Hands-on with the Olympus OM-D E-M5

Buy on GearShopFrom $799.9924 deals

Olympus as a company may have had widely-publicized problems recently, with its very future threatened by financial scandal, but this doesn't seem to have adversely affected its camera designers at all. After the classically-styled PEN series, they've again looked to the company's film camera heritage, in the form of one of its most fondly-remembered lines: the OM series of 35mm SLRs. The result is the OM-D E-M5 - a camera that looks like an old-fashioned manual focus SLR but which is as modern as it gets, under-the-skin.

The OM-D is still a Micro Four Thirds camera, but Olympus says the line is distinguished from the existing PEN range by the type of user expected to buy it; being aimed more towards the enthusiast who wishes to engage with manual control. In practice, the E-M5 differs from the E-P3 by having an inbuilt electronic viewfinder and tilting rear screen, plus weatherproof construction, upgraded 5-axis image stabilization and an improved 16MP sensor. The cameras are still built around very similar features and controls, though. Olympus says that the OM-D line is likely to be expanded to multiple models, with higher- or lower-spec (and price) versions equally possible dependent upon the E-M5's market acceptance. Despite its high-end features such as weather-sealing, the company is not calling the E-M5 a pro-level camera.

The E-M5's firmware isn't quite finished, and the camera is still a few months away from being available in the shops, but Olympus invited groups of European journalists to try it out at a series of press events in Amsterdam last week. The cameras we used were essentially finished in terms of hardware, but running non-final firmware (v0.95) and offering not-quite-finalized image quality. Sadly this means we can't bring you a gallery of full-size sample images as we'd have liked, but can only show downsized samples. Instead, I'm going to offer some thoughts in how it handles, and a few subjective thoughts on speed and image quality. 

For our previously published in-depth hands-on preview of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 click here

Design and Handling

The E-M5 is a small camera - probably smaller than you think from looking at pictures. It may look like an OM-4, but it's noticeably smaller, and that camera was one of the most compact manual focus SLRs. Despite this its magnesium alloy shell offers a good heft in your hand and its metal top-plate dials which offer satisfyingly positive click-stops as they rotate. But because the camera is small, its buttons are tiny too. Thankfully they have a long and positive travel, which means they're more usable in practice than they look when you first pick the camera up. Users with large hands might still find them fiddly, though.

The camera is notably well-set up for eye-level shooting, indeed its ergonomics are comparable to high-end DSLRs such as the Pentax K-5. The two overlapping top-plate dials offer quick access to the main exposure controls - shutter speed, aperture and exposure compensation - and can be customized to work exactly as you'd like. The four-way buttons on the rear are used directly to move the AF point around the frame - a notably quicker solution than on other mirrorless cameras with EVFs such as the Sony NEX-7 or the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3 (at least in its default setup). Notably there's no direct ISO button, but you can customize a button to access this if you wish.

The E-M5 is comfortable to hold even without the accessory grip - the rear thumb 'hook' offering a solid grasp - but you'll want the added security of a wrist strap at least. As a left-eyed shooter I found the rear dial to be a little awkward to reach with my thumb, but sufficiently close to the shutter button to be easily operable with my forefinger. The add-on grip changes things slightly - it certainly provides a much more positive hold, but in doing so moves your hand away from the Fn2 and REC buttons, making them distinctly less-easy to reach.

Olympus's excellent on-screen 'Super Control Panel' is still available, with the added bonus that you can now use the touchscreen to select the parameter you want to change (although you still have to spin a dial to set it). Oddly though it's not enabled by default, which we'd have thought would make sense on a model at this level - you have to delve into Olympus's labyrinthine and not-especially-intuitive menu system to turn it on. This won't faze existing Olympus owners, but new users may well find it bewildering; the E-M5 has one of the longest menus we've ever seen.

Viewfinder and screen

The E-M5's electronic viewfinder has the same spec as the add-on VF-2 for the PEN models, which means it's very good indeed, if perhaps no longer absolutely class-leading. Its central positioning makes for a very SLR-like handling experience, particularly compared to the offset EVF of the Sony NEX-7.

The rear screen is the same excellent bright, highly visible OLED touch-sensitive unit as the E-P3, but now it also tilts up and down for waist-level or overhead shooting. Because it doesn't swivel, it doesn't work so well when you turn the camera to portrait format, but in practice its wide viewing angle makes this less of a problem than you might expect. The touchscreen has the same tricks as the E-P3, most notably the ability to position your focus point by touch. 

In amongst the excitement about the E-M5's 5-axis IS system, one other feature has generally gone unremarked - the ability to activate IS with a half-press of the shutter button, which allows you to see the effect in the viewfinder just like working with a stabilized lens. It's a really helpful feature, and one we hope will be helpful for manually-focusing adapted lenses where magnifying live view exaggerates hand-shake.

Operational speed

With the E-M5, Olympus is reclaiming the title of 'world's fastest autofocus', from the likes of the Panasonic DMC-GX1 and Nikon 1 cameras which surpassed the E-P3. But this is notably only for static subjects - not for tracking moving objects. With fast internal-focus lenses such as the matched M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-50mm F3.5-6.3 kit zoom or the lovely M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm F1.8 portrait lens, the E-M5's autofocus  is impressively quick (although to be honest these cameras have reached a point that it's very difficult to tell a difference any more).

The E-M5 can shoot at an equally impressive 9 frames per second. In this mode focus and metering are fixed, and there's understandably no live view view between frames (although the screen doesn't black out completely, but instead plays back your recently-captured frames to help keep track of what's happening). The rollover below, which covers 1 second of action, illustrates how this can work in practice.

12345678910

If you drop the continuous shooting speed to a still-pretty-rapid 4.2fps the camera will attempt to track focus during shooting, and maintains a live view feed between frames in the process: the first Olympus Micro Four Thirds camera to do so. In principle this should help track your subject when panning.

1428
I own it
263
I want it
174
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 215
12
dneilson2
By dneilson2 (Apr 29, 2012)

Hi,

I've been a Canon and Nikon user from the beginning and changing to micro 4/3 system (huge learning curve for me).

