Photokina 2012: Interview - Sun Hong Lim of Samsung

In a year when Samsung refreshed its entire lineup of NX interchangeable lens cameras, adding WiFi functionality, the star of the Korean manufacturer's stand at this year's Photokina is the brand new Galaxy Camera. The closest thing yet to a camera/smartphone hybrid device, the Galaxy Camera offers the photographic capabilities of the WB850F compact camera combined with the operating system and processing power of the Galaxy SIII smartphone, along with WiFi and 3G / 4G connectivity. (Note though that it's not actually a cellphone, although in principle it can be used for Skype.)

Barnaby Britton caught up with Samsung's VP of Sales and Marketing, Sun Hong Lim at the stand, who explained why the Galaxy Camera is so important to Samsung, and why the Korean manufacturer is confident that it's a leader - not a follower. This is a follow-up to an earlier interview, published in March, prior to the release of the Galaxy Camera. 


Mr Lim, something that a lot of people are asking us, is when they can buy the new Galaxy Camera, and how much it will cost?

The camera will be available in the fourth quarter of this year - the middle of the fourth quarter. Price is not fixed yet, discussions are ongoing with the major operators (phone carriers) and the price depends on many factors. It depends on the discussions we're having but we're trying to make it affordable to everybody.

Now that you've announced the Galaxy Camera, what do you think of the competition - Nikon's Android camera, the S800C?

I don't think of it as competition. It is totally different.

So what makes your camera unique?

We combined the best bits of a smartphone with the best bits of a compact camera together. This is not just a combination of two devices though, this is a new device, which is why we're positioning it as a camera. It's just a totally new type of camera. As you can see when you pick it up, the user interface is totally different [to a conventional compact].

We have several options - for the amateur photographers there are auto modes but if you're an expert we have an option where you can easily manipulate all of the features and functions. So we've tried to satisfy the amateur groups, and the expert groups, at the same time. This is the beauty of this device.

The unique Samsung Galaxy Camera is a full-strength Android device, with full-on camera functionality. Both elements appear to mesh reasonably well (we've only handled pre-production units) but it's bigger than you might think. Here you can see the Android home screen. From the back, the Galaxy Camera looks extremely similar to the Galaxy SIII smartphone.

You've worked with the mobile phone division closely, I imagine, in creating this camera. Can you describe that process?

This is very cross-divisional work. We have the best team in the world for wireless technology, within Samsung, and also we have the imaging division. So we put the best of the engineers and developers together, to make the best possible device.

So this product is the result of the efforts of these two divisions, together. But not only these divisions actually, all divisions within Samsung worked closely together to create this device.

Is there a lot of shared technology between this camera and the Galaxy SIII smartphone?

Yes. The quad-core processor inside the Galaxy Camera for example is exactly the same as the Galaxy SIII.

When we spoke in Korea in the spring, you said that you thought that in the future, a non-connected camera would be meaningless. Do you still think that?

Definitely. Already we are living in the cloud era. You can save your photos in the cloud and those photos can be shared with family and friends very easily. We can share photographs in different cities, at the same time. This is a new benefit to consumers. All devices, TVs, PCs, smartphones and cameras can be connected, so you can enjoy the same content. Connectivity is the keyword for the coming years. So [the Galaxy Camera] is the perfect device.

What is the next step?

The consumer wants more and more, so we plan to expand innovative products like the Galaxy Camera.

Are you still putting energy and investment into lower-cost compact cameras, or are you focussing on the higher-end?

To be honest, the low-end compact camera segment will shrink, because of competition from smartphones, so I'm not really interested in that segment. We want to keep on upgrading our technology and we're going to grow. Without growth there is no future. We want to make the imaging industry bigger and bigger, so everyone can innovate together. By introducing new and innovative technology.

When you were planning the Galaxy Camera, what market research did you do?

We used a couple of research methods. We interviewed our target consumers, we were monitoring the habits of users of social network users, and also we were watching the smartphone market as well. Smartphones are growing very fast, and this has influenced not just the telecom industry, but all other sectors as well.

Because this is a perfect type of device for connectedness. You cannot leave the house without a smartphone today. Even 2-3 years ago we could not have predicted this kind of new way of living. But during the last couple of years smartphones have changed our lives a lot. So this brings us new ideas. That's why we analyze smartphone users and technology, and mobile internet technology [in coming up with devices like the Galaxy Camera].

Samsung's Galaxy Camera, and the current NX range of ILCs is intended to fit into a connected 'ecosystem'. The new NX1000 (pictured) makes sharing very easy thanks to a direct Wi-Fi button on the camera's top plate, which initiates a menu for sharing with one touch.

Are you worried that your NX models might appear a little old-fashioned by comparison?

Absolutely! We suspect that once you use the Galaxy Camera you won't be able to go back to a conventional camera. If you use a smartphone, could you go back to an older feature phone? Once you experience the future you cannot go back to the past. 

Is the new technology that you've used in the Galaxy Camera going to end up in your more serious camera models?

We have studied this, and if there is a demand for this technology in higher-end cameras, then we should definitely try to meet it. This is our future. For the time being though, we're going to focus on this model, that's our first step. Then we can expand gradually.

You have Wi-Fi in your new NX models, what has the response been to this function?

Our users really appreciate this option. We have made our own surveys, and they are telling us that the Wi-Fi connectivity is one of the three main reasons why they buy NX. The other two are the high-quality sensors and the functionality.

