealing even if I largely prefer a big monobloc body like 1D for vertical shooting and general feeling in hand. 5D body size don't really appeal me, maybe D4x then ? 1DX make me starting to look ar Nikon lenses, even if it's a damn good camera for sport/bif shooters.

5 upvotes
stephoto
By stephoto (Oct 18, 2011)

no mention of AA filter? may it be weaker than the previuous one on 1dsmarkIII?

0 upvotes
Jeff Greenberg
By Jeff Greenberg (Oct 18, 2011)

"people are going to feel much more comfortable up-rezing"

Especially if Canon advises as to the best up-size workflow...
Am eager to see in-camera multiple exposure function added to 7D line!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Alxy
By Alxy (Oct 19, 2011)

May be they meant that people will be up-rezing more with 18mp then with 32mp camera, which everyone was waiting for?

1 upvote
Steve oliphant
By Steve oliphant (Oct 18, 2011)

Wow finally ,they get it, I would love to see anyone post real faxes on the resolving ability on any 35mm lens .I think the very best Canon or Nikon lens will resolve 119 line per mm ,so about 10 mp ,if you want to interpolate use photoshop, it will do a great job.Im a Canon user and I was about to go to Nikon because they make better cents at 12mp, good on ya Nikon ...

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Sigh. So you think that the results from a 1D4 (16MP) and 1D3 (10MP) are pretty much the same then? I've shot with both. The 1D3 can't hold a candle to the 1D4.

Photoshop interpolation is NOT a replacement for higher resolution sensors. Suggest you try it. You can even do it off the same camera - take a small JPEG, and a full size one with the next frame. Increase the size of the small one in PS. Now compare the two. See? No? Make it simple then. Try with a 10 by 10 pixel image interpolated to 16 by 16, compared to a 16 by 16 original. The results are more obvious here, and the same thing happens with higher resolution.

I agree resolution isn't the only factor, but it is a factor, and a fairly important one. So long as the pixel quality is high, I'll take more megapixels please.

5D2 is a case in point here though. Higher resolution than the 1D4 by some margin, but lower IQ. I want my cake and eat it too. Lots of pixels, high quality, and lose the shutter speed.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 18, 2011)

single-pixel-camera is the ultimate answer to those who prefer pixel quality over image quality.

2 upvotes
noisejammer
By noisejammer (Oct 18, 2011)

I have tested this number. I checked a 70-200 IS Mk 2 using a 7D. Pointing it at the stars, the lens resolved to single pixels in red and green. There was some chromatic aberration present in the blue channel, but it was still very good. Since the 7D pixels are (iirc) 4.3 microns, it could be argued that the lens was operating at around 115 lp/mm. My experiments with a 135L yielded very similar results.

There is however quite a lot of space at the top - a truly diffraction limited f/2.8 lens should be able to reach 585 lp/mm in green light.... assuming you could live with the absurdly thin DoF.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Chez Wimpy
By Chez Wimpy (Oct 19, 2011)

>I think the very best Canon or Nikon lens will resolve 119 line per mm ,so about 10 mp

I hope I am reading this wrong. The 24TSEII (to pick an example) resolves over 45MP worth over the FF image circle. How do I know? Stitching with my 18MP APS-C camera lets me see some of the FF potential, and this is still sharp at the pixel level. Telephoto lenses are better still...

2 upvotes
Esbutt
By Esbutt (Oct 18, 2011)

Isn't it worrying that Canon is still using the same basic sensor technology and data readout that it was using 10 years ago?!?

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

No. Look at the images produced.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 18, 2011)

isn´t it worrying that 98% of all cars still use a otto motor and that you still need electricity for a lightbulb after more then 100 years?

7 upvotes
noegd
By noegd (Oct 18, 2011)

Nice specs! I'm quite (pleasantly) surprised by the return of CF cards and the inclusion of Gigabi Ethernet after the move to SD and all those WiFi adapters.

3 upvotes
TekWarrior
By TekWarrior (Oct 18, 2011)

CF still has the better write speeds and for the 1D line I believe it never left the CF route...

2 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

CF was never lost, there was the addition of an SD card in the 1D series on the 1D2 if memory serves. This annoyed me.

Much better to be allowed to use a second CF at the same time, with higher capacity, faster write speeds, and you need only buy one memory card format.

Wifi (and now GPS) adapters remain as unfortunate, clunky add ons. This is the biggest annoyance with this series of cameras. wifi and gps should be built-in - like they manage to do with their compacts.

1 upvote
allywishs
By allywishs (Oct 18, 2011)

By the time I can afford this,they will have something better that I can't afford. However , this is a step in the right direction. Actually, a price drop on the old stuff would be nice.