Currently waiting on the OM-D E-M5. And a new Oly 50mm f/2.0 lens "for E1, E300 & E500 Digital SLR Cameras".

Will I need an adapter?

I realize focus will be dreadfully slow on the macro (I shoot in manual focus for macros anyway). But want to set myself up to receive other Olympus AF lenses in the future as I build my kit.

Do I buy the Olympus MMF-3 4/3 Adapter for $179 (Amazon)? Or the cheapies by fotodiox for $20? Again, I'd like AF functional on future lenses except this macro.

Anything else I should know from you Oly veterans? Might there be a manual equivalent as sharp as the new AF 50mm lens cheaper elsewhere? Seems a waste to pay for AF if I won't be using it.

Help would be immensely appreciated. Thank you all in advance!

Dolores

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Shomari
By Shomari (Apr 26, 2012)

Man I really like Oly's filters. Still deciding though.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Apr 12, 2012)

My wife is eagerly awaiting her E-M5 - deliveries in Europe is said to start at the end of the week ;-)!

For my own needs the Nikon V1 has mostly replaced my DSLRs - something I didn't think would happen, ever. So for me, mirrors are ancient history, and Olympus seem to have caught on!

It will be exciting times from now on - will the mirrors go away totally, or what will happen next?!

0 upvotes
Valentinian
By Valentinian (Apr 11, 2012)

I really need to upgrade, and am seriously considering this camera. But I was disappointed too many times, so am waiting for the dp review.
Also didn't decide yet which lens(es). Too bad the 12-50 is so slow ... wish Olympus converted the 12-60 to m4/3 and contrast AF...

0 upvotes
Kenri Basar
By Kenri Basar (Apr 8, 2012)

I wonder what specifications OMD EM6 will carry when EM5 sounds/ looks complete.... maybe just higher resolution and larger sensor and a flash...or go "connected" like Samsung.... I really want this camera but I am so broke... :(

0 upvotes
mogenie
By mogenie (Mar 28, 2012)

Superb review and camera. Recently delighted with purchase of Pen EP-3, one of the greatest bargains in the history of photography, which has only one weakness: action autofocus. This machine certainly fills that need. Not much happens between frames at 9 fps and this "battle" is at the "who cares?" level of the megapixel wars of a few years ago, when Canon went backwards on the G11 and went for larger more sensitive pixels, and images got better, low light photography has been totally transformed (the EP3 @ 12,000 ISO produces very acceptable images). My son shoots LaCrosse and this camera has the speed for that lightning fast sport. The photographer now is the limiting factor, not the auto focus speed. I'm selling all my Canon gear for the vastly lighter, faster, cheaper Olympus lineup.
Mogenie

0 upvotes
avaldia
By avaldia (Mar 16, 2012)

The body is an unshamed copy of the Konica FS1, even in the lens hood shape and desing:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lee0001/2338330173/
FS1 dimensions:146x90x46, not bad for the 1979 film camera.

0 upvotes
boodo
By boodo (Mar 20, 2012)

Not very clever statement. Brave fabrication. Where did you find Konica, in what aspect E-M5 reminds you of Konica? Olympus designers have no reason to copy anything but their own OM series, body shape, even single button design and ergonomics.
They aim exactly to OM, they even left out few good OM solutions, probably with good reason.
Maybe we can just say they copied SLR design in genaral, at least you can't invent new and better lens hood, 150 or more years too late. Same things are simply generic, I expect the dails and buttons on today's (& future) cameras to be rounded etc.
I don't care for any company, but it is so clear that they are trying to maintain good (Maitani) attitude to design intended for users. It looks to me they are compensating 4/3 decision on every other level they can. In today's more&more uniform world I always appreciate courage and originality. & that's it.

At the end they sell their product to us, of course. I wish they give it to me for free. ommmmm

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
malmeida14
By malmeida14 (Mar 23, 2012)

I have since 1989 an OM4-Ti and when I see the OM-D E-M5 silver it seemed very similar to OM4 Ti
See the pictures:
http://horten.no.sapo.pt/fotos/OM4T/om4t_as.jpg
http://horten.no.sapo.pt/fotos/OM4T/om4t_bs.jpg

0 upvotes
Jimrob
By Jimrob (Mar 8, 2012)

I just hope the tiny controls/buttons are larger than the Olympus Pen EP1 I tried at a store last weekend. The main four way control diall is sized for a slim eight year old, not a hefty 65 year old like me. I really hope the controls are usable for me, as I'm looking for a camera to travel with easily. I have a Nikon D2x that I had used when I was a pro shooting mainly in the studio, but I took the Nikon and lenses on vacations which took up a whole Pelican suitcase sized case. I need a small easily portable camera with image stabilization and very good image quality. This and the new Sony Nex-7 seem to fit the bill (the Sony has no camera stabilization and some lens availability issues I understand), provided the controls are large enough.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MPA1
By MPA1 (Mar 5, 2012)

If you think a Pentax K5 is a high end DSLR your definition of high end and mine are not at all the same!

0 upvotes
TheLastMan
By TheLastMan (Mar 14, 2012)

As a K-5 owner myself I could take offence at your remark, but you are right. The K-5 and the OM-D E-M5 (name far too complicated IMHO) are clearly shooting for the same market, those needing a small, robust weatherproof travel camera with good ergonomics. The Olympus emphasises the "small" angle and Pentax the "ergonomics" angle. Horses for courses.

If it had been released when I was in the market for a new camera I might have looked at it. Personallly, however, I would find it very difficult to work with a camera that did not have a decent optical VF, or at least a built-in EVF of sufficient quality.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
picsnapr
By picsnapr (Mar 2, 2012)

Got to know that this beast hits the shelves on my B'day!
Anyone for my B'day gift?

0 upvotes
SF Photo Gal
By SF Photo Gal (Mar 1, 2012)

I'd rather have a small pocketable add-on flash than a small pocketable add-on EVF. Besides, with the fast lenses you can get with m4/3 I find myself using flash less and less, and when I have to use one, I'll grab a FL36 or 50.