How many of your users are taking advantage of the Wi-Fi connectivity in your current cameras?

I'd love to have that data but it's very difficult to get hold of. But according to our own survey, more than 50% of the users of Wi-Fi model owners use the function.

This new camera has more processing power than any other equivalent compact. Does this power have any positive impact on the camera as a photographic, as opposed to a connected device?

The image processing time is much faster than other cameras. Capture is one thing, but also image editing - you can download applications for editing images quickly, and share images immediately. The camera's powerful processor is useful for this. Also, because this is an Android device, we can update the firmware wirelessly. The device is intended to be connected 24 hours a day, so we can do real-time upgrades. The camera is an evolving creation, compared to a more conventional model.

What was the hardest thing about creating the Galaxy Camera?

The software. It takes a lot of time and effort to optimize the hardware and software to work together and this was the first time we'd done it. The first time is always a big challenge. But the next model will be much easier.

Are you confident that you can compete in the future?

Absolutely. We are a vertically-integrated company - we make lenses, sensors, displays… but also one of our strengths is in horizontal integration. We manufacture many different types of devices, cameras, smartphones, tablets, televisions and even home appliances. All of these products can be integrated when it comes to sharing content and services. Here we have a competitive edge compared to most other companies.

As a company we're the number one provider of mobile technology, and we are far ahead of any other company in this industry when it comes to wireless and 3G/4G technology, we've got the most IP of any company in the industry, so there's no doubt that we're leading. Other companies are introducing Wi-Fi in their new models now, they're just following us.

There's a lot of technology in the Galaxy Camera. Even for a vertically-integrated company like Samsung, it must be very expensive to produce. How do you reduce the cost for the consumer?

You must consider the business model when it comes to selling products like this. We have close relationships with mobile operators, which other companies don't have. That's another source of our competitiveness. We can develop new business models with these operators around the world. It will be another big hurdle for other camera manufacturers, who don't have those relationships. 


See also:

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Comments

Total comments: 100
migus
By migus (Sep 28, 2012)

Mr. Sun Hong Lim of Samsung does not represent IMO the NX line, not even Samsung's camera division at large. He's marketing one class of new products targeted at one market segment, only - however important and trendy that may be.

Compared to the Sony, Nikon etc. reps here, Mr. Sun Hong Lim is not doing a service to the Samsung that this audience is mainly interested in. Photokina is not CES or CeBIT. I'm sure that Mr. Sun Hong Lim is very competent in his field, yet unfortunately that doesn't seem to be photography.

0 upvotes
Gregm61
By Gregm61 (Sep 25, 2012)

Who would invest in their mirrorless system and after reading this interview!

It's already in the past, according to Samsung.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 25, 2012)

Because the NX system, the lenses, in particular are really good. The lenses put Sony Nex system lenses to shame. And certainly compete with Fuji X system lenses.

This is a marketing guy pushing one idea, anyone can read that.

0 upvotes
What do I know
By What do I know (Oct 1, 2012)

And that is why the Sony NEX is the top selling mirrorless system in Korea? and with the Sony and Fuji line now just getting new updated lenses from Zeiss, Samsung does not have any edge with lenses sorry, they don't even have any PZ lenses

Comment edited 5 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
1 upvote
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Sep 25, 2012)

Just a week ago I made no-go decision on Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. Technically it makes a great and not only travel but a very personal system: Wi-Fi or 3G doing the talking, two cams, built-in pen for a creative touch, GPS -- well, everything.

What stopped me was the apparent technology-cost tradeoffs of Samsung marketing. The display was not IPS, the resolution a bit low for a 10" display and, well, no Gorilla glass. I hate to think that if an American company comes up with something revolutionary -- in this case Corning Glass -- that a cheap "just as good" knockoff is deployed by Samsung. Straight away they are in the same bag as the Chinese.

This pad was intended for a kid and the color-changing or fading aspects are not acceptable. The kid's eyes are developing and color/resolution/smoothness (I would not have a kid put on 3D glasses) is exceptionally important.

I own but one Samsung and one Apple product (no Corning stock), and I think the pad is close to the one-only thing.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 25, 2012)

Colour ink, paint, and dyes on paper, canvas, etc often fade.

With this new Samsung Galaxy 10.1 (with pen) one can change the battery, unlike with the iPad.

Android tablets have the big advantage of removable microsd cards.

Yes you can put something like a Zagg screen protector on the Galaxy and still use the touch interface.

At least the Google Android applications store can be readily searched.

So what's better about the iPad? Resolution, not the same a colour, the iOS is somewhat better thought out than Android 4.1. The iTunes library system is good, though not sound quality. Probably battery life is better with on the iPad.

And with Android, like a normal computer, one can download files that the system can't immediately use--like downloading Mac software on to a Windows machine. The iPad can't do that, act as file storage for files or programs you'll use on a different OS, or open with a non iPad application.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Sep 25, 2012)

RAW, I looked but did not consider iPod as an alternative and likely never will (the Emperor has no clothes). I'll look at the Asus Tranformer Infinity because it has IPS screen. What the Samsung guy should have said is once you lay your eyes on the IPS colors you'll never want anything else.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 25, 2012)

OneGuy--

Wait until you can get tablet or computer or TV with an AMOLED screen then. And yes Samsung has that technology.