1 upvote
Robert Rafai
By Robert Rafai (Oct 18, 2011)

They need to test this yet a lot if they going to release it for 5 months. I'm Nikon fan and user but Canon deserve to have decent rival camera after Nikon released my D3 before ~4 years.
This is camera which 1D mark IV should be. :)
And if they going to release this for 5 months noone will buy any 1D series till April from any shop after this news, I think that's some kind of "fail" moment but OK, there is some good news for people who was thinking to replace Canon for Nikon completely... they can still wait this few months and be happy for 6800 bucks ;)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Sigh. Yes, you love your Nikon. Thrilled for you. Really.

1 upvote
love_them_all
By love_them_all (Oct 18, 2011)

Can't wait to see the image samples.

BTW I am still convinced that a 30-40mp 1D is in the making.

1 upvote
Baudesign
By Baudesign (Oct 18, 2011)

6800$

0 upvotes
jcmedeiros
By jcmedeiros (Oct 18, 2011)

Full Frame JPG @ 14 fps - staggering

2 upvotes
itaibachar
By itaibachar (Oct 18, 2011)

Just sank in, launch March 2012?!.... that's 5 months from today...

0 upvotes
001FJ
By 001FJ (Oct 18, 2011)

Coming from a D700 user, I really like this camera. I am glad Canon is making a product that makes sense to me: full-frame,and reasonable resolution (MP). I chose Nikon because I choose high ISO performance and auto focus speed and accuracy over MP anytime. I can't wait to see the ISO results from this camera :) And I can't wait to see what Nikon has in store--let the competition begin! :)

The only two things I kind of don't like about this camera is that the buttons seem too small (or is it just me?). May be they look small to me because the camera is big, I don't know. Also, the camera isn't that pretty--reminds me of the Porsche Panamera!--it's just not sleek looking. But again, "pretty" is not on my list of what I am looking for in a camera :)

1 upvote
jwhig
By jwhig (Oct 18, 2011)

AS I posted in reply to another comment below, the English Canon press release says:

The EOS-1D X offers a carefully revised version of the classic EOS-1 series design, with larger, more tactile buttons that make it easier for users to control settings – even in extreme conditions where gloves are required.

1 upvote
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Nikon also make high MP cameras actually. So do Leica and Hasselblad - their cameras are also held in high regard, and not criticised for offering higher performance.

'Also, the camera isn't that pretty--reminds me of the Porsche Panamera!--it's just not sleek looking. But again, "pretty" is not on my list of what I am looking for in a camera :)'

--And yet you mention it? Personally I think ergonomics matter, appearance not so much. I find a 1D more comfortable than Nikons - maybe try one for a week or so and you might find the same, or maybe you'll still prefer the Nikon. Comfort's important, I think.

I think this is an impressive spec. camera, but still fails in a couple of areas where it didn't need to. I'm not going to buy one.

0 upvotes
MP Burke
By MP Burke (Oct 18, 2011)

I haven't been able to find out how much this camera weighs. Will it set a new record for a 35mm dslr? Now, how about trying to make a digital slr (for those who want a 35mm sensor but don't want high speed motor drives) that is no bigger and heavier than the film slrs of the 1970's or 1980's?

0 upvotes
therickman
By therickman (Oct 18, 2011)

It's a sports and studio camera anyway. It'll be on a monopod or tripod 99% of the time. Photojournalists, wedding pros and landscape shooters have the much lighter 5DII. Otherwise, hit the gym.

2 upvotes
itaibachar
By itaibachar (Oct 18, 2011)

And the bank...

1 upvote
Qwntm
By Qwntm (Oct 18, 2011)

Yes but landscapes shooters can destroy a 5DII in a matter of months... How about a SOLID SMALL large sensor camera?

1 upvote
Brian Noah
By Brian Noah (Oct 18, 2011)

I'm a wedding shooter. I have no problems carrying my 1 series around all day on a 10 hour day. This is the perfect wedding camera for me.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

I'd love a lighter 1D. I wouldn't trade function and quality for weight though, so if it has to be heavy to incorporate all that, so be it.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 18, 2011)

1D + 5D may be a compromise but the operations are different. btw, is there anyone uses 300/2.8 (or 400/2.8?) for wedding?

0 upvotes
aleckurgan
By aleckurgan (Oct 18, 2011)

DSLR portfolio optimization before mirrorless camera introduction?..

0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Oct 18, 2011)

One camera to rule them all! Congratulations Canon. Can't wait for the 5D version!!! (or 3D??)

0 upvotes
Robin Chittenden
By Robin Chittenden (Oct 18, 2011)

I have had problems with 'mirror slap' with Canon EOS1D Mk4 , especially on rapid fire. I see this one has a larger mirror. Be interested to see how users get on with this one.

