Buyer's Guide: Enthusiast raw-shooting compact cameras

Fujifilm X10

12MP | 28-112mm (4x) Zoom | $599 (US) £437 (UK) €559 (EU)



Fujifilm's first foray into what is sometimes called the 'luxury' compact camera market, the X10 takes its styling cues from the APS-C format, fixed-lens X100 but offers a fast 28-112mm (equivalent) f/2-2.8 zoom lens, and the company's unique EXR sensor technology. As I'd expect from a camera in this class, the 12MP X10 also boasts raw file capture, all from a sensor that is between 20-40% larger than than its high-end compact peers (and about twice as large as those in typical compact cameras).

Like its larger-format stablemate the X100, the X10 is designed to appeal to connoisseurs of form as well as function. Its black metal body is generously wrapped in a mock-leather grain finish and the manual zoom ring and (coupled) optical viewfinder are highly distinctive.

Unusually for a compact camera, the X10's 28-112mm (equivalent) zoom lens is controlled manually using a 'traditional' mechanical zoom ring. Focal lengths are marked (very approximately) on the ring itself.  Like the Canon G12 and Nikon P7100, the X10 features an optical viewfinder that is coupled with its zoom lens. Coverage is approximate but close enough to be useful in a pinch, if ambient lighting conditions are too bright to see the LCD screen (which can be turned off if desired). 
In keeping with its classic styling, the X10 features a manual focus mode switch, on the front of the camera next to the lens barrel.  On the rear of the thumbnail, adjacent to the thumb grip, is a dual-purpose mode dial. Turning the dial sets exposure parameters while in review mode, pressing it inwards activates a useful one-touch magnification view for checking critical focus. 

Its specification is very far from old-fashioned though. The X10's ISO sensitivity settings run from ISO 100-6400 at full resolution, HD video capture is possible, with stereo sound, and then of course there's Fujifilm's unique EXR technology.

The X10's sensor is built on conventional CMOS architecture (rather than being back-illuminated) but the way it works is far from conventional. Whereas in the Bayer pattern, there's always an entire photosite gap between any two photosites of the same color whereas the EXR arrangement puts pairs of similarly colored photosites together. In fact, you can think of the EXR filter array as being two Bayer patterns slotted together, with one of them offset relative to the other, by 1/2 a pixel. We have published a more complete explanation of the technology here.

There are three EXR modes - 'HR', high-resolution, in which the X10's full complement of 12MP is used to create images, 'DR', dynamic range, where you can capture images with a much greater dynamic range than would normality be possible, and 'SN' - signal to noise, designed to give cleaner, less noisy images at high ISO settings in poor light. Because of the way that they work (in effect by combining the signals from neighbouring photodiodes) Both DR and SN modes output 6MP images. The X10 also has a more conventional dynamic range expansion mode, which delivers expanded highlight dynamic range at the expense of a reduced ISO sensitivity span. Confusingly, despite being completely different technologies, both EXR and conventional dynamic range expansion is described in the same way in the X10's menu system, as 'DR XXX%'.

Key Features

  • 12.0MP 2/3" CMOS (EXR pixel arrangement)
  • ISO 100-3200 (up to 6400 at 6MP and 12,800 at 3MP)
  • 28-112MM (equivalent) f/2.0-2.8 zoom lens
  • PASM modes and full manual control in 1/3EV steps
  • Twin control dials (both on rear)
  • 1080p video @ 30fps with stereo sound
  • 2.8in, 460k-dot LCD screen

Performance/Image Quality

The X10 might look rather like the X100, but fortunately, it is free from most of the operational quirks that marred our experience of using that camera. Most importantly, the X10 is pleasantly responsive in normal use (although the older Canon PowerShot G12 still boasts faster shot-to-shot times), both when shooting and reviewing images. Despite lacking the innovative focal-plane phase-detection AF system of some of its lower-end compact stablemates, the X10 achieves focus quickly and (usually) reliably. I'm not not too enamoured of its face-detection system though, which has an irritating tendency to recognise faces until the moment you try to take a photograph, at which point - all too frequently - the camera has a crisis of confidence and AF defaults to conventional multi-point or area mode.

The Fujifilm X10 has given a nicely-balanced flash shot here, and has provided even illumination without completely overpowering the warm ambient light. The only real frustration with flash photography comes in social situations, where the X10's face detection AF system isn't as reliable as we'd like it to be. 