1 upvote
bohemyo
By bohemyo (Feb 28, 2012)

Primary reason for getting this over others is the video ability to focus like a camcorder. It's just I feel uneasy nowadays with bringing a camera of this level without a built-in flash, no matter how weak the flash is.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Feb 29, 2012)

I had the same concerns with other cams that do not have some built-in flash. In my experience any sub-F2 lens does very well indoors or at night, and the result is even more natural than with a flash.

0 upvotes
Stan Powers
By Stan Powers (Feb 26, 2012)

At $1299 with new kit lens - be nice, for those of us with a box of 4/3 lenses, if Oly tossed in the new adaptor for free (like they did with the OMZuiko-to-4/3 adaptor when the E-1 came out). Regardless, I'm in.

1 upvote
jfgroen
By jfgroen (Feb 24, 2012)

That's not fair! When one peforms the test shoot in Amsterdam, all camera's look better. :-)
Now more serious: this looks like the camera I have been waiting for. As I understand the EVF can project a histogram in the viewfinder so one is able to adjust the exposure interactively before taking the picture, a feature I used very often on my Minolta D7, and which I dearly miss on the E330 which I currently own.
For a year or so, I thought Olympus was fading out of existence because they did not seem to be committed to high end cameras. But luckily, they are 'back', with a camera that is a sensbile step forward (yes, I do think that mirrorless cameras are the future for high end photography). And it seems that Panasonic is finally able to get better high ASA performance out of their chips, so I hope that my saving money, and the inevitable drop in street prices will meet each other in the near future.

0 upvotes
jsis
By jsis (Feb 23, 2012)

So, I still don't get it. People are getting this instead of Sony and Canon's low-end offerings. Mirrorless cameras are not exactly pocketable once you start adding the lenses (you're gonna carry a bag anyways). It has all the features and settings in DSLRs.

0 upvotes
RDMPhotos
By RDMPhotos (Feb 23, 2012)

Yes but this compared to a DSLR is a much lighter and smaller kit, with the ability to use 90% of all the camera lenses ever made. Very attractive for someone who already has a large collection of high quality Canon or Minolta Rokkor Lenses, or any other high quality defunct system, and they want to use them on a hight quality versatile camera

4 upvotes
bcalkins
By bcalkins (Feb 24, 2012)

Between Panny's power 14-42mm zoom, 20mm and 14mm primes plus the Oly pancakes you have a very portable option. Even with my GH2 and a pancake lens I can carry it in my coat when skiing... And you get a bunch of features Canon doesn't have - like the EVF for eye level video. If you are going to carry a bag anyways, then I agree there isn't a whole lot to be gained over a light DSLR. Still, I'd much rather fall skiing with a Panasonic 20mm in my coat pocket than my Canon 28mm f/1.8 :)

It is expensive, though, to maintain a whole extra system for portability alone. I think you really have to be making use of the unique features (face detection, EVF, aspect ratio preview, live black and white, more DOF, etc). Another difference is that the higher end MFT bodies are still smaller than the dslrs and offer more direct controls.

It isn't for everyone, naturally...

4 upvotes
flipmac
By flipmac (Feb 25, 2012)

Compare the E-M5 to Canon's weather sealed offering (7D) then tell me the price, size and weight difference. This isn't an entry level mirrorless, so why compare it to an entry level DSLR that doesnt have weather sealing, 9 fps, 100% viewfinder, extensive physical controls, OLED touchscreen, 5 way IBIS, etc.
If you want to compare an m4/3 to an entry level DSLR, then look at E-PM1, GF2, etc., which are around $400. Add an 14-150mm to an E-PM1, and you will not be able to match it's size and price with any Canon/Nikon/Sony 18-200mm on any body.

5 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Feb 29, 2012)

M4/3s are not pocketable and that's exactly why I bought one. They look good on me. With a fast pancake lens and no bag, I am just as much a part of the street scene as the street.

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Mar 5, 2012)

Fuji X Pro 1 for me, I think.

0 upvotes
klopus
By klopus (Feb 22, 2012)

Along with ASP-C Pentax K10D I own still great despite its relative age Pana GF1 with a set of fine glass including truly amazing 20 f1.7. This new Oly E-M5 seems like probably current best in m43 world, almost ideal. But I'm not excited.

My beef is with m43 format itself, namely limited (compared to ASP-C not speaking of FF) DOF control. For my style in many situations I find myself longing for more shallow depth especially with m43 zooms that aren't fast. In terms of DOF f4.5 on m43 is more like f6.3 on ASP-C. Also I can't exactly pin it but GF1 output, even RAW, has this slight P&S-ish look to it. And I attribute it not so much to Pana sensor/processing but to smaller sensor since this look is present on many image sampels I saw from other m43 cameras.

So for myself, no matter how much I admire small size/weight of bodies and lens, I see an end of the road with m43. I'll either will continue solely with ASP-C upgrading to K-5 or maybe will complement it with Fuji X-Pro1.

1 upvote
shutterbobby
By shutterbobby (Feb 23, 2012)

, has this slight P&S-ish look to it. And I attribute it not so much to Pana sensor/processing but to smaller sensor since this look is present on many image sampels I saw from other m43 cameras.

????? My E1 has no P&S look to it whatsoever..with the 14-54 lens for example..Oly has some of the best glass(high end) and now just need the sensor to match it)

0 upvotes
evshrug2
By evshrug2 (Feb 23, 2012)

As per the "point and shoot look," I only have images that feel that way when using extreme ISO settings (meaning limited dynamic range/tonal gradations) or extreme in-camera sharpening. This is true of any camera really... but the µ4/3 and 4/3 sensors have more headroom than a cheap P&S before getting "digital" and flakey, and in normal conditions is capable of high-subtlety results.

2 upvotes
RDMPhotos
By RDMPhotos (Feb 23, 2012)

well your problem is nothing new. Photographers throughout history had this problem with 35mm cameras too, so they switched to a larger format system, they didn't demand the camera company's squeeze larger film in the cameras.. ... although now that i think about it , it would have been kool if one of the companys made an SLR that took 828 film and got an image frame that was a couple mm wider and taller.