0 upvotes
Gary Eickmeier
By Gary Eickmeier (Oct 18, 2011)

Mirror? What is a slap-happy mirror doing in a camera?

Sony no Baloney

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Every camera has some issue with mirror slap - it's why there's a mirror-lockup facility. I've only used rapid fire at sports events which I don't do very often, and I confess I haven't seen a problem with it. I have seen issues with the AF not continuing to follow a subject accurately when rapid firing, and this certainly can cause some focus issues - could this be what you're experiencing?

If I'm shooting macro I use the mirror lockup feature, or for sure, it would cause sufficient vibration to cause a little blur.

I do think the mirror should be quieter though. Much quieter. Nature subjects can be disturbed by it from some distance, even using the 'quiet' mode. Using macro in the wild, I rarely get more than one shot of a flying insect before the camera noise scares it off.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 18, 2011)

I see no reason to have a mirror in the first place, why should anyone need it?

0 upvotes
itaibachar
By itaibachar (Oct 18, 2011)

Good for Canon!
But I'm a bit worried/disappointed about the small area the focus points cover. They're cramped into the center of the frame, very limiting our composition options to a centralized subject.
Me not like...:-(

2 upvotes
Marco 2k7
By Marco 2k7 (Oct 18, 2011)

true. but may having focus point close to each other come handy when your are tracking a subject?

0 upvotes
itaibachar
By itaibachar (Oct 18, 2011)

If your subject is the torso yes, but I like to focus on people's heads, and they are not located at the center of a typical frame. I really dont understand this design feature. It is handicapping an otherwise great tool.

0 upvotes
TekWarrior
By TekWarrior (Oct 18, 2011)

The illustration in the other article may be deceiving on it's relation to the edges. But if not I know I usually set my AF to use center, half press, compose then finish. Except when on the tripod of course. But the layout seems to cover the two "thirds" that you need for composition... We'll see, I want to see this one in action and with people using it in the real world, it looks promising, but only time will tell.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

This is a good point - it'd be nice to see cross focus points nicely dispersed throughout the frame. I don't always want to track in the centre of the frame. Rarely, actually.

0 upvotes
JoeAmateur
By JoeAmateur (Oct 20, 2011)

The mass of 21 center points leaves another 40 for creative focus on the perimeter...er...that's a bunch.

Having better focus for telephoto lenses is a boon to those of us with long lenses, like the 100-400 f4.5/5.6L. At 400mm, maintaining focus on a moving subject is an issue, even with IS.

When I'm off wildlife and on landscapes, I don't think I'll struggle much with focal point selection on the perimeter, even with ONLY 40 to choose from.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Marco 2k7
By Marco 2k7 (Oct 18, 2011)

Lots of people complaining about 18Mp.

More Mpx =/= High quality.

Less Mpx = less noise and that's what matters.

5D MkIII high mpx for studio work will be out in a few months so stop whining.

Your turn nikon.

Btw like someone said before, canon and nikon fights only bring better cameras to us so...those are pretty welcome :D

And let's hope they stay on 14-16 mpx for consumer APS-C cameras. If they keep that resolution, lower the noise and bring top end DSLR technology to prosumer, it would be awesome.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
jwhig
By jwhig (Oct 18, 2011)

Except the 1100D, all Canon's APS-C cameras are 18mp. I don't expect they will drop below that resolution.

0 upvotes
TekWarrior
By TekWarrior (Oct 18, 2011)

Reading the articles so far, it appears Canon is claiming the new sensor is allowing for less noise, it has a 6.95 pixil size, which is the largest yet according to what I read, and the article claimed that it made for less noise. Long and short they said you will be getting more Mpx at less noise (We'll have to wait and see if that is really true).

0 upvotes
Nigel Bolton
By Nigel Bolton (Oct 22, 2011)

5D had 8.2 pixel size as did the 1DII. Though of course the gapless micro lens design is different.

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Oct 18, 2011)

Nice camera but somehow I dont like its design and ergonomics.
Come On Nikon its your turn now.....8-))

0 upvotes
jacktorrance
By jacktorrance (Oct 18, 2011)

How can you comment on ergonomics without holding the damn thing?!

5 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

I suppose one could extrapolate from it's appearance and dimensions based on knowledge of the existing 1D range?

0 upvotes
TTMartin
By TTMartin (Nov 27, 2011)

Or one could just be a Nikon Troll and come to that conclusion.

0 upvotes
stephenjelliott
By stephenjelliott (Oct 18, 2011)

Nikon D700 user here. This looks like a great product and a bold move by Canon especially with Sony chasing megapixels like they're going out of fashion (which, ironically, they may well be!)