Also frustrating is the way in which Fujifilm has implemented the X10's EXR functionality. You could be forgiven for thinking that EXR is an exclusively JPEG-only, automatic exposure mode, but in fact, it is possible to combine 'DR' EXR capture (in our experience the most useful of the two 6MP modes) with full exposure control and even in combination with raw file capture. You just have to manually select medium resolution (6MP) capture first (and raw+JPEG mode if you want to shoot raw files), at which point you can extend dynamic range by up to 2EV (from 100% to 400%). You can see the effect of this extra dynamic range in the scene below, which for the purposes of easy comparison, was shot at 6MP with DR at 100% (EXR off) and 400% (EXR on) at ISO 100.
In conventional 100% DR mode, dynamic range in JPEG files is good, but as always, in scenes like this which contain a wide tonal range, highlights can be clipped. 100% Crop
With DR at 400% in 6MP capture mode, Fujifilm's EXR technology kicks in, and gives an extra 2EV of dynamic range without restricting the ISO span.  100% Crop
Despite its complicated implementation, the X10'S 'DR' EXR mode is one of my favourite things about the camera. Image quality at its full pixel count of 12MP is very good, but in my opinion the benefits of the additional highlight detail in the 6MP DR mode are worth the penalty in resolution. 
The X10 gives very good image quality in 12MP JPEG mode, but pixel-level detail isn't quite as convincing as we'd expect from a camera with a more conventional sensor arrangement (like the Canon Powershot S100). That said, by the time it comes to making prints or viewing images at medium magnification on-screen the difference is subtle.  100% Crop
I converted this simultaneously-captured raw file 'to taste' in the bundled Raw File Converter EX software, and as you can see, even after careful sharpening and noise reduction tweaks the difference at 100% is pretty minimal. I was able to adjust white balance and saturation though, for an image that more closely matches the original scene.  100% Crop

The raw-conversion software bundled with the X10 - Fujifilm Raw Converter EX - is rather disappointing. Built around Silkpix, it is painfully slow and not particularly user-friendly. More frustratingly, despite an abundance of interestingly-named sharpening and noise-reduction options, it is difficult to create a raw file conversion that looks significantly better than the excellent in-camera JPEGs. Fortunately the X10 features a fast, effective in-camera raw conversion function, which is much more convenient for quick fixes like basic white balance and brightness tweaks. Because raw support for the X10's files is currently so limited, we haven't included raw conversions from the X10 in our studio scene comparison tool (see the bottom of this page). 

As regards still image quality perhaps the only serious fly in the X10 ointment at present is an issue which has been discussed fairly widely among X10 owners, and relates to specular highlights. Simply put, the X10 renders clipped point highlights as disproportionally large, hard-edges 'orbs', which once you've started to notice them, are impossible to ignore.

Caused by sensor blooming (excess charge from individual photosites spilling over into neighbouring ones) the 'white spot' issue is only visible in a handful of our samples but is very distracting once you start noticing it.  100% Crop

We'll be looking into this issue, (you can read a statement from Fujifilm, and see more examples here) and of course we'll be running the X10 through our normal gamut of image quality tests as part of a full review of the camera in early 2012.

I doubt whether movies will be much of a priority for X10 users, but it offers good performance in this mode, including (of course) zoom control during shooting and the option for continuous AF. 1080p footage is sharp and detailed, but rolling shutter from the X10's CMOS sensor is very obvious in scenes with moderate subject (or camera) movement. 

Summary

It's too early to give a definitive 'dpreview take' on the X10, but for now, I'm cautiously impressed. I'm very pleased to see that whereas its big brother the X100 can on occasion be a somewhat slow, frustrating camera to use, the X10 is fast, responsive, and (on the whole) sensibly designed. I really like the mechanical zoom ring, and although the relatively restricted coverage of the optical finder reduces its usefulness in everyday photography, it's there if you need it. 

My experience so far hasn't been 100% positive though. The X10 has inherited one truly unwelcome trait from the X100 - it resets exposure information, including ISO and DR preferences when exposure mode is changed (so if you're shooting in aperture priority at ISO 100 and DR 100%, and switch to manual exposure mode, the camera will switch to whatever ISO sensitivity and DR setting you last used in that exposure mode). I really hope that Fujifilm squashes this bug as soon as possible, and issues a firmware update in the same way as it did for the X100.

I remain utterly baffled too as to why Fujifilm has made one of the X10's standout features - its excellent 6MP 'DR' EXR mode - so hard to get to grips with, and I'd like to see a more user-friendly menu system (I have given up hope of a more useable bundled raw converter). Also disappointing is its flaky face detection AF and relatively poor battery life, and an occasional tendency to forget to power up when you rotate the zoom from off into its 'on' position (an issue that can be mitigated, in my experience, by rotating the lens firmly, smoothly and fairly slowly from its 'off' position).

The X10 is certainly an acquired taste, but on the whole, provided that you're prepared to put a bit of work into setting it up, the X10's quick operation and excellent image quality (especially in 6MP 'DR' EXR modes) make it worthy of serious consideration alongside its more conventional peers. My advice would be to shoot in RAW+JPEG mode at 6MP, with DR set to 400%. Convert your raw files in-camera and that way you have the choice of up to 2EV of extra dynamic range as and when you need it. And make sure you keep the lens clean - the X10's convex front element is very prone to smears from clothing and fingertips... 

Studio and Real-World Samples (links open in new tab)

Studio Comparison Tool (JPEG only) Fujfilm X10 Samples (32 images)

Click here to turn to page 4 of our enthusiast raw-shooting compact cameras buyers' guide...

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Comments

Total comments: 286
12
Cleve Lightfoot
By Cleve Lightfoot (Aug 7, 2012)

perhaps it is my ignorance but no Ricoh?

0 upvotes
brdeveloper
By brdeveloper (Sep 14, 2012)

Maybe because Ricoh doesn't make "big sensor" compact cameras. Ricoh's cameras live in an exclusive niche.

0 upvotes
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (Jul 18, 2012)

This roundup needs to be updated.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Aug 2, 2012)

It will be. this autumn, hopefully.

2 upvotes
Realfi
By Realfi (Jun 11, 2012)

A comprehensive review of the X10 with revised sensor please!

0 upvotes
Puppet27
By Puppet27 (May 19, 2012)

Personally I would've liked the Ricoh GXR to be in that group also. Be interested in the comparison. Sadly, it doesn't seem to register on the DPR radar too often.....

0 upvotes
picthis
By picthis (May 13, 2012)

I'm a little confused about dpreview's ratings. On one hand, XZ-1 scores 74% Gold award, top score vs all other cameras with P7100 scoring a terrible 69% yet it is recommended for Versability, Handling & Value but XZ-1 is not mentioned in any parts, esp IQ. I can understand if XZ-1 is oldest camera and newer cameras may have surpassed its dated standards, but XZ-1 is reviewed later than most of other cameras being judged, so its score of 74% should have been given more weight.

Sure this is about best 'RAW' but reading the conclusion I wouldn't have known as it include most of categories of in-dept reviews. And most believe that XZ-1 jpeg is quite good but the RAW even better. If XZ-1 Raw IQ, handling, versatility, value can't even beat the other 4 cameras, how in the world did it receive 74% Gold Award??

I'm sure the camera gurus have better empirical evidence than me. But having used my girlfriends G12 and my XZ-1, my XZ-1 is the one closer to DSLR quality and performance.

3 upvotes
nmpimenta
By nmpimenta (Jul 19, 2012)

I totally agree with you... after reading the XZ-1 review, this roundup is, to say the least, surprising! (hope my english is good :))

0 upvotes
lasbalogh
By lasbalogh (Apr 8, 2012)

the lens of Olympus XZ 1 is the better and, my opinion is that, it is the best value for money.

2 upvotes
tomhuynh
By tomhuynh (Feb 13, 2012)

Just bought mine. Can't wait to play with it.

0 upvotes
Sebmour
By Sebmour (Feb 8, 2012)

I have owned a fuji X10 for the last 2 weeks. I must say that I am impressed. I am glad about the 2 wheels that I can setup like my 5DII and 1DIV. I really like this camera has my pocket camera. The handling is great, menu is simple, clean. The lens is great and see a whole lot of light.

There are 3 things that bother me.
I wish they would have put the information in the optical viewfinder like in the X100.
I wish they could do like Canon and actually show you the exposition in real time. (underexposure or overexposure)
I wish that it would have ND filters since the maximum speed is low in wide apertures.

1 upvote
Wim Banink
By Wim Banink (Jan 27, 2012)

Took it to Paris last week: it's getting better learning how touse it properly:

The X10 is: surprising everybody
good looking
easy(ier) to handle
a GREAT (little) camera

Next city trip will be whitout bulky SLR
(Exif read out shows that the zoom range is just right)

Regards from Holland (sadly enough ;-)

0 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 17, 2012)

enjoy your orbs!

3 upvotes
Wim Banink
By Wim Banink (Jan 23, 2012)

Having used the XZ1 and the X10 for more than 2 months now (as a former G7, 10 and 12 owner) you'll get much better results from both the XZ1 and the X10, build around very good optics, being very different camera's.

Colors on both are better, and being brighter gives them advantages (fe creativity, shallower DOF etc. which is about the same: the XZ1 being slightly brighter vs the X10's bigger sensor).

Both of the "low light"modes work well, though the X10 is less noisy in both EXR and low light mode.
In low light ( one of the main reasons to buy brighter lenses) the XZ! is not as fast or responsive as the X10.
The X10 is solid and responsive (almost Slr like,i think it will cause less use of my bulkier slr sets).

Regarding the so called ORB's of the Fuji; firmware is on the way, but in everyday photography it isn't that obvious as claimed by some:

so start taking pictures, and stop writing about camera's you've never really used, and enjoy..

Best regards from Holland

5 upvotes
Lyteskrybe
By Lyteskrybe (Jan 17, 2012)

Not surprizingly, the Olympus XZ-1 with its Zuiko has the best lens and that's evident in dpreview's widget test-shot comparisons available in its review. The glass is always of utmost importance when it comes to making good photographs and Olympus/Zuiko has always been the most consistent in that department. The rest is just a light-tight box with processing bell and whistles more or less.

4 upvotes
RicohGRDIV
By RicohGRDIV (Jan 26, 2012)

thi sis the first good thing i have heard about this camera

0 upvotes
ohpreis
By ohpreis (Jan 13, 2012)

I don't have any of those but I'm considering getting me the Lumnix LX-5. Camera and price seems right.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
aeneon
By aeneon (Jan 14, 2012)

LX5 is a very good choice.

1 upvote
D Alchemist
By D Alchemist (Jan 6, 2012)

P7000, with firmware updates, crushes all these in the value department: New at Amazon for $229

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
doobob
By doobob (Jan 12, 2012)

You sure are right about that. Can't beat the results you get at that price.

1 upvote
dexter007
By dexter007 (Feb 6, 2012)

Hmm..it was at 229$...unfortunately amazon increase the price by 50$...now it's 279$...I missed the deal....:( :(

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00427ZLRO/ref=s9_simh_gw_p421_d0_g421_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=03BN6WBAK7BPZVYBPV0Y&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938811&pf_rd_i=507846

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
NikonFotoMatt
By NikonFotoMatt (Jan 4, 2012)

LENS HOOD QUESTION: I can't believe no one has picked on the lens hood for this camera. Even Fuji seems unaware of the design flaw.

How many of you are using the (ridiculously pricey) lens hood system?

FLAW: the piece behind the filter threads is slotted. This allows in much dust which ends up on the BACK of the filter. BAD DESIGN!

I would really like my money back ($59) - but realistically will find a jury-rig fix.

Any others notice this gaping flaw? I believe the hood for the X100 is the same.

nikonfotomatt in colorado
http://blog.LITfoto.com

0 upvotes
SweetPotato
By SweetPotato (Jan 4, 2012)

My experience with cameras is enough to choose a path and understand enough to learn. I would like to be able to take a portrait shot in auto and not have it overexposed. Also holiday indoor photos. Outdoor scenes in our travels.
Pretty simple, I am willing to go more in depth if I have to. I had the Canon AE1 before. Now with digital I am using a Canon Power Shot sd1100, when used on auto, I am not happy with the results.
The Canon SX40HS has been recommended to me.
I don't have to stick with Canon, I am open to others.
I have heard once shooting in raw, one does not go back. Wondering if this is something advisable for an everyday shooter?
PSE knowledgeable.
Looking to buy another camera...any suggestions would be helpful

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Inars
By Inars (Jan 16, 2012)

Choose Fuji, if price not important, Nikon - for zoom or Pana for small camera with good fast lens.
Cheap and simple is Nikon P300, if you don't need raw, but prefeer PSAM

0 upvotes
Dabbler
By Dabbler (Jun 27, 2012)

If you're shooting indoors you can't go wrong with the XZ-1. The fastest lens provides the most light. Easy to use and has advanced options for someone wanting to go off-auto. I've been thinking about adding an X10 but waiting to see how the orbs issue shakes out and have heard about slow autofocusing.

0 upvotes
Damage Inc
By Damage Inc (Jan 3, 2012)

The Canon G12 seems the one to go with.
I've been wanting one next to my SLR, so I could sometimes carry one in my pocket for events like concerts and such.
So that I don't have to walk around with a big camera on my neck or on my hip and it doesn't feel so cumbersome.

But it's too bad the price is so ridiculous... I'm not spending that on a secondary compact camera...
Also, what's up with the only 5x zoom?? While other compact Canon-cameras with the same or similar lenses such as the SX100 have 10x zoom.
These are 2 major points that keep me from buying it...

0 upvotes
thomaselsted
By thomaselsted (Jan 4, 2012)

Also worth considering is that while the G12 is a wonderfully reassuring solid compact, it's not exactly pocketable for the events you mention. It's a camera for around the neck or in a satchel bag or something. I've had the G10 and G11 and it IS possible to have it in you pocket if you're not wearing jeans – they are chunky. (hey there, is that a brick in your pocket?)

0 upvotes
tscholent
By tscholent (Jan 4, 2012)

some of the canon G models (such as my G7)does not have RAW mode where as my venerable "Brick" , the G2 (cost me $1100 Canadian way back when...)but renders excellent RAW material to work on (perhaps because it was a simpler Raw engine design ?).My general opinon on taking RAW shots with any compact is if you don't have time for Harvest or Post Production then shoot JPEG or get a entry level SLR with as big a sensor as possible (thats a tall order I admit).Also .I encounter compact enthusiasts on a weekly base that,when asked, say they are disappointed with the zoom quality and IQ thereof.All Digi zoom should be outlawed ...instead users shoud be given a cd to show them how to adjust the settings for particular light conditions (of course one could also say...read the manual first).I think 90% of compact users would be better off with a fast prime wide angle built in and that is why complete beginners more often come up with "keepers".

\\\

1 upvote
Wohlf
By Wohlf (Jan 13, 2012)

People keep thinking about the G12. I don't get it. I think most folks end up taking a lot of shots indoors, especially in the fall and winter. Flash is undesirable...the rooms natural light is what you want to see; so a faster lens and control of flash is critical to having nicely lit indoor shots. The XZ is the clear winner in this regards because it has the best lens (by far) in the group. It is also better for fast action because of this.

1 upvote
pointshooter
By pointshooter (Jan 3, 2012)

My experience is with the G11, but had I to do it over again, I would have no reservations about buying a G12. This article nails it; for the enthusiast, RAW is the way to go, and the G12 is high quality in a convenient package.

Regarding the flip-out screen, like pbailey4, I initially felt it to be an annoyance, but changed my mind as soon as I put my newer T2i on a tripod and had to assume the fetal position to compose a live view shot with a stationary screen.

1 upvote
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Jan 6, 2012)

Ever since my first tilt-swivel screen 7 years ago with the Canon S2 IS, I've never looked back. Using almost any DSLR is absolutely frustrating. I spent 10 days with Sony's A55 and thei version of tilt-swivel with the hinge on the bottom of the camera nearly had me throwing it to the ground in frustration at such horrible design.

Even point-n-shoots are a pain, though my experience with Panny's compact travel zooms with the auto brightening and wide angle screen are an exception. I actually found them pretty usable, for what they are.

I followed the S2 up with the Canon SX 20 and then, after waiting years for a good combination of stellar stills, video & tilt-swivel, I now own a GH2.

Given the neck and neck the G11 and the P7100 go here, I'd lean to the Nikon because of the microphone jack for audio and the longer zoom. The tilt up and down may be good enough for me, but I'd be guessing.

0 upvotes
pbailey4
By pbailey4 (Jan 2, 2012)

The G12 delivers outstanding results - but I absolutely dislike any camera that has the flip out screen - so is back to the G10 for me. Shame the handling and feel of the G12 is spot on.

Generally - I avoid cameras with pop-up flash, more to break and a delay in shooting and while we all seem to desire the optical viewfinder on the high end camera the amount I use it is it really necessary? I am beginning to think not, even the x100 I have while it has a clever viewfinder its placed away from the lens axis as Leica range finder cameras, very off-putting.

0 upvotes
Nudibranco
By Nudibranco (Jan 2, 2012)

I strongly disagree with the conclusions as well.

I have now used the G12, the X10, the XZ1 and I i certainly put the G12 at the bottom of these 3 cameras which have much better lenses (just this is enough to make it more versatile).

Other things completely left out in the review are the amazing versatility of the XZ1 on the remote flash capability, the fantastic optional EVF on the XZ1, the great panorama and profocus functions on the X10, and amazing EXR dynamic ability of the X10. I found the various options retained through the various modes of the X10 a gift for easy setups in many situations. So is the G12 more versatile? Just because of the swivel LCD screen???

I am not the only one to have found the G12 frustrating in the settings and so it seems that Canon G12 is just taking advantage from its older models performance and from marketing.

3 upvotes
doobob
By doobob (Jan 12, 2012)

I agree. I love the X10 and have gotten much better results than my G11, G12 or P7100. I prefer the P7100 over the G12 because of the longer lens on it. That camera also has a lot of functions that you normally do not find on these types of cameras. But I think all of these cameras do a decent job if you know what you are doing. After all, if you take lousy pictures, it doesn't matter what you use, it will still look lousy and maybe be worse because of your flaws.

1 upvote
MainOlyGuy
By MainOlyGuy (Dec 31, 2011)

I'm not an Olympus "Fan Boy" and I don't buy into the idea that a particular camera will make you a good photographer... BUT you did not do your homework.

The Olympus XZ-1 does have an EVF, though it is an accessory. That should have been at least mentioned to keep the article honest and it pushes the cost of the camera up a good bit in doing so. Both points would have helped us in deciding about this particular cameras.

It would have also been of interest to us that the XZ-1 is fully capable of controlling remote flashes and with it's Underwater case.... and remote flashes controls it becomes a very interesting and accessible and useful tool for underwater work.

I know it must be tough to know all of these cameras inside and out but that is the job you took on. These omissions make me wonder what was left out about the other models that would have left us much better informed and shakes my trust in DPReview. You provide a valuable service to us, please respect that and protect it.

1 upvote
jmellas
By jmellas (Jan 14, 2012)

with a login of "MainOlyGuy" it's hard to assert that you are not an Olympus "Fan Boy"... lol Just bugging u.

4 upvotes
BillBingham2nd
By BillBingham2nd (Dec 29, 2011)

While I understand you had to make the cut somewhere, I feel that the highly intuitive handling of the GRD and GXR systems continues to get ignored by the media. Perhaps it's because they do not buy enough ads, perhaps it's because they are targeted towards a more "Professional" market. I don't want to get all grassy knoll and all but damn they are great cameras.

You mention that the GRD has only a prime lens as a major reason you left it out. Again, while not mainstream, there is a dedicated group of users (yes, I am one) that say it's one of the best lenses on the market today.

Nothing comes close in size, handling and quality of glass. I happen to put a black metal 28mm CV bright line finder on the top of mine and turn the LCD. Very retro looking and extends battery life big time when shooting in the cold.

As always a lot of good work in your review.

B2

1 upvote
lacroix75
By lacroix75 (Dec 28, 2011)

I ended up with the X10 as my sidekick. First impressions, the camera looks retro and is certainly made of high quality material. I have not had the chance to test it yet because I'm debating whether I should exchange it for the X100. As far as the other 5 cameras in this review, the top two after the x10 were the LX5 and Nikon 7100. Despite the huge price difference, I still went for the X10 for having a CMOS and the much higher build quality than any of the others. For price and quality alone, I would have probably chose the LX5. The bottom line is that all of these cameras are and will perform about the same, it's really a matter of what system you prefer and what price fits in your budget.

1 upvote
TypoGraff
By TypoGraff (Dec 26, 2011)

I have been looking for a sidekick to my Canon T2i system for about 6 months. Having poured over the reviews here, I keep coming back to the G12. Yes, I would like a bit wider and longer lens, and a bit more aperture range...but, I need a quick grab camera (with RAW and manual capabilities) with an efficient User Interface. I tried using a Panasonic DMC-ZS10 (borrowed), and while the camera takes fine images, negotiating the UI was just too time consuming (when bouncing back and forth from the T2i). I suspect that users who favor other brands will have the same perspective on familial UIs.

0 upvotes
daza
By daza (Dec 27, 2011)

i have a canon t2i (500d) and the fuji x10, and i can tell you that the fuji is better in most of the situations, compared with the t2i with the kit zoom lens.

1 upvote
picthis
By picthis (May 13, 2012)

Me (Canon T2i with kit lenses only) and my girlfriend (G12). A year ago, we took over 3,000+ wedding pictures between both of us, both exchanged cameras at some point, and when all said and done, after editing and brush-up - T2i is the clear winner. I can always tell which camera took what pics, especially those with very nice color tone. There was no doubt. Now when compared to my XZ-1, it isn't so clear, especially in low-light situations. Granted weddings are mostly in low-light situations, but ALOT of situations I use the cameras for are in these challenging light conditions. Of course during daylight is where G12 shines but then, most cameras are good in daylight also.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Dec 26, 2011)

To me, the winner is the XZ-1, with the VF-2 viewfinder. Amazing camera, and even better if you buy the UW housing, that take 67mm Canon 500D close-up lenses. Versatile and easy to use, decent pictures in even rather low light, due to f1.9 and ISO 3200. Steve Huff likes it, and that says a lot in my book!

1 upvote
daza
By daza (Dec 27, 2011)

steve huff also says that the fuji x10 is better.

0 upvotes
tscholent
By tscholent (Jan 4, 2012)

forget about Steve Huff...what's important is what you do best with...even if it is a WWII Brownie!

4 upvotes
andrea_g
By andrea_g (Dec 25, 2011)

Nice article. I read it with interest, even if I totally disagree with the conclusions. In my opinion P7100 and G12 aren't even in the same category of XZ-1, LX5, EX1 and X10. They can't be compared because of their slow lenses. That's all. My preference went to XZ-1 but X10 was noon the shelves ye. LX5 was an option too for its great wideangle. S95 was not an option because of its slow lens at tele end, but I consider it far better than G12. S100 wasn't available yet.

6 upvotes
snake_b
By snake_b (Dec 24, 2011)

I wish DPR did a re-shoot with the EX1, considering that the lens looked decentered in the original review and many complained about that fact. It's not a perfect camera and essentially, Samsung has abandoned it and not fixed weird firmware holes, but it is a good performer.

I've tried most all in the class and in terms of IQ, it absolutely holds its own. The shooting experience is subjective and some of the firmware holes take away from that (no RAW bracketing, remote use during bracketing not allowed, sometimes slow operation, switching to backlit while in RAW results in lockups, so jpeg must be manually selected, and a host of others).

The SRW files are huge (21megs per shot). The hardware is slow. However, the lens is fantastic and so is the swiveling screen.

1 upvote
Robert Deutsch
By Robert Deutsch (Dec 25, 2011)

The first EX1 I got produced images that were sharp in the center, but noticeably softer on the top lef corner than on the top right. I exchanged it; the second sample's images were sharp throughout. I do believe it performs better than the sample DPR reported on. I realize that there's a practical limit to the number of camera samples DPR can be expected to test for a review, but my experience and DPR's experience with the S100 suggests that getting a good sample is something of a crapshoot.

Bob

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Dec 30, 2011)

We looked at more than one EX1 and this one was representative of the ones we'd seen.

It's a fine camera and that lens is nice but it's up against very, very good competitors here and it just falls a little short.

1 upvote
snake_b
By snake_b (Jan 2, 2012)

Thanks for clarifying that.

0 upvotes
tscholent
By tscholent (Jan 4, 2012)

what you wrote kind of confirms the fact that mathematically one can crunch 21 megs into a sensor that's a couple of times smaller then say a full frame sensor but should one expect the $900 compact camera's chip to process that amount of info in the same manner and time?

0 upvotes
Wohlf
By Wohlf (Dec 23, 2011)

You nearly ignored Olympus XZ.

Like a lot of families, our use is often travel, sports and family dinner gatherings. The other cameras are slower and usually need flash indoors; to me this pollutes the results with unnatural lighting. With the XZ, I set the flash indoors to 1/4 or 1/16...perfect results. I have a D90 with a 35mm 1.8 lens and I barely use it! The speed of the XZ lens means that one rarely needs over 400 ISO. With the others you can't use the zoom at all and maintain low light capability and they can't easily control flash intensity. Flare just hasn't been a problem.

For sports I set the aperture to 2.5 and have full zoom. At equivalent zoom, the other cameras are at F5.0 or more and need high ISO, that doesn't work well for sports. A DSLR lens with equivalent speed/zoom would be $1000.

Small for travel and fast lens for sports that stays fast at full zoom. Most importantly you get natural lighting results at family gatherings. I think the XZ is the best choice.

7 upvotes
tscholent
By tscholent (Jan 4, 2012)

I think You did your home work before you bought...smart man!

0 upvotes
EricPT
By EricPT (Jan 27, 2012)

Um, the X10 has a 2.0-2.8 aperture lens and shoots noise free up to ISO 800. Perhaps a little more time spent on homework young man ;-).

2 upvotes
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (Jan 30, 2012)

Yeah and it takes great, orb-free pictures. Maybe YOU should do your homework better.

2 upvotes
Tomek1200GS
By Tomek1200GS (Dec 22, 2011)

CMOS Sensor is better (fuji) or CCD like all others have?? What is the important difference for enduser?

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
nakeddork
By nakeddork (Dec 24, 2011)

CMOS sensors are cheaper to make and use less power. The quality of CCD sensors are a little better in terms of IQ and noise because they are an older technology, however CMOS sensor have advanced significantly and are almost as good.

The difference mainly is cost and power consumption.

0 upvotes
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Jan 6, 2012)

If you plan on shooting video, CCD will render all motion accurately and flashes that are not yours (from other cameras or strobes) will appear full frame, just as we perceive them with our eyes. CMOS fails at both.

But CMOS is far more agile in terms of offering different frame rates, image size readouts from the chip, including "high speed" to offer some slow motion capabilities. CMOS also doesn't deliver a vertical "tear" with super bright lights or the sun.

I can't speak to the difference for stills.

0 upvotes
pocky
By pocky (Dec 21, 2011)

What has happened to the button at the top of the review that allows one to skip between different pages? Typically one expects to read the front page, read the conclusion, go back and read the details and then maybe read the conclusion again. Leafing through the pages consecutively is tiresome and unhelpful, and I really can't be bothered.

3 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Dec 22, 2011)

We're working on improving the navigation in articles, we know the current way of arranging pages isn't ideal. This is an article though, not a review. The way reviews work (and are navigated) hasn't changed.

0 upvotes
shutterbobby
By shutterbobby (Dec 21, 2011)

What happened to the studio comparison tool?

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Dec 21, 2011)

Fixed now, we had a corrupted image. The link works (and always did).

0 upvotes
mainvision
By mainvision (Dec 20, 2011)

Does any of these cameras have GPS? Couldn't find a mention in the reviews. It's an essential feature for travel photography and I won't buy a camera without an onboard GPS.

0 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Dec 21, 2011)

They do not. However, you can use our camera feature search tool to find cameras that fit your size requirements and have GPS: http://www.dpreview.com/products/search/cameras. GPS is under the advanced search options.

0 upvotes
leno
By leno (Jan 13, 2012)

Essential ? hardly it might be a would like but surely the critial thing is to get the image. If you don't know where you are or what you are taking pictures of perhaps you need a map.

0 upvotes
Element42
By Element42 (Dec 18, 2011)

Dumb question to the other owners of the Fuji X10...
Is there any way to get RAW files when using the EXR mode or is that a contradiction it itself since the camera computes EXR output from "triangulating" the RAW data?
Thx for enlightening me.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Dec 19, 2011)

It's not a dumb question. You can certainly shoot RAW and dynamic range compressed jpgs at the same time. If you're asking if the X10 applies the DR adjustment to the RAW file, I don't think so because (a) an altered RAW file wouldn't be a RAW file and (b) you should be able to recover the highlights from a RAW file without any help from the camera. However, the idea behind EXR is still a good one, especially for a point & shoot camera because if you take the experts' advice, you're supposed to pour on the exposure ("expose to the right") and then carefully check the histogram to make sure you haven't gone over the edge & blown the highlights to a point where no post processing can recover them. Great advice, but who wants to worry about that when using a little point and shoot camera?

0 upvotes
increments
By increments (Dec 19, