Photographic pioneer Eadweard Muybridge was fascinated by motion, and today, scientists at the Locomotion Lab of the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena continue to use cameras to research how we walk. As well as looking at human and animal movements, they've also created 'walking robots', and are capturing their movement using high-speed cameras. According to Zeiss's blog, the researchers are using the Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 2/50 ZF.2 lens attached to Vosskühler HCC-1000 cameras, which are capable of 923 fps, at 1024 x 512 pixel resolution. 

The 'JenaFox' walking robot and the Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 2/50 ZF.2 in action in the Locomotion Lab of the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena.
This robot was created by the University of Zürich for motion analysis at the Locomotion Lab in Jena. 

According to Doctor Sten Grimmer, 'the aim of our project is to construct robotic systems which can move around in various environments, based on our understanding of the morphology of various creatures'. 

'For instance, if we wish to understand how the body of a dog with a leg injury adjusts to the changed situation, we need to put the specially-constructed robot who also has only three legs on the running track'. Filming these robots at ultra high-speeds allows researchers to take a very close look at the minutiae of the complex movements that the robots make.