A battle for IQ between Canon and Nikon can only benefit us all!

11 upvotes
001FJ
By 001FJ (Oct 18, 2011)

I am a Nikon D700 user too and I agree with your comment. My D700's 12MP has never been too little for my needs, so 18MP will be plenty.

0 upvotes
Gary Eickmeier
By Gary Eickmeier (Oct 18, 2011)

Well, that sounds like a challenge. We will await dpreview's figures on all comers.

Sony no Baloney

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 18, 2011)

less pixels doesn't give you better image quality man. if it's the pixel quality that anyone may want, go straight for an one-pixel camera.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Heh-heh.

0 upvotes
Apozmao
By Apozmao (Oct 19, 2011)

If we view this from another perspective, we can see that as a subsidiary in the photographic world, that what Sony are currently chasing are marketing facets that will appeal to the ignorant consumer. In the market segment where the a77 / a65 are being sold, this is the case; Canon / Nikon sells by their names and Sony are required to attract appropriate attention (in this case using a big number followed by 'mega pixels.' To the contrary, a professional will not be directly deterred from his cause in the segment where $7800 cameras are sold. He / she is aware of the requirements equipment wise that are necessary to complete their task.
Please do excuse my English and discrepancies in my knowledge :).

1 upvote
JoeAmateur
By JoeAmateur (Oct 20, 2011)

Sorry to disagree, but more pixels do create more noise. The pixel density on many sensors is starting to cause noise on the quantum level; noise is generated when the electrons striking the sensor are deflected by interference from adjacent pixel site's magnetic field. This effect increases as the sensitivity (ISO) is increased, which requires more power and more quantum inteference at each pixel site. Bigger pixels mean the chances of electrons arriving unmolested is greatly increased, so image accuracy is increased, and noise (quantum interference) is reduced.

Manufacturers are going to have to eventually increase sensor size to get Nikon's 12mp quality at 32mp resolutions, until materials technology changes the physical properties of the sensor altogether.

All that said, I get fantastic prints all the way up to 20x30 with my 7D noisemaker. We spend far too much time criticizing magnified screen images, when good prints from quality compositions are what makes $$$.

0 upvotes
SomeKindOfMichel
By SomeKindOfMichel (Oct 18, 2011)

blah blah blah... many complains about the sensor resolution. 18 mp is really enough for all the prints (even with 12 mp I can print up to A2). For really large prints, there is the 645D....

This new body is a real jewel/beast for video shooting:

- full frame sensor -> low depth of field
- sensor pixel size bigger than 5D MKII -> an even lower noise level
- improved moiré, artifact and aliasing -> overall better image quality
- recording of time codes -> easy multi-cam synch or sound/video synch
- exceed the 4 GB limit -> recording up to 29'59'' (in the EU)
- gigabit ethernet -> will probably allow recording to remote storage...

And all of that in a robust body (better than 5D MKII) -> nice for shooting movies in bad conditions.
There is absolutely NO contender. This is really a beast for video shooting. The only major drawback (speaking for myself) is... the price... even though....

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

You say that 18MP is enough for anyone, and then say if it's not, buy a differnet camera that already has a higher resolution. Isn't that a contradiction?

And no, I wouldn't call it a jewel or a beast for video. Certainly it's better than the existing half-assed implementation of video on the 1D4 that's awkward to use.

Video has been shown to be important to the customer base - even a number of TV shows have now been shot on Canon SLRs, and I really like the way these shows look. The profusion of video-dedicated accessories for these SLRs may be a more telling indicator. I occasionally tinker with video just because it's there, and for me it's a nice to have feature on an SLR - a factor to consider if you can't choose between one model and another after comparing all their stills features, but I understand that it means more to others.

I don't think that movie makers would often choose an SLR over a dedicated video camera though.

0 upvotes
JoeAmateur
By JoeAmateur (Oct 20, 2011)

Yeah, Anthony Bordain's No Reservations uses 7Ds, and I like the look.

I see that video focussing issues were omitted from the conversation completely. Hmmm.

DSLRs may not crack major networks, but the quality/price point has opened up video to the masses that lack the $100k spare bank to get into film "seriously." I think we'll be seeing new creative geniuses emerge that may have been marginalized in the past...

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Oct 18, 2011)

So, FF and APS-H users have been "merged" to this.

Brilliant. The customer base just doubled.

1 upvote
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

I fully expect a high MP camera (real 1Ds3 replacement) next year. Canon would not yield high pixel count pro camera to Nikon and Sony after having it for 2002 to 2008.