1 upvote
TrapperJohn
By TrapperJohn (Feb 22, 2012)

Hmmm... I open the hands on preview, see Andy's name at the top, followed by a photo of someone holding an EM5, and my first thought was... Andy, I didn't think you looked like that.

Haven't been this interested in a new camera for a long time. Rather than agonize over every last little detail, I've ordered one largely on faith. Let's see what it can do.

1 upvote
alfa
By alfa (Feb 23, 2012)

You have to admit, though, he looks good in that dress.

I wonder how many people have pre-ordered and how long people are going to have to wait.

When you do the in-depth, I'd like to know how it does with 4/3 glass. Some of us have loads of it.

1 upvote
RDMPhotos
By RDMPhotos (Feb 23, 2012)

alfa... im guessing they designed it with that in mind, based on the fact there's a new weather proof adapter that works with the Pro 4/3 Zuiko glass

0 upvotes
jamesm007
By jamesm007 (Feb 22, 2012)

Congratulations to Olympus, what a fantastic camera system. Pentax also made a fine move with its K-01. But its lack of a OVF/EVF makes it less fantastic.

In 5 years, probably less, we will see almost all cameras that cost under $1000(USA) a nSLR (no single lens reflex; my term). Nikon, Canon, Pentax will still sell dSLRs but for a higher cost. nSLRs will become very appealing for almost all enthusiasts.

Again great looking camera with a great feature set and at a great price!

2 upvotes
shutterbobby
By shutterbobby (Feb 22, 2012)

Hi Andy--Did you happen to test with the 14-54 I lens? really would like to know if it can focus fairly quick on the E-M5

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 23, 2012)

I didn't get a chance to check this, but we'll aim to look at AF with Four Thirds lenses for our full review.

2 upvotes
Rob Chan
By Rob Chan (Apr 1, 2012)

@shutterbobby:

Hi, how goes? To answer your question, I have personally tested the OM-D with my 14-54mm Mark I during a preview event, and from my observation, there is practically no difference in AF speed with the PEN E-P3. In dim lighting, the AF is really slow, but in good light, it focuses alright (1-2 seconds, give or take). I had better luck with my ZD 25mm pancake, which focuses really quickly even in low light (around 1/2 to 1 second), which I believe is due to it being CDAF compatible.

I'm afraid to say that the OM-D not being able to focus my legacy ZD lenses even at reasonable speeds is the reason why I will be skipping this one out. If you take mostly stills, and have no issues taking your time in getting the pic, it should be no bother to you.

Cheers,

Rob.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
mike051051
By mike051051 (Feb 22, 2012)

If I'm fortunate enough to obtain one of these I'll just call it an "OM-5". Now if you'll excuse me, I feel somewhat like Miles Culperthwaite - anyone seen my bucket?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 22, 2012)

When you guys do the full review, pls check out the video capabilities as well. From the initial specs, those seem to be direly lacking.

0 upvotes
Michele Kappa
By Michele Kappa (Feb 22, 2012)

Dpreview always checks video capabilities of modern cameras in its reviews, as I can see.
Thanks for pointing out to us what you hope they will be in order to keep on trolling, though. :P

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
richarddd
By richarddd (Feb 22, 2012)

_ the camera will attempt to track focus during shooting, and maintains a live view feed between frames in the process: the first Olympus Micro Four Thirds camera to do so. In principle this should help track your subject when panning._

Does it work in practice as well as in principle?

Two criticisms of m43 cameras are blanking the EVF while shooting bursts and not great C-AF. How does the E-M5 do?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 22, 2012)

We'll cover this sort of thing in the full review. It's impossible to assess every feature properly when you only have a few hours with the camera.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
1 upvote
wroclaw
By wroclaw (Feb 22, 2012)

what we see is, it is going to be difficult to get an up to date image image quality with this small sensor. being a seasoned olympus fanboy, i am disappointed with the IQ. the images lack sharpness/resolving power. maybe it was poor photographer skills, camera shake, etc.

but then again, what is the point in showing such technically bad images to the public which is obsessed with IQ, like dpreview.

overall, i am afraid this cam aims for young ladies with small handbags as a buyer.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 22, 2012)

Can you clarify exactly what you mean by 'lack sharpness/resolving power', and precisely which images you're concerned about? In the process do bear in mind that you're considering massively downsampled images (so you actually have no idea what the originals look like in terms of resolution), and that you should disregard anything processed with Art Filters, as these simply aren't about pixel-level IQ.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
20 upvotes
wroclaw
By wroclaw (Feb 22, 2012)

Andy, we both know, than even small internet samples *can* give you an impression of the IQ of the given camera. Think of an internet sample from a hasselbald back and a cell phone, even if small, they will show a difference between them. I simply dont see this IQ here.

For instance: the picture of the college building lacks definition in the cobblestones; James Bond alike, i would expect more detail in his hair; the picture of the model in the "natural" picture mode - i miss detail in her left eyebrow; the 8000 iso image shows probably more camera shake than anything else. Agree, most of the art filters images have a cell phone quality.

I just dont understand why are you showing such images at all, if, as you claim, the original image quality of the camera is much better. These examples tell me the opposite.

May be you could add more info about how did you process the images, what sharpening in camera, what sharpening for web, etc. Or do I miss something?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 22, 2012)

Small internet samples can give you some impression of the IQ of a camera, but it's folly to believe they can tell you anything about the camera's ultimate resolution. It's also, to my mind, odd to be assessing an ISO8000 shot shot for fine detail (especially from Micro Four Thirds), but maybe that's just me. Anyway FYI the samples are out-of-camera JPEGs, shot using default processing settings, and downsampled in Photoshop using Bicubic with no additional sharpening (I'm really not a fan of the aggressive sharpening that seems popular on the web, but feel free to add your own). Overall you're massively over-interpreting these samples - if you want to know what a 16MP Micro Four Thirds sensor can deliver in terms of resolution, I suggest you have a look at some GX1 and G3 samples.