0 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Sep 26, 2012)

Samsung has been selling the Galaxy Tab 7.7 with an AMOLED screen since early in the year, though they have sold very few of them. The problem is it costs upwards of $400, when you can get an excellent 7" tablet for $250, in particular the Nexus 7 I'm typing this on. Or Samsung's conventional Galaxy Tab 2 7. Also, not all Android tablets have microSD slots. I wish the Nexus did, but it's a super tablet in every other way, if 7" suits you. It does me, as I can hold it like a book and the 1280x800 screen is a great shape for video. Not quite 'Retina' pixel density, but high enough to get a very smooth picture. I had tried the Samsung tablets and they seemed a lot laggier than the Nexus.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 26, 2012)

MarkInSF:

I've never seen the Galaxy Tab 7.7 advertised for sale in the US. Doesn't mean it doesn't exist. (Though doesn't jump out after an AmazonUSA search.)

To make Samsung Tablets running Android 4.xx faster, one needs to go into "developer options" and only allow start up of 1 or 2 background programs. Sort of like killing crapware on a Windows machine by going into System Config, or more like temporarily shutting down crapware in the System Tray.

Nope, the Google Nexus doesn't have a microsd card, and that's a big omission. Really stupid of Google, Barnes and Noble's Nook Tablet didn't make that mistake.

Samsung also makes really nice full Windows 7 tablets that sell for $1,000--$1,300 much better than the silly iPad, and they run real programs--though not AMOLED yet and only have the 3000 series Intel video card.

0 upvotes
gasdive
By gasdive (Sep 23, 2012)

I'd like to see this come from the other end. When I travel I want my Canon 5D2 with me to take amazing pictures, but I hate having to lug a laptop and 2 or three external drives for backup. My Canon has a display, sensor, lens, speaker, microphone and a computer. I should be able to skype home, edit photos, upload to offline storage or my home server all from one amazing imaging/computing device. When I walk into my house, my 5d2 should contact my laptop on my desk with bluetooth and upload any recent photos while I get dinner or get some sleep. None of these things are buck rogers stuff. They all exist, just not on great cameras.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 24, 2012)

There are newish mirrorless APSC cameras with WiFi, not limited to the Samsung NX series.

Use one of those if wireless upload to where ever is really important to you. The good NX lenses easily match the colour and sharpness of Canon Ls.

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Sep 27, 2012)

That's an interesting (to Canikon) path to justify the bulk of an dSLR: Expose its computer functionality to the user! Why not?

OTOH, arguably you could shoot the same amazing pictures w/o hauling 3-15lbs of expensive glass and plastic/metall. RX1 does probably better in noise and DR in one pound; then you have Fuji's X-series, and NX and NEX, hopefully soon also a FF NEX w/ the same computer functions as the 6D/D600.

0 upvotes
shuutrr
By shuutrr (Sep 23, 2012)

This idea makes total sense, IMO....cameras offer a broad spectrum of purpose....I use my NX10/30mm practically everyday while working....generally, I turn the mp down to 2, take numerous 'work" photos and send them to various people who are not "on site"...I have used smart phones, in the past, but the NX10, while still "pocket-able" provides almost infinite photo capabilities, compared to a smart phone.....the only caveat with the NX10, is cabling to my laptop, transferring the photos and attaching them to an email, this process is time consuming....in my case, this idea is perfect, you are holding an "eye" in your pocket, you can open the eye for others to view, by just manipulating a few buttons....a photo can move the topic from subjective to objective....which, in my case, is often critical....I don't expect the NX10 to match a $3000 Canon, my phone is a 4 yr old Blackberry, that has been kicked, tossed, dropped, even into puddles, brought back from dead, etc., it works...

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Sep 22, 2012)

But this isn't even a phone.

From the looks of it, this is a small Galaxy tablet that just happens to have a much better lens.

0 upvotes
Jimmy Drew
By Jimmy Drew (Sep 22, 2012)

The concept is wrong...yes, a S 3 phone with a great camera is the answer. I have been a Samsung fan until I learned that they made DLP LED TV's that they promised would last forever but after 5 years...because of a defective part and are failing to stand behind it. A multi billion dollar company not standing behind their product...I will never own another Samsung Product. C'mon Samsung....stand behind what you build....

Jimmy Drew

0 upvotes
Alexramos
By Alexramos (Sep 21, 2012)

I think one of the main problem with this kind o products are the carriers.
In the same way when the first Galaxy Tab 7" came to US the phone call ability was just disconnected, carriers don´t like lose the control over the product.
If Samsung offer a product with this capability, many carriers can not accept to offer it, now this still has a advantage... APPLICATIONS.
If just Whatsapp, Viber, Tango, ChatOn, etc... can offer this apps without using the main phone number, it could work aver 3G/4G network.
This camera has mics and speakers and would be interesting to try Skipe on it.

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Sep 21, 2012)

"We combined the best bits of a smartphone with the best bits of a compact camera together."
- Sun Hong Lim

Apparently Samsung's VP of Sales and Marketing does not believe that one of the best bits of a smartphone is the ability to make phone calls.

3 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Sep 21, 2012)

Sun Hong Lim, Samsung, I personally wish you all the best with this concept.

Samsung are indeed innovators, and a powerful one at that. The ability to manufacture screens, sensors, processors, and if my interest in Samsung serves me correctly, the ability to manufacture the materials used to build the devices, is a very powerful position to be in. Unlike Apple, you don't find yourself having to source major technologies produced by outside companies.