0 upvotes
Alxy
By Alxy (Oct 19, 2011)

I think Nikon will release some new models, including one high Mpx model. That will show the direction to Canon again. Only after that will see the Canon's answer with high Mpx.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Oct 18, 2011)

hold the MP and thus permit higher fps... makes sense for once
only i wish they offered firmware alternatives to up the fps to older models if shooting at lower MP settings...

0 upvotes
TekWarrior
By TekWarrior (Oct 18, 2011)

Maybe they will... oh wait they want you to spend money, so I doubt it..

0 upvotes
mihapf
By mihapf (Oct 21, 2011)

The influence of Red is obvious: Faster, more dynamic range, less noise.

0 upvotes
LVPhoto1
By LVPhoto1 (Oct 18, 2011)

Canon Congratulations…as the user of the MkIV’s for my business, if this turns out to be a great camera….you’ll have my order for 4.

1 upvote
Andrei Todea
By Andrei Todea (Oct 18, 2011)

As a Nikon user wanting to go pro, I hope Nikon doesn't announce a 36 MP sensor to compete with this camera's 6 digit ISO.
Congratulations to Canon for stopping the megapixel race (and starting the ISO race, which sounds more useful).

8 upvotes
magic_carpet
By magic_carpet (Oct 18, 2011)

If MF lenses are important to you, you might think about a system switch. I seriously doubt that the D4 will have such a gigantic OVF like the 1D X.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Oct 18, 2011)

Andrei Todea:

Years ago Nikon stopped the MP race with the D3 and also won the high ISO race.

It's possible that this new Canon will best the Nikon D3s, but that Nikon has been out for more than two years, so don't pretend--without examples--that this Canon brings a new standard to high ISO work.

Just look at the lies (yes lies) Sony told about the A77's performance at ISO 6400.

0 upvotes
Andrei Todea
By Andrei Todea (Oct 18, 2011)

You are right. They did release the D3s almost 1 year after the D3x so it's Nikon who took the first step in the high ISO race instead of more MP.
I still want to congratulate Canon. With your help I understand that it's not for starting to care more about ISO instead of MP but for... following Nikon.
What if the rumors are true and Nikon announces a 36 MP D800 or D4?

0 upvotes
Andrei Todea
By Andrei Todea (Oct 18, 2011)

BTW, what about the A77? In my opinion it does a great job at ISO 6400 for a DX camera. It's not like the D7000 but that's a Nikon and it benefits from 33% less resolution so one would expect much better results anyway.

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

Most likely the D4 will be in the 16 to 18 MP range. The 36 MP rumor is most likely for the d4x.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

You guys heard of the Canon 1D4? Released over a year ago? Similar market to the D3S? Comparable high ISO capability to the Nikon D3S? The Nikon had the edge here I think, but you can hardly claim the 1DXrepresents a massive change in direction in terms of high ISO support as a response to the D3S - both manufacturers were moving in the same direction, probably due to price vs. technology limitations in other areas, they chose another feature to squabble over. They pretty much always do, don't they? Competition is good for the consumer, so long may it continue.

0 upvotes
Alxy
By Alxy (Oct 19, 2011)

A77 is SLT - mirror is half transparent. It remove 1/2 stop from ISO performance.

0 upvotes
Ceesprof
By Ceesprof (Oct 18, 2011)

The drop of 4 MP makes now a difference of 6MP with the Nikon D3 and the Sony camera.
Especially in the advanced stock photography and for those photographers making large prints, the pixel count is very important.
With this new Canon camera we can shoot very fast pictures that we can't sell (stock) or can't print large enough.

2 upvotes
Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik
By Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik (Oct 18, 2011)

I don't think 1Dx was ever intended strictly for studio. It's an all-around camera for pro shooter. However, even for stock, I can't see the reason for 18 mpix beeing too small. You can print A3 at 300 dpi with that for Christ sake! We use 5Dmk2's for our business, and I honestly can't remember when was the last time anyone used our photo for 300dpi print larger then that. Counting that the upscaling claims hold true, I really don't see a problem with resolution.

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

What Sony camera? Sony has a professional sports/pj camera? They don't.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Drop? It's an increase over the 1D Mark IV.

I want a lot more than 6MP to be added, but I like the high ISO, better pixel quality.

I hope this doesn't mean we've lost the option of a much higher resolution, low frame rate camera in the Canon range though. I liked the 1Ds series, and think there's still a place for it. I hardly ever shoot at the 1D4 max speed (usually one shot actually), so I'd be very happy to see resolution win over shutter speed.

0 upvotes
Alxy
By Alxy (Oct 19, 2011)

> By Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik
> ... However, even for stock, I can't see the reason for 18 mpix beeing too small.

On Fotolia for example the XXL size is 15Mpx and it sells for the highest price. If I have 18Mpx it is less likely that the final image will be cropped to less than 15Mpx - loss of income for stock shooters. And not only from the price difference. I suspect that a buyer is more likely to by a smaller version of XXL image or buy from a person who offer XXL images.

0 upvotes
Marcel Mutter
By Marcel Mutter (Oct 18, 2011)

Canon is going backwards on THE following point.

On the 1D mark IV you can separate the pictures and the movies to separate memory cards.

0 upvotes
imagenes_vivas
By imagenes_vivas (Oct 18, 2011)

No, I own a 1D IV and it is not possible to do that.

0 upvotes
Marcel Mutter
By Marcel Mutter (Oct 18, 2011)

You can read it on page 147 of the manual (English) item 3 last line.

Yes Canon hide it well. ;-)

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Though it makes rather less sense when one card is SD and the other CF. Hmm... Do I choose photos or video to be saved to the higher capacity, faster performance card?

0 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Oct 18, 2011)

The drop in resolution is very encouraging. I don't know that we could really call Canon courageous since, after all, most pro shooters know that it's not all about megapixels, but they are certainly more trusting of the intelligence of their photographers than Sony and the A77's 24MP.

I very much want to know more about that dynamic range which could be very useful to me.

3 upvotes
m3rocket
By m3rocket (Oct 18, 2011)

Does the X use a new battery system or the one from the 1D/s III/IV? I find it curious that it isn't mentioned--which hopefully means it DOES use the same existing batteries...

0 upvotes
boredphuck
By boredphuck (Oct 18, 2011)

its using LE-E4N

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Oct 18, 2011)

Canon is moving back into the organic looking body last seen in the 1DMk2.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Really? 'Cos I'd say the ID3 and 1D4 are pretty damn similar to the 1D2 and the pics of the 1DX.

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Oct 19, 2011)

Yes really. Do you know what organic means?

0 upvotes
williams359
By williams359 (Oct 19, 2011)

I have owned a 1 D MK 11 111 and i now own the IV but unless the price drops a lot i cant see me buying one of these. £5299 is just two much, i know it will come down to around £4500 but thats still around £1000 more than the IV which is a dam fine camera. I dont think canon realise that there a lot of full time pro's like me who will be forced to turn there backs on the 1 series. I know a lot of pro's who use the MK IV but none that use the 1 DS MK111 why? price and this new 1dx is 1DS MKIII price.

0 upvotes
clydo
By clydo (Oct 18, 2011)

why do people keep saying there is now only one 1D series camera? All the announcement is saying is that they got the best of both the 1D IV and 1Ds III to make the 1D X. The FF from the 1Ds III and the speed from the 1D IV. I wager there will still be a successor to the 1Ds III which would probably be 36 MP+ while the 5D III might be lesser specified to differentiate the two. Could Canon come out with 3 FF sensors?

1 upvote
clydo
By clydo (Oct 18, 2011)

DUH, press release says REPLACEMENT for both..... my bad...

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

But I call that good marketing. No reason not to think they won't launch a new high MP camera next year. They are just trying to get more users to buy this camera now, and then also the real 1Ds3 replacement. If you owned a 1Ds3, would you buy this camera if you didn't have $6800 laying around?

0 upvotes
jh2bh
By jh2bh (Oct 18, 2011)

Westfall says: "Not many people need a 21MP file to begin with". But I guess everybody needs 18MP.

The "three brains" processing system probably could have exceeded 12 or14 fps by a considerable margin if coupled to a sensor of 6.95 micron pixels in the APS-H format.

And R.I.P. the 1.3 crop factor. Welcome softness around the edges. I'm going to miss using only the highest quality center portion of my L lenses.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Seconded. I really don't understand the fuss about FF.

I can live without the poorer resolution and increased distortion found at the edges of most 35mm format lenses.

I've heard many wedding photographers make smug comments about how their FF 5D2 is so superior to my APS-H 1D4. When you match photos taken side by side with both cameras, they tend to quieten down somewhat whilst their cheeks flush.

1 upvote
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Oct 18, 2011)

It's a real nice camera, but I wonder why Canon is not making those buttons a little bit larger.

0 upvotes
jwhig
By jwhig (Oct 18, 2011)

From the UK Canon press release:
The EOS-1D X offers a carefully revised version of the classic EOS-1 series design, with larger, more tactile buttons that make it easier for users to control settings – even in extreme conditions where gloves are required.

0 upvotes
tlinn
By tlinn (Oct 18, 2011)

I find this new model more curious than exciting. I think sports shooters will be thrilled. Wedding photogs with strong biceps will be too. It will be interesting to see just what is gained in image quality and low light capability given the loss in resolution. Speaking only for myself, resolution is not just important for print size; it's also important for cropping.

It will be equally interesting to see how this fares compared to Nikon's upcoming D4. I don't think you can grade Canon without taking into account what Nikon is able to do with their next iteration of the D series.

My biggest disappointment is the lack of built in radio-controlled flash system. This was the number one capability I was waiting for. Canon patented a system a year and a half ago and they've filed additional patents since. This seems like such an obvious game-changing feature. Unless it debuts in a 5D III or a new high end body, it's likely to be a long wait before another opportunity comes around.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik
By Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik (Oct 18, 2011)

I think that's reserved for new 5d, which will probaly be more studio-oriented camera with higher resolution, slower speed and more attention given to flash.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Based on what information?

0 upvotes
ihv
By ihv (Oct 18, 2011)

Despite being proud of the speed Sony seems to be more powerful with already available product, and for such a machine the 1Dx 60fps option is missing for Full HD? Already today, long time ahead with the production, little bit underspecced?

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Oct 18, 2011)

Which Sony? This Canon is most likely to destroy anything from Sony, though below ISO 400, and with a Japanese Zeiss, the Sony A900 takes nice pictures, slowly.

1 upvote
Gary Eickmeier
By Gary Eickmeier (Oct 18, 2011)

Yep - looks like they are really getting scared of Sony more and more. Let's see if Canikon catches on to SLT.

Sony no Baloney

1 upvote
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

Only a fool would consider the a77 a competitor to the 1D line from Canon. The 1D X makes the a77 look like a toy.

1 upvote
Knight Palm
By Knight Palm (Oct 18, 2011)

By killing the APS-H, which had an inherent area handicap corresponding to -¾ EV relative to 135-format, this camera automatically gets a better S/N ratio than the previous 1D MkIV. But also being a later generation of the sensor technology should bode well for further increase in DR. How good in comparison with other competitors, DxOMark is one source to tell...

For economy of scale, you want to proliferate your sensor to other usage. Maybe this is the sensor we'll see in a future mirrorless camera from Canon?

1 upvote
Miguel Teotonio
By Miguel Teotonio (Oct 18, 2011)

I use Nikon but this sounds nice!

1 upvote
ksgant
By ksgant (Oct 18, 2011)

Would be interesting to see how much it is to actually manufacture these cameras. Wouldn't it be a kick in the teeth to learn that it only costs Canon like $200 bucks to make them?

0 upvotes
wildbild
By wildbild (Oct 18, 2011)

it will be a kick in the teeth for you to learn that allraedy the silicon used in that brick costs a fortune—imagine that!

0 upvotes
demchinsky
By demchinsky (Oct 18, 2011)

Pre-Ordered!
(Well, will be)
1Ds wil be up for sale .. after the next couple of weddings.

0 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (Oct 18, 2011)

If it's less than 20Kg I'll check it out... just kidding...:-) We need to wait for a couple of reviews, now... (preferably from bodybuilder reviewers :-))

0 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (Oct 18, 2011)

I should start looking for a high quality push-cart!!! :-)

I have been a Canon guy since the days of the A1 (since 1980), when I was just starting college, then a large number of other models, including a number of T90's, and a much larger number of Canon FD lenses. So I'm die-hard Canon fan.

Great camera, and great capabilities, no doubt (at a hefty price of course).

It's interesting to look at Canon's first top of the line DSLR, nearly 10 years ago (30D), and compare its capabilities with this new beast! What an incredible progress in a decade!

However, as great as the Canon high-end DSLR's are, I still do not like the looks of them. Somehow they look like gorillas to me.

The styling, or ergonomics is old, very old (very much from the T90 days, late 1980's).

Canon needs to restyle the high end cameras, and not continue the old Volkswagen way (of updating their vehicle styling every 15 or 20 years, which nearly killed them a while back).

I am looking forward to the EOS5-III.

0 upvotes
jrfoto53
By jrfoto53 (Oct 18, 2011)

Well, personally I like the styling of the Canon EOS-1 series, always have since it was introduced with the T90. I fnd the styling of the Nikon D3 much less pleasing, with knobs and switched etc. seemingly stuck on at random onto a kind of square-ish body.
Having said that, a camera is tool so it doesn't matter really what it looks like.

1 upvote
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Oct 18, 2011)

They kept an Apple-like lid on this news until the last couple of days.

Bold move on their part. I will be very interested in seeing the IQ

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

Um... Yeah... You do realise it's not actually in stores for another five months right?

1 upvote
David Lee Tong
By David Lee Tong (Oct 18, 2011)

OMG... 18MP + 6-digit ISO...

Crazy! Most wedding photogs would jump on this, let alone the efficiency it'll bring in terms of flash usage as well.

http://reviews.davidleetong.com

2 upvotes
jackpro
By jackpro (Oct 18, 2011)

pow canon has hit a home run now we just need some better lenses!

1 upvote
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Oct 18, 2011)

Wait for the Nikon home run with the D4, and Nikon has no need for better lenses they already have them, that's why many Canon pro users always carry a Canon to Nikon adapter and some wide and ultra wide Nikkor lenses

0 upvotes
Photogaz
By Photogaz (Oct 18, 2011)

Fill me in, what lenses are better with Nikon than they are Canon?

I say this while holding my 70-200 f2.8 IS Mark II ;)

3 upvotes
ksgant
By ksgant (Oct 18, 2011)

Don't let this degenerate into Canon vs. Nikon. They're both very nice systems.

9 upvotes
TomSavage
By TomSavage (Oct 18, 2011)

I hated my 2.8 70-200mm . Not! LoL

0 upvotes
Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik
By Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik (Oct 18, 2011)

Nikon 14-24 2.8 comes to mind... This comes from a Canon user, frustrated with it's' 14 2.8 / 16-35 2.8 combo!

0 upvotes
Photogaz
By Photogaz (Oct 18, 2011)

But you can't base it on 1 or 2 lenses. The 70-200 f2.8 II smashes the Nikon variant for example.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

14-24 isn't really a sports lens, which is what the 1D X and the 1D line is.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 18, 2011)

Drazen, I know several Canon boys who use 14-24/2.8 on Canon bodies. you will better get an adapter that can control aperture. I jam the aperture with a small plastic stick when use G lenses but it' cannot be accurate.

0 upvotes
barri
By barri (Oct 18, 2011)

While I shoot Sony A900, I really like this new camera. Seems like the perfect compromise of resolution and speed.
I hope, Sony will release something similar in the time to come.

0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Feb 13, 2012)

@Photogaz, I hardly see this as the Nikon being "smashed" by the Canon:
http://www.photozone.de/canon_eos_ff/510-canon_70200_2is28?start=1
http://www.photozone.de/nikon_ff/511-nikkorafs7020028vr2ff?start=1

DPreview's test results look similar. Although, truth be told, I haven't even seen the need to "upgrade" to the II version for what I use it for. YMMV.

The only Canon lens I lust for is the 17mm TS-E. But lack of that lens isn't preventing me from accomplishing anything, so...meh.

0 upvotes
Delpartal
By Delpartal (Oct 18, 2011)

I think the most amazing of this camera is the noise management and the quality and image (dynamic range), and for me are also suficentes 18 Mpx.

It is my next camera ....I hope!

1 upvote
sensibill
By sensibill (Oct 18, 2011)

I must mortgage my house.

5 upvotes
TomSavage
By TomSavage (Oct 18, 2011)

Sell my Bugatti

2 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

I'll buy you a couple of these in exchange for a running Bugatti. :)

(And no, not the kettle or coffee machine...)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
G Davidson
By G Davidson (Oct 18, 2011)

Incredible camera, just looking at the high ISO capabilities amazes me. I'm not sure anything much else can be expected from a medium resolution, full frame DSLR at this time. It'll be interesting to see Nikon's response.

0 upvotes
lancespring
By lancespring (Oct 18, 2011)

Well, until we see some actual photos, we will not know just how good the high ISO performance will be.

We also don't yet know how good the upcoming Nikon D4 will be in high ISO performance. I'm confident that Nikon will be working to raise the bar also.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Oct 18, 2011)

I love my 1D4 - some nice upgrades here, but I don't really call about full frame, and so it's not enough to make me upgrade. I was waiting for a super-high-resolution, low frame rate version with better movie integration - when it comes, I'll buy it.

When it comes, I'll expect it to have GPS and wireless built-in, like Canon seem quite able to do with their tiny bodied compacts, but prefer to sell as expensive add ons (each costing more than double the price of a compact that includes the function, and together being of similar volume to a compact that oh, happens to have a whole camera inside as well!) for their professional cameras. At this price, with this size of body, there's no reason these functions can't be built-in. I don't mind the price of the body, but I won't pay stupid money for stupidly designed, awkward to use, 'stuck-on' chunks of plastic, and since I expect those features in my next SLR, I won't be buying another Canon until it's included.

2 upvotes
J D Tranquil
By J D Tranquil (Oct 18, 2011)

Totally agree with Dmatter. 18 mp feels just right for me.

1 upvote
Dmatter
By Dmatter (Oct 18, 2011)

I happy that megapixel war is over.

9 upvotes
dimalozz
By dimalozz (Oct 18, 2011)

We`ll see it in 5DmarkIII :)

0 upvotes
Total comments: 363
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