12 upvotes
wroclaw
By wroclaw (Feb 22, 2012)

thanks for an update, but lets forget it. the samples you are showing are bad. i can easily take your word for that, the cam is in reality much better. it'd better to show it though. sorry, but i never wrote anything about seeking the "ultimate" resolution in a 1600px picture, your are massively over-interpreting my posts. :-)

0 upvotes
Michele Kappa
By Michele Kappa (Feb 22, 2012)

Actually I thought the detail in the photo from the train station (no art effects) was very impressive...

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
RichardBalonglong
By RichardBalonglong (Feb 22, 2012)

@ wroclaw: I don't know what you see through your computer screen, but on my screen the images are just fine and sharp even when downsized to 1600px at the long end. And, it doesn't mean that if it's a small cam and it's for the young ladies with small handbags. There's an advantage from small cameras like this new Olympus (mind you I'm not an Olympus fan), it's light, reliable image quality, fast, AND weather sealed. I too have those big bulky heavy DSLRs, but sometimes I (and for many others too) needed a small, light, and reliable substitute camera to bring along during assignments or everyday shooting.

4 upvotes
wroclaw
By wroclaw (Feb 22, 2012)

richard, thats exactly why i am looking into this cam. i will stay tuned - so fed up with carrying around those big & heavy ones, too.

0 upvotes
Imajez
By Imajez (Feb 22, 2012)

"the samples are out-of-camera JPEGs, and downsampled in Photoshop using Bicubic with no additional sharpening (I'm really not a fan of the aggressive sharpening that seems popular on the web)."

Andy - No wonder they are a bit soft. Just because some people overcook the sharpening, doesn't mean you should avoid doing any sharpening when resizing. I have several complex PS actions for sharpening images that are set up with different strengths, depending on the resize done and images usually look much better as a result. Though most of the time I use LR for exporting images to the web and LR has some very clever sharpening built in which takes into account the amount of file size change.
Though I've discovered that I do need to alter the amount of export sharpen to 'low' on some images as the content management software on my website can be a bit harsh when resizing certain image types a second time to suit output device size [size on server is set to be within 2000x1200px size].

0 upvotes
evshrug2
By evshrug2 (Feb 23, 2012)

@ wroclaw,
Your opinion may start a flame war, but I doubt it will change the minds of others because of the subjective bashing of the photographer and reviewer and the lack of non-subjective comparisons and reasoning about image quality. All that said, though, I hope you find some things in your hobbies and interests that satisfy you.

0 upvotes
camirisk1
By camirisk1 (Feb 24, 2012)

I think that the real point is that this camera allows you to get back to the "art of photography" the samples look quite good and sometimes I feel that some people will like to have the resolution and "IQ" of a 200MP hasselblad is just silly to continue bashing m4/3 cameras for not giving the perfection that the eye perceive in the real world, for me photography is the art of interpreting the world and not the analysis about the capacity of the sensor, the memory, etc, I still remember the effects that films like ilford B&W or TMAX gave you, and they had IQ and resolution, but you had to work around them and use them in your favor to get the photo that you wanted, so the real problem is how to use the camera (with its pros and cons which I am sure it has) and then project the image that you want the world to see, the samples presented here, gave me the idea of what the camera offers and what it will add to my currently poor photo skills

0 upvotes
laquila65
By laquila65 (Feb 28, 2012)

I absolutely agree that the sample pictures are plain bad. Downsampling has nothing to do with it. The pictures look very bland and very flat. The colors are also flat. The are not off, but in reality colors don't look that boring. I don't like it a single bit.

0 upvotes
aris14
By aris14 (Feb 22, 2012)

oops... my post disappeared...

0 upvotes
cxsparc
By cxsparc (Feb 22, 2012)

Is there any understanable reason why the ISO8000 (?) picture does not contain any EXIF info? Using such a high ISO for this shot should result in very short shutter speeds.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 22, 2012)

None of the images contain any EXIF information - that was part of Olympus's conditions for publication. The shutter speed was 1/60sec - not exactly 'very short'.

0 upvotes
snake_b
By snake_b (Feb 22, 2012)

I'm still fascinated with the slow zooms on these mirrorless cams and how people are frothing over them. This 12-50 is supposed to be the replacement for the 4/3 12-60? Really?

2 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Feb 22, 2012)

I don't think it is a replacement for the considerably faster 12-60, but they always release these cameras with slow zooms first for several reasons, one is that the general public will be impressed by the small size, not knowing that faster lenses will quickly increase the size and the weight. Another reason is that the general public will not need faster and more expensive lenses, those lenses are too special to be attractive for the average Joe. A third reason is that faster and larger lenses may focus slower because of the weight and obviously Olympus is claiming to have the fastest AF speed again, so they need slow lens to proof that, since slow lenses hide focus errors better. On the other hand, Nikon has at least two zooms, one is a real tele and the V1 is extremely fast with both the 10-30 and the 30-110. I doubt Olympus measured the OMD/12-50 combo against the Nikon V1, but it doesn't really matter.

2 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 22, 2012)

People are frothing over the E-M5, and this just happens to be the kit lens. Which does the job and completes the weather sealing. But frothing ? Then you're just making things up.

1 upvote
digifan
By digifan (Feb 22, 2012)

@ Olyflyer.
E-M5 is faster than J1/V1 with dedicated lenses in SAF.
Now J1/V1 is faster with DX lenses using PDAF in CAF.

@ snake_b
The 12-50mm is NOT the replacement for the 4/3rds 12-60mm lens.
The 12-50mm is just a kit lens with a longer and wider view. I think it's great, it's the first weathersealed lens on the micro format and being able to use it outdoors with a more extended reach than the 14-42 is a bonus.
The faster ones will come later any way.
It's allways been like that exept when the E-1 was released.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 22, 2012)

This toy kit lens can only open up to f6.3 at 50mm focal length. Correct? Then if you drop to f11, you will have other types of issues to contend with. Does not exactly give you a wide range of shooting at 50mm focal length or thereabouts, does it?

If they don't charge anything extra for it when you get the camera, that's one thing. But actually PAYING something for a lens this dark? In the year 2012? Why?

0 upvotes
Michele Kappa
By Michele Kappa (Feb 22, 2012)

This "toy kit" lens is an Olympus lens - please google on the quality of these lenses; but, unrelatedly, Francis, do you EVER do any constructive criticism on ANYTHING you post?
Seems to me that all you do is troll away...

8 upvotes
krugorg
By krugorg (Feb 22, 2012)

LoL, I don't see anyone frothing over the kit lens... people just excited about the OM-D and don't mind having a weather-sealed zoom option.

1 upvote
safedchuha
By safedchuha (Feb 22, 2012)

Can I just point out, in my experience with Zuiko lenses, at least you can reliably use them wide open. I agree with this lamentation and hope the above speculation that faster lenses are coming is true for this has kept me away from m4/3rds so far.
Still, I just want to emphasize that on many other systems, the kit lenses perform poorly wide open and only start to deliver sharp images stopped down. Zuiko lenses are spec'd more conservatively and do what they say across the f-stop range. (Just check out DPREVIEWS reviews)

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Feb 23, 2012)

@ olyflyer.... and here's another reason. A fast zoom lens would cost twice as much, and drive the price of the kit up to $1800.

Kit lenses, by definition, are cheap lenses. The upgrade lenses are better, and faster, but cost a lot more. Eventually, you will probably see a $1,000 upgrade fast normal zoom. Which is around what the 12-60mm lens costs today.

0 upvotes
powerbook duo
By powerbook duo (Feb 22, 2012)

The model's makeup on the first page shot really looks 'cakey' and unprofessional, but perhaps the camera's resolving power was too great, the same shoot looks okay in the soft focus shot of course but in the other 'natural' picture mode the makeup and blemishes is still all too visible.

Organizing a model for journos to shoot for camera launch might be novel but perhaps Olympus should have chosen a better makeup artist or model considering the resulting shots, unlike a real fashion shoots will be posted on review websites unmolested by Photoshop. But again, I can't help but think that the camera&lens must be pretty good for all that to show up even in compressed jpeg on my low-res computer screen

1 upvote
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Feb 22, 2012)

I agree with you, but I don't think that image is intended to be used in a fashion magazine. In fact, it is a pretty amateurish picture, but I suppose the photographer wanted to mimic a 70's look, a bit yellowish/orange tone, like a bleached out colour picture from the 70's. The only problem is that there is too much detail for the real 70's look.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
match14
By match14 (Feb 22, 2012)

@Andy Westlake which lenses were the samples in this article taken with? Did you try the new 12-50mm, what were your impressions of that lens?

Thanks.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 49 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 22, 2012)

Lenses used were the 45mm F1.8 (mainly for the portraits), and the 12-50mm powerzoom. It's an impressively versatile lens, with a good zoom range and macro capability, and the powerzoom works pretty well, but I didn't really stress it to see how good the optics are.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 22, 2012)

This lens has an app. 4x zooming range -- why exactly would that be impressive or versatile these days? At only 50mm focal length, this lens can only open up to an an aperture of f6.3. I assume that is also something "impressive" and "versatile?'

Can you also adjust focal length manually with the zoom ring? Or will zooming always be by the built-in servo motor, like in the absolutely cheapest P&S camera lenses?

0 upvotes
Antony John
By Antony John (Feb 22, 2012)

Francis, Olympus probably could produce an excellent F1.0, 10 to 1000 mm lens which may satisfy your 'versatility' requirement.
Then again it would be extremely cumbersome, large and weighty and would need something lequally large and extaordinary to support it - your ego perhaps?

8 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Feb 22, 2012)

@Francis Carver: what you seem to have missed here is that 'versatile' isn't defined purely by focal length and aperture range (although you'll struggle to find another weathersealed kit zoom with this range for anything like the price). The 12-50mm also has impressive macro capability, and an interesting powerzoom implementation that does a reasonable job of mimicing a conventional zoom in one mode, while providing near-silent powerzoom for movie use in the other.

3 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Feb 22, 2012)

I think that, after reading all the previews, this camera will be the most successful of all mirrorless in 2012, provided there are no surprises in the QC. It should get a couple of Camera of The Year Awards. Any flaws seem very minor and cannot distract from the fact that this camera gets all the important things right for a small capable camera.

I wish Olympus will start releasing black versions and/or silver (same colour as the silver on the E-M5) versions of their lenses, replacing those other non-standard "silver" colours, since this is their flagship camera and it look fantastic (except for the mismatched silver colours and silver lenses do not look so good on all black cameras).

I think this will be the start of a distinct line of cameras that Olympus and its owners will be so proud of, just like the OM-1, 2, etc.

I hope this will save Olympus and free it from the beancounters style of management and it will continue to produce OM-D cameras that excites. Thank you.

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
DaveMarx
By DaveMarx (Feb 22, 2012)

Perhaps the camera will be the success you predict. Unfortunately, Oly's entire Imaging Systems division brings in just 16% of the company's revenues, but currently runs at a loss (all these product development costs to absorb). If the company's going down, a camera may help save it, but not for the reason you may imagine.

A wildly successful camera will make the imaging division a more attractive sale/acquisition target - a quick infusion of cash to help float the remaining businesses. This brings us back to the rumors of Sony's interest in a partnership/acquisition.

Unfortunately, the first move of any acquirer is to send in the bean counters. And if interest by Sony worries Panasonic? We may have a bidding war which, when the dust clears, leaves the bean counters in even stronger control.

Your best hope for Oly's survival as a creative, independent camera maker is if the rest of the company can survive with zero help from Imaging Systems.

4 upvotes
Ehrik
By Ehrik (Feb 27, 2012)

I'd guess the loss is in the highly competitive compact camera section, rather than with the EVIL cameras where people are willing to pay twice as much compared to a standard 4/3rds lens of similar size. Maybe there's also a loss counted on the standard 4/3 inventory which is probably hard to sell now without a big discount.

0 upvotes
ingram98ab
By ingram98ab (Feb 22, 2012)

Nobody seems surprised that Daniel Craig appeared in the samples... is he a regular in DPreview's Hands-on reviews??? Or photographers just dont care??

1 upvote
jeerzz
By jeerzz (Feb 22, 2012)

you dont say

1 upvote
alffastar
By alffastar (Feb 22, 2012)

That's not Daniel Craig :) Daniel Craig is in much better shape than this guy, which is quite normal, keeping in mind he is shooting next Bond.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
calmwaters
By calmwaters (Feb 22, 2012)

That is not even close to Daniel Craig.

1 upvote
Catalin Stavaru
By Catalin Stavaru (Feb 22, 2012)

I don't think that is Daniel Craig.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 22, 2012)

It's Roger Moore, folks!!

Seriously now... the only 007 I know of who had ever shown up in Amsterdam was S. Connery in 1971's 'Diamonds Are Forever."

0 upvotes
morepix
By morepix (Feb 22, 2012)

I had no idea Andy Westlake was so pretty. From now on, when (s)he speaks, I listen!

1 upvote
mjkerpan
By mjkerpan (Feb 22, 2012)

Assuming Olympus can manage to stay alive and not get assimilated by some other company that will kill their camera line, they look to have a real winner here.

0 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Feb 22, 2012)

so no tracking result.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 22, 2012)

naked marketing

0 upvotes
Murka
By Murka (Feb 22, 2012)

Tive uma OM 1 há muitos anos. Depois uma E 400.
E agora quero uma destas....já !

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 22, 2012)

Extremely impressive. I very much like the design and ergonomics.

And the OM-D E-M5 itself is not bad either, but the name is really unattractive. Can't believe nobody said "hey guys, shouldn't we use a catchier name, something that looks and sounds less like a chemical formula"?

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Feb 22, 2012)

Well PEN E-P3 isn't very catchy, either.

I think most people will tend to drop the OM-D family name and just call it an E-M5 once the family is better established.

5 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Feb 22, 2012)

Just call it the E-M5. That's the actual model name. The OM-D refers to this line of cameras, just like PEN refers to that line of cameras. For example, future additions to the OM-D family will probably be the model E-M6, model E-M7, model E-M8, and so on.

0 upvotes
Doug
By Doug (Feb 22, 2012)

Funny how no one mentions the band.... OMD... that is what I think of when I see this model name... I can't seem to remember the E-M5 part...

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Willgo
By Willgo (Feb 22, 2012)

Yeah, it needs a G or an X or a 1 in the title, or preferably all three in some random combination

6 upvotes
Michele Kappa
By Michele Kappa (Feb 22, 2012)

Behold, the new GSXR...
oh wait, that's a Suzuki.

0 upvotes
steveh0607
By steveh0607 (Feb 22, 2012)

LOL...Exactly!! Why not just call it the OM-D1. Is that too simple?

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Feb 28, 2012)

It needs "pro" in the name. Like having an account on Flickr.

0 upvotes
David247
By David247 (Feb 22, 2012)

Olympus may have won me back. Looks to be a home-run for them. Now the only problem is how to come up with money to get one. This camera with the 12mm F2 (or maybe even panny 7-14), 12-50 for general non demand shooting and the either the 45 1.8 or new 60mm F2.8 Macro would make for a very nice but compact kit, at a weight range I could tolerate.

3 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 22, 2012)

The color are nice under an overcast but the ISO 8000 image are not very impressive. Even down-sampled the noise are blotchy.

I also don't understand why the camera is still at version 0.95 when D800 with finalized firmware has been in the hand of pro shooters for the past few months. It seems like D800 will hit the ground shooting while E-M5 will spend a few months getting through its teething period before version 1.01.

1 upvote
abortabort
By abortabort (Feb 22, 2012)

What the hell does the D800 have to do with the OM-D? And why does everyone bring up the D800 when any other new camera is mentioned? Are you seriously tossing up between this and a D800? If not, why mention it...

Moments later on DPR - Canon release new entry level P&S, commenters: 'How are Canon going to compete with the D800 with that?! Canon FAIL'

16 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 22, 2012)

Both camera were announced a day from each other with shipping date a month apart. The level of commitment by the companies to their products and photographers are what I am using to evaluate the company's standing.

Nikon talked straight to the market and we know pretty much everything about D800. D800 have been in hands of many pro and tested with final firmware.

Olympus has been playing a game of cat and mouse. They go back and forth on the sensor manufacturer. They drop hints of future 4/3 camera. They won't make clear E-M5's standing in the OM-D range. And they have websites posting shots with art filters and unfinished firmware.

This all looks to be an attempt at obfuscate. From their BoD down to marketing department, I am not surprised.

I like Olympus and was seriously thinking of 4/3 when getting my first DSLR because I have been shooting with an Olympus bridge. I went Nikon for safety and I was right. This company doesn't care much about supporting their customer base.

4 upvotes
Parmmm
By Parmmm (Feb 22, 2012)

Well by the same argument if hasselblad or leaf brought out a new product we should start comparing to D800.

The places where D800 scores over medium format is the same space where EM5 scores over the D800. Size, convenience, price, joy to use over extended periods, easy on the wallet and sholder.

6 upvotes
safeashouses
By safeashouses (Feb 22, 2012)

@Peiasdf "I went Nikon for safety..." That's all I needed to hear, I mean that's all you needed to say.

7 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Feb 22, 2012)

@Peiasdf

It is asinine to compare two entirely different systems. Went with Nikon for safety? You mean you bought that joke of a Nikon 1 mirrorless system they just came out with. Cause that was their feeble attempt to competing in the compact segment.

3 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 22, 2012)

@Parmmm
If hasselblad or leaf come out with a new system and cut off all support to their medium system, I would complaint about their lack of commitment as well.

If you have noticed, I am comparing about Olympus and Nikon not E-M5 and D800. Nikon just care more about its product and customers.

@safeashouses
F mount has been around since 1959 with 65 million lenses produced by Nikon alone. 4/3 system has been around from 2003 to 2010. Nuff said.

@ilariths
Notice I was shopping for DSLR. Mirrorless/EVIL wasn't around back then. I picked D90 over E-30. What a great choice. I also have an E-PL2 so I know hands on how expensive m4/3 lenses and bodies are.

1 upvote
Peter MG
By Peter MG (Feb 23, 2012)

@Peiasdf

You forget many of those lens are completely inadequate for today's high resolution sensors and that Nikon removed the ability of many of their early autofocus lenses from auto focusing when removing the in camera autofocus motors. Real commitment there.

Bottom line is all kit eventually becomes obsolete and things move on. You have been taken in by propaganda.

1 upvote
Michael_13
By Michael_13 (Feb 23, 2012)

Peiasdf, yes, Nikon may be on schedule with their new product release, but why do you compare them to Olympus? The latter is much smaller. Yes, it is sad that they cannot release a new E-System every year, but they still offer more innovation than the big brands. Do you really want to blame them for putting their R&D money where the market is?
The SLR market is shrinking and I really hope that Oly will gain market share from Pros around the world who seek for a light and durable system.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 22, 2012)

Are you at the next Bond film set?

0 upvotes
88SAL
By 88SAL (Feb 22, 2012)

Wasnt Bond axed to pay for another film? Avatar was it?

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 22, 2012)

The next Bond film, Skyfall, has release date of November 9, 2012. The preview shots are very Bond inspired.

0 upvotes
love_them_all
By love_them_all (Feb 22, 2012)

For the first time I would consider buying a m4/3 because of this camera. I just love the classic OM design. May be they will do a Titaninum ver in the future?

3 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Feb 22, 2012)

I can't wait for the $10000 hand-polished Wood edition.

4 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Feb 22, 2012)

consider $1M Diamond edition. Wood doen't worth $10000.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Feb 22, 2012)

Snake skin or ostrich leather front grips.

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Feb 23, 2012)

If Olympus had the same sort of status as Leica... they could grind out $20,000 special editions of the EM-5. Safari Edition... Titanium Edition... perhaps even a Luftwaffe Commemorative Edition?

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Feb 22, 2012)

Thanks for the writeups. One wonders why it took so long to get to such an appealing form factor for a larger sensor digital camera. I guess EVF development was a factor and, maybe, manufacturers are finally listening-creating cameras as well as electronic devices. Only negatives, these are coming in at premium price points and Canon, Nikon haven't joined suit. The closest existing camera, in my mind, would be the Samsung NX10/NX11, albeit a somewhat larger sensor.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Glen Barrington
By Glen Barrington (Feb 22, 2012)

"A few months away from being finished" sounds suspiciously like, "They've run out of money and we don't know when it will be available" to me. I'm done with new Olympus gear.

2 upvotes
flipmac
By flipmac (Feb 22, 2012)

Seriously? Why so pessimistic?

Most likely, Olympus is working on finalizing the firmware and tweaking some hardware component here and there. That's common.

Or, would you rather have the company rush it out and have a buggy product?

That said, I'd like to see one and try one out in a store.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
Parmmm
By Parmmm (Feb 22, 2012)

I do not think that is the case with Oly, it may be with Pana.

All thru all that has happened in the past years Oly has always brought out innovative products and brought them to the market when promised!

1 upvote
safeashouses
By safeashouses (Feb 22, 2012)

Are you done enough to stop telling all of us about every time Olympus comes out with a new camera? Not that done!?!

0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Feb 22, 2012)

They have already said it comes up mid April this year..

0 upvotes
dustybunter
By dustybunter (Feb 22, 2012)

This will sell well for Olympus.

4 upvotes
Andre Oliveira
By Andre Oliveira (Feb 22, 2012)

Seems to be a great camera but the model is very good indeed. I could dispense with the camera but it would hurt me to pass the lady.

0 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (Feb 22, 2012)

Nice sample pics. Thanks for the report.

0 upvotes
razorfish
By razorfish (Feb 22, 2012)

We need a constant f2 standard zoom now! It must be done!

5 upvotes
spidermoon
By spidermoon (Feb 22, 2012)

It's never happens, µ4/3 is all about smal size, with slow small zoom or fast and thin pancake.

0 upvotes
klopus
By klopus (Feb 22, 2012)

How many f2 (not f2.8!) standard (e.g. 28-80mm in 35mm terms) zooms do you know? And even if there are few obscure ones how much do they cost and weigh?

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
BJN
By BJN (Feb 22, 2012)

The "action" sequence doesn't pose much of a challenge. The subject's motion with respect to the camera is slight. What happens when you have a fast-moving subject that's moving toward, away from, or rapidly across the field of view?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Feb 22, 2012)

Given that it's a demonstration of a mode that is explained to have fixed focus and exposure, I suspect the the subject would begin to drop out of focus.

12 upvotes
David247
By David247 (Feb 22, 2012)

And you can get continuos autofocus at 4.2 FPS, or get a high end DSLR with more weight and cost if you need more then that. This is excellent performance within this camera spectrum.

7 upvotes
SteveNunez
By SteveNunez (Feb 21, 2012)

No word on video capabilities...looks like a good match for the NEX 7 but no mention of video capabilities have me questioning........is their a live HDMI out, or mic in jack?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Feb 22, 2012)

There's no mic in jack, as has been said several times, but you can add one (around $69) to the accessory port.

2 upvotes
sadwitch
By sadwitch (Feb 21, 2012)

The more i see the more i think OMD rocks. It's like the coming of age for micro43 camera. I'm so gonna get one if i have the dough.

10 upvotes
Michele Kappa
By Michele Kappa (Feb 22, 2012)

"when" I have the dough... :D

0 upvotes
Optical1
By Optical1 (Feb 22, 2012)

While it's difficult to scratch up more dough, it's easy to accumulate more debt!!! 1300 airline miles, here I come!!!

2 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Feb 21, 2012)

Great area to test a new Olympus camera....Amsterdam

Did it pass the coffeeshop test as well? :-P

1 upvote
intruder61
By intruder61 (Feb 21, 2012)

the Japanese CEO's love Amsterdam :))

3 upvotes
Total comments: 215
12