On a physical scale, smart phones must be the most challenging of any consumer electronics product. The fact that Samsung produce the best smart phone in the world, is perhaps the most obvious indication of Samsung's ability.

PS: If you're looking for a designer to compete with Sir Ive, contact me.

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Oct 6, 2012)

Last time I checked, Samsung were the worlds largest Electronics manufacturer. They didn't get there by being a "Monkey Brand", they got there through selling quality gear below the prices demanded from competing companies.

Such achievements are to be commended, not spat upon.

0 upvotes
Fred Briggs
By Fred Briggs (Sep 21, 2012)

I can't see anyone who uses their smartphone to take pictures, and wants to improve photo quality, buying this just because it has an Android based user interface, especially if it's going to cost the same as a smartphone yet only provide compact camera photo quality. Also, being Android based it will have little appeal to Apple and Windows phone users.

The demand is not for a camera that operates like a smartphone, but for smartphones that take better pictures. I think the Nokia PureView approach is good - just a shame the phone part of the packages are so far lacking in appeal, being based on Symbian. They need to put this into a Windows 8 phone and license it to others to incorporate in Android phones.

Maybe we are heading to a multi-purpose display/computer/camera 3G/4G/WiFi connected type device (CamTab,TabCam?) that does everything except phone calls, and we all revert back to tiny simple phone modules for actually making calls - BlueToothed to the TabCam for contacts, etc.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Sep 21, 2012)

Stark contrast w/ Nikon's interview, focused on photo http://www.dpreview.com/articles/7228819844/photokina-2012-interview-dirk-jasper-of-nikon

Agreed w/ all asking: Why an Android phone camera, having all the radios in place, but not working as a phone? Once we go down this way, why stop before reaching home?

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Sep 21, 2012)

It's a real shame that this can't make phone calls too. All the tech is there; after all, this is just a Galaxy S3 with a camera bolted on the front. It seems that they've disabled the ability to make phone calls deliberately - presumably to make it easier to position this device as a camera rather than a phone.

What I really want to see is my Galaxy S4 next year coming with a really great camera on the front. Something comparable to the Sony RX100 would be nice, or something like Nokia's Pureview (the proper one!) would do at a push.

0 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (Sep 21, 2012)

Look our real cameras are a failure so we'll start talking up smart cameras. I'm as interested in this as a hole in the head. Don't get me wrong aspects of this are great idea and hopefully appear in all DSLR's, but these are crummy cameras attached to a smart phone that isn't a phone.

I really can see myself doing photo-editing on these tiny screens too.

0 upvotes
dbateman
By dbateman (Sep 20, 2012)

Let us spot the treads.

1. AF lenses are bad, Manual focus lenses are much better. Now all AF!
2. Digital can't survive, the quality is not as good as Film. Now Film is almost dead
3. Live view is terrible, who needs it. Now all camera have it, including Medium format.
4. Movies shouldn't be in cameras (still in this one). Now major selling feature!

Now the New one. Wifi in Cameras and Internet connected. Sorry every body in 2 years this will be needed in everything!

10 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Sep 20, 2012)

I agree 100% with dbateman. I will not buy a camera without built in wifi, and preferably 4G.

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Sep 20, 2012)

@CDBayy Have fun shooting with dinky point & shoots then ;)

1 upvote
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Sep 20, 2012)

well I would absolutely prefer an NX Android phone. But that may be another six months.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 21, 2012)

dbateman:

For years MF was better than AF, and manual focus lenses still sell, try getting a Zeiss for your D800.

Nobody particularly objected to video in digital still cameras without mirrors. Same point about live view, which is still problematic in many dslrs.

Android is a glitchy OS.

No one particularly objects to a wifi connection in a camera, what photographers object to is wifi dependency for cameras--there's a huge difference.

I can't think of a camera phone that shoots raw, until such time no one will treat camera phones too seriously, including the Nokia 808 and this Samsung almostcamfoneborg.

For about 10 years, 1991-2001, digital just wasn't up to film, and today film, at lower ISOs, can still do better dynamic range.

Finally: These camfoneborgs don't take interchangeable lenses yet, no reason some future variation couldn't, but until such time no one will treat these "cameras" seriously. Might as well just put a cellphone in a Nikon D4, that's a camera.

1 upvote
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Sep 22, 2012)

Wow for once I agree with everything you just said HowaboutRAW

0 upvotes
Cheezr
By Cheezr (Sep 20, 2012)

What struck me is that they are planning to sell these thru "carriers". I really dont see myself going to ATT to buy a camera. Are they planning to put 4G data capability in this? Why would ATT sell it if they cant slap it with a 2 yr contract?

In many ways Samsung makes great products and in many ways they appear clueless! Hmmm, good paradox!

3 upvotes
Alexramos
By Alexramos (Sep 21, 2012)

And what do you think you´ll do with a 3G/4G camera without the carriers?
If you buy it in BestBuy, Amazon or BH finally you will have to go to a carrier to activate the data plan.
There will be a only WiFi version that could be fine for many people using for example share data form their phones.
The carriers are right now looking for limited data and what kind of plan they can offer for it camera.

0 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (Sep 20, 2012)

DPR comes off as rather disrespectful, here. Would you ask Canon 'Are you confident that you can compete in the future?'

2 upvotes
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Sep 20, 2012)

Are you now comparing Samsung to Canon..LOL..LOL...LOL OMG you are funny

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
dbateman
By dbateman (Sep 20, 2012)

I think they should ask Canon if they think they can compete in the future. Or even will they be around in the future. Canon is not looking good and doesn't have medical or Microscopy business to fall back on. Sorry but I can see Canon gone in 10 years.

3 upvotes
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Sep 20, 2012)

Ok Nostradamus and the world will be ending in 2012, or wait was that 2000

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (Sep 21, 2012)

And the lack of screening out under-18 types has never been more evident.

0 upvotes
wisep01
By wisep01 (Sep 21, 2012)

What need have they to inquire about Canon's future competitiveness when it is clearly having trouble being competitive today?

0 upvotes
chadley_chad
By chadley_chad (Sep 21, 2012)

@sensibill

I know, how rude ... Fancy asking a challenging question rather than just blowing smoke up his ass ... these reporters eh ... Shamefull!!!

0 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Sep 20, 2012)

I do not have a cell phone. I have an awesome pair of tin cans tied together by fishing line - the audio is just fine for me. I do not have a computer, I have a blackboard and some chalk - it is just fine for doing arithmetic. I do not use a camera - I have some charcoal and the back or a rusty shovel to sketch images on. I do not understand why anyone would want to carry around a bunch of electronics, or waste their time staring at the GoogleMachine. I do not know what Twitter, Google+, Pinterest or Facebook are and I do not care. How many people even use Facebook? More than 100?

4 upvotes
songeun7
By songeun7 (Sep 20, 2012)

Haha! I couldn't agree more with you Cordellwillis.

0 upvotes
Cameron R Hood
By Cameron R Hood (Sep 20, 2012)

Wonder who's cameras they're going to copy from and steal this year? Probably EVERYBODY, as usual.

3 upvotes
cordellwillis
By cordellwillis (Sep 20, 2012)

Nawww, we can leave that for Apple. They will get into the camera making business and claim they invented it, then turn around and take everyone to court.

11 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (Sep 20, 2012)

Because nobody but Samsung 'copies' and 'steals' ideas, tech, etc.

Not basically every single other electronics and camera maker. Nope.

2 upvotes
Cameron R Hood
By Cameron R Hood (Sep 20, 2012)

For them, it's their primary means of doing business...they copy washing machines, cell phones, monitors, EVERYTHING, then hope to tie it up in court for ten years till nobody cares anymore...I have a six year old flip phone from them, thought it was pretty cool at the time, TILL I SAW THE NOKIA THEY RIPPED IT OFF FROM. They can't even make a $150.00 flip phone without copying it. And their owner bought a STOLEN 12 million dollar vintage Ferrari that he won't give back...run by crooks, owned by crooks....

2 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (Sep 21, 2012)

Nonsense. Samsung is no better or worse than any other tech company. I've seen Apple and others copy them, other cameras copy their features. It's like saying one athlete caught using steroids is an isolated example.

You're just biased against Samsung. That in itself is fine, but until you can substantiate wild aggro claims, you'll just come off as the usual forum brand hater.

1 upvote
pumeco
By pumeco (Sep 21, 2012)

Samsung are way ahead of Apple, in fact, all of the major electronics manufacturers are. Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony are all technologically more capable than Apple.

The vast majority of those that cannot see this, are people who talk to SIRI on their iPhone.

Sooner or later the Apple bubble will burst, in fact, I think it already has done. I didn't see them ranting about how well their sales were doing this year. I mean it doesn't take a genius to guess why they weren't boasting about the sales of iPhones during the keynote, does it.

They had so little to boast about that they pointed out it was their thinnest iPhone yet, so many times I lost count. I also hear they think it will be the best selling iPhone yet

lol - I'm just glad I'm not the one who's going to look like a daydreamer when it doesn't happen. You only have to look across the web at the disgust shown towards Apple (even by Apple users) to know that you need to be selling your iPhone this year, not buying one.

0 upvotes
Alexramos
By Alexramos (Sep 21, 2012)

Cameron I think Apple has been using too much soap and bleach on you brain...
A final product can be similar, but try memories, screens, processors, connection chips, etc... I think there is more than just one explanation of why one of the best processors, memories and screen used all around the world came from Samsung.

1 upvote
chadley_chad
By chadley_chad (Sep 22, 2012)

@pumeco

How do you define 'way ahead' when the iPhone is such a better phone ... and I don't see Samsung offering better computers either?

I own a new GIII (work) and an iPhone 4 (pleasure). The later of which I've dropped down stairs more times than I can count. I dropped the samsung yesterday after owning 3 days and the screen cracked ... It's a pile of plastic crap!

Whislt there are apple fanboys, here's also immature apple haters. Which one are you?

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Sep 23, 2012)

Which one am I?

I'm an Apple hater, sure, but not an immature one and therefore cannot claim either of those titles.

How do I define way ahead?

I bought a Sony VAIO FZ Series (now my sisters), around what, must be five or six years ago now.

Some six-year-old Sony specs for you:

- Magnesium chassis and shell
- 2.4 GHz Dual Core Intel
- 4GB RAM
- nVidia graphics
- HD Display with HD resolution and almost 100% colour gamut
- Plays Blu-ray, writes Blu-ray, and even rewrites Blu-ray

That's six years ago, Chadley, six years.

Now, go and check the specs of a £1000 Apple laptop from the same year, and while you're at it, take a look at the amount of bewildered Apple users on YouTube who still haven't figured out why Apple won't let them have a Blu-ray drive :-D

I reckon it's because without a Blu-ray drive, you are far more likely to buy your entertainment through iTunes, and lets face it, Apple want you buying everything from them.

Far too manipulative and behind the times for me :-)

1 upvote
Desverger
By Desverger (Sep 20, 2012)

I think connectivity (WiFI or 4G/LTE) is likely to be a divisive feature - there will be those who love it and those who hate it. Sorta like when digital cameras first came around, those using film poopooed the digital upcommers. The way I see it really is how we consume the photos. It used to be that regardless of how you shot your photos - digitally or film - people would end up viewing them on some kind of photographic paper, canvas or whatever. But now people are more likely to view them on computer, TV or cell phone. In the latter case, you really don't want 20MP uncompressed images being transmitted around, partially because no one wants to download a bunch of images that size. So having your camera upload photos of say your son or daughter to a semi-public album on Picasa makes a lot of sense. I wouldn't want RAW files uploaded because there's no need - but I'd still shoot raw in the event that I'd want to print one or two choice shots.

1 upvote
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Sep 20, 2012)

Someone needs to come out with camera with the IQ of say an X10, and also the ability to run android and make phone calls! Fuji I believe in you!! ;)

0 upvotes
Simon97
By Simon97 (Sep 20, 2012)

Tell Mr Lim to fix their unreliable products. I bought a ST76 digital camera. For the low price, it does HD video and optical zoom during shooting. Beautiful uncompressed audio as well. The first camera just quit out of the blue while shooting stills. I got a replacement. Both cameras freeze during file transfer to the computer and every so often leave fixed purple bars in the video. I tried the firmware update to no avail.

Then there's that 52" TV that has broken down twice.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Simon97
By Simon97 (Sep 20, 2012)

I guess so, but returned both cameras. The TV is my parents. I repaired it for them both times. First the powersupply capacitors failed and I installed new ones (2010). A year later, the timing controller board died. Installed a new one. So far, so good in 2012.

3 upvotes
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Sep 22, 2012)

So was all those repairs warranty or did you pay to get it fixed?

0 upvotes
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Sep 20, 2012)

Sum Hong Lim, once you use the iphone 5 you will never want to use the Samsung imitation ;) Poor us for using conventional cameras are you kidding...LOL

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 11 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Alexramos
By Alexramos (Sep 21, 2012)

I think one thing is true...
Then to use a WiFi enable camera, you won´t go back to a regular P&S.

0 upvotes
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Sep 22, 2012)

I have one, it's called a "Cell Phone" and I can actually make a phone call on it.
I think they should put a cell phone in the NX cameras and call it the retro cell phone, you know those old 1980 brick cell phones they use to have, that would be nice

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
kff
By kff (Sep 20, 2012)

I would buy a new NX with Wi-Fi, but they don't have AF adapter for K mount lenses ... :(

0 upvotes
Professor999
By Professor999 (Sep 20, 2012)

NX to k0mount lens adapter

http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/photo-news/535442/samsung-nx-lens-adapter-for-pentax-k-and-samsung-gx-lenses-review-and-picture-gallery

0 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (Sep 20, 2012)

He said AF - as in Auto Focus. Not a 2 year old announcement for a 'dummy' adapter like you can get a dime a dozen on ebay for any mount.

2 upvotes
Professor999
By Professor999 (Sep 20, 2012)

He said AF I didn't.
I tried to give some information to a fellow poster as an alternative.
Why do you have a problem with this?

1 upvote
chadley_chad
By chadley_chad (Sep 21, 2012)

@ professor999

If you read Sensibills posts you'll quickly see he's a bit of a (or a poor troll), don't be taken in ;-)

1 upvote
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Sep 20, 2012)

I think Barney had a good idea to ask if they really did market research.
This is futile. A waste of R&D. It still is point and shoot( though with a better display).
This could only sell if it were less than half the price of an S3, like you get the hardware of latest iPhone hardware at less costs through the iPod touch.

3 upvotes
Lee Jay
By Lee Jay (Sep 20, 2012)

"Definitely. Already we are living in the cloud era. "

Ever try to upload a couple terabytes of raw images to the cloud? Ever try to scroll through them and process them once they are there? D800 raw images can be 100MB each. Even my 7 year old dSLRs put out 25MB raw images. Enthusiast and professional cameras are getting farther from the cloud, not closer.

10 upvotes
migus
By migus (Sep 20, 2012)

many of us shoot 1K+ shots per day; knowing SRW's size, how long will it take and cost me to upload my daily crop into the "Cloud"?

1 upvote
Esa Tuunanen
By Esa Tuunanen (Sep 22, 2012)

Maybe he meant smoke cloud of industry and traffic where urbanized people live as South Korea is densely populated.

First requirements for storing all data elsewhere would be basically optical fiber class connection and fast such everywhere.
By their nature basically all wireless connections except directed line of sight links have bandwidth and latency completely at mercy of about everything including positions of planets and horoscopes.

And just how would it make non snapshooting photography any better if images were saved elsewhere than in camera?
Even event shooting pros who have to get images fast to press need to choose best images and sent only those instead of spamming every photo.

While improving their technology to level of others Samsung doesn't have traditional brand recognization in photography or any major feature for their system to stand out from others so they keep making much noise from half gimmick features.

1 upvote
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (Sep 20, 2012)

I see little interest, by this guy, about Samsung NX future. NX line is one of the few mirrorless systems that didn't got an upgrade/update during Photokina. Sony and Fuji are IMHO now well ahed as to image quality and low ISO performance, not to mention operational speed.

Samsung lenses still have an edge, but this will not last forever, unfortunately.

As a NX100 user, I was expecting the rumoured NX-R with newer and better sensor to match and possibly exceed Sony and Fuji performance. Will we ever see new NX bodies??

1 upvote
turretless
By turretless (Sep 20, 2012)

<quote>
If you use a smartphone, could you go back to an older feature phone? Once you experience the future you cannot go back to the past.
</quote>
Strange. I could. Bought a Galaxy, played a couple of months with Internet connectivity, found it completely useless and too expensive, then canceled the data plan and have been using it as a simple phone for two years since. I would've fallen back on my Motorola, but I changed the provider...

Anyway. It seems like trying to create microscope-hammer hybrids is a new fad. Goes nicely with facebook/G+/LinkedIn shtuff. I don't understand it. Maybe I'm too old for this brave new world.

0 upvotes
Cane
By Cane (Sep 20, 2012)

OMG, is anyone that posts in these forums not sitting in God's waiting room? It's either bad eyes, big fingers, or that new technology like Facebook! Apple sauce eaters, you aren't the target market for camera companies. I know you'd be happy with a digital replica of any camera from 1950 to 1972, but not gonna happen.

5 upvotes
turretless
By turretless (Sep 20, 2012)

@Cane
I like the attitude :) Though it's all relative. If I honestly think that iPhone is crap, doesn't mean it's crap for everybody. As falling paints of a teen might be very nice looking garment for him, but it's still crap for my uneducated self. Who is right? Nobody and everybody, just a matter of a personal perception ;)
And regarding target markets, I beg to differ. Many of us, old farts, are spending quite a few bucks on quite expensive photo equipment while sitting in line in front of the last door. It is called a "market niche". And I'm not sure this niche is much smaller than the whole gadgetry brouhaha.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 20, 2012)

What on earth is this guy thinking: People buy the NX system for it's lenses and someone in Samsung knows this point.

As others have said, who wants to be "connected" all the time? I know South Korea has really fast internet service and I'd bet cell phone coverage everywhere, but how does this make my camera better.

So does this camfoneborg shoot raw, take interchangeable lenses, calculate for bounce flash use, and have good manual focus? The NX system can and does.

4 upvotes
NeilBart
By NeilBart (Sep 20, 2012)

Perhaps in these comments the business productivity use of the Galaxy Camera is being overlooked. The Galaxy Camera has a lot of potential used with Mobile Data Studio software in Android where images can be captured alongside text, numeric and other data, and the images can also be sketched on to highlight issues. The images and data are then sent back to the office or base via the mobile phone system or WiFi. This higher quality camera than on a Smartphone, combined with Mobile Data, secure communications, GPS, mapping and other functions will be valuable for environmental surveys, asset tracking, home inspections, security checks, asbestos audits, graffiti survey and removal, weed identification and many other commercial and government applications. And it will also be fun to use after work.

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 20, 2012)

i just read that it isnt a phone ???

so whats the point of this camera compared to a real camera and an iphon plus a usb cable?

i will have my cam with me because i want to take photos
i will have my iphone with me
i need a short usb cable plus connector, that fits iany pocket of my camera bag

so what exactly is a point when a tv company brings out a camera with a cellphone operating system, but the decive cant call? ^^

and whats the big difference to the nikon android again? besides that nikon is a camera company and not a phone company, so they didnt include one ?

4 upvotes
TheEye
By TheEye (Sep 20, 2012)

"You cannot leave the house without a smartphone today."

I feel sorry for him if he feels that way. I don't carry a cellphone. The idea of being connected 24/7 is unappealing to me.

Some people think they'll leave the house without of a phone, only to die because of a flat tire. :-P

9 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 20, 2012)

absolutely, i have an iphone, thats off 60% of all times, because i just dont want to be available 24/7

i cant understand people that like that, dont you have jobs? if i leave my cellphone on 24/7 i get calls 24/7, who likes that?

beside kids that only get called by friends

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Sep 20, 2012)

I have a cell phone and it collects dust, it get wiped off about 4x a year, that's it. I grew up being tied to a pager 24/7 and that horrid experience was enough to teach me a very valuable lesson in life. Very very valuable.

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Sep 20, 2012)

i'm techno freak, computer lover, audiophile, videophile etc., yet i never had a mobile phone. I don't reject them, but i don't see their benefits to my life and work.

0 upvotes
meanwhile
By meanwhile (Sep 20, 2012)

I don't think I'll try this given the warning. I like using conventional cameras and I'd hate to think I'll never be able to use one again!

5 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 20, 2012)

true if i never could go back, i wont give it a try either

0 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Sep 20, 2012)

Do you see a photography app on the screen shot of the home screen? I must be missing it. ;) This would be an interesting camera to test drive. I can see many more point & shoot smart cameras in the future. As far as advantages, smart phones are getting bigger and bigger, but a smart camera of this size may have better battery life than most smart phones. The quality of posted pictures to facebook and such may improve. For sharing videos and pictures with families and friends at a distance, this could be really good. Skype might be an even richer experience if you can zoom with a much better lens during calls. Off loading pictures to your computer wirelessly would be nice. Art filters like Olympus has only with infinite choices and new apps always coming out could be fun. But one of the largest advantages that I can see is that such devices may give me smartphone like capabilities on a wireless network without the endless monthly cost of data contracts.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
AlanJones
By AlanJones (Sep 20, 2012)

I have always liked Samsung products and this new Galaxy camera is a rather interesting idea and could appeal to customers like...me. I wish I could have a decent quality camera on me at all times but carrying a cell and camera is a hassle. This makes sense.I commend Samsung on a bold move and hopefully I can get the cell half price when my Verizon contract is up next winter :-)

0 upvotes
Maxfield_photo
By Maxfield_photo (Sep 20, 2012)

While I agree that the market is headed that way, I don't need for my camera to be able to share pictures with my friends and family, listen to iTunes, make a phone call, or play Angry Birds; I need it to take the pictures that I tell it to take. The notion that 'you can't go back' to a normal camera is hogwash, I've just re-transitioned to film and I'm enjoying every minute of it. Cameras don't have to be these soulless technocratic monstrosities. Honestly I like Leica's philosophy of simplicity, just not their price tag.

6 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Sep 20, 2012)

Security is also a concern for these connected devices.
I do not wish that footage of me sleeping with my girlfriend's mother's boyfriend's neighbour's cat being hacked from my camera and spread across the world.

2 upvotes
Geoff Brown
By Geoff Brown (Sep 20, 2012)

But you could get well paid for sleeping with the cat. Newspapers are falling over themselves for articles such as that!!!

3 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Sep 20, 2012)

In fact I miss the old days when phones have physical buttons, I could text with one hand and without looking at the phone, and also need not worry it would suddenly freeze, or shut down.
Not to mention the battery life, 3 days was the minimum acceptable duration back then.
Now people are using software to limit their phone to use only 1 core in a quad-core CPU, and dim the screen just to squeeze out 16 hours of usage.

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Sep 20, 2012)

Just a little tip, if you turn data off on a smartphone then it will easily last a few days on standby.

2 upvotes
Fred Briggs
By Fred Briggs (Sep 20, 2012)

Anyone know if you can makes calls on this thing, or do you have to carry a phone around as well? I know it has 3G/4G but is that just for data conectivity or voice as well?

1 upvote
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Sep 20, 2012)

Just to be clear, the Galaxy Camera is not a phone and won't make cell calls. In principle you could use it for Skype over 3G/4G, but the ergonomics aren't exactly ideal.

3 upvotes
_sem_
By _sem_ (Sep 20, 2012)

It strikes me how in the process of perfect integration of a smartphone and a camera the phone capability was found to be redundant :) :) :) And how come Nikon happened to arrive at the same conclusion :) :) :) And the interviewer didn't care to ask :) :) :)
The other probable advantage of this merger would be the ability to customize camera operation by programming your own camera control app... This could make an end to complaints over designer's decisions regarding features omitted from firmware... but I'd bet there's no API that would allow something like that!
I see a very limited (extincting) market for such devices: folks that still use small dumbphones!

2 upvotes
fotobo
By fotobo (Sep 20, 2012)

cameras will help sell home appliances? Let me picture this ;).

1 upvote
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Sep 20, 2012)

Camera will ID appliances captured in photo and suggest a comparable Samsung model and bring up the map app to direct you to the nearest outlet.

An attorney app add-on will recognize your wife in photo, upload to "hot or not" and bring up list of Yelp rated divorced lawyers if she is voted not hot.

I have this patented so don't try to steal this. :D

3 upvotes
Freemindset
By Freemindset (Sep 20, 2012)

Quite true Samuel. Photography on this year's Photokina became "Consumography".

4 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Sep 20, 2012)

I've a connected camera on my phone and my tablet, but somehow i'm always shooting with a dslr and old mf lenses.

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Sep 20, 2012)

Wi-Fi, horizontal integration, consumers, ‘content and services,’ mobile operators.

Even by marketese standards, this interview makes depressing reading. This man has no love for photography or visual culture, and thinks his customers are instead consumers.

11 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 20, 2012)

They are. By definition.

4 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Sep 20, 2012)

Consider this is Samsung, they don't know what customers mean.

Don't expect software update or support but do expect a new model in six months.

2 upvotes
migus
By migus (Sep 20, 2012)

There's a contradiction here. Computers have users - excepting perhaps Apple's :-). The Android camera is arguably a camera with its computer exposed. Aren't its 'consumer' upgraded to 'user' status?

I hope this Android camera will enhance camera's core functionality, e.g. CHDK-like (http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK). Apps, WiFi, GPS, connectivity etc. are all fine signs of progress - yet the core remains unchanged: PHOTOGRAPHY.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (Sep 21, 2012)

I suggest Samsung to opensource it (some or all part). so many people can edit and modify it. adding more features, including adjust some setting if needed.
with that the improvements will much faster

0 upvotes
Ixon
By Ixon (Sep 21, 2012)

Over on XDA a couple have managed to change a few things in the camera software on Android Based Smartphones, ie up the bitrate on 720p & 1080p Video recording, and also improve the image quality with less compression with Jpeg, as this camera is basically a Galaxy S3 with out the phone and better sensor then i see no problem with people hacking the camera software to get better bitrate from video, & proberly better image quality depending on what Samsung do with the image quality side of things.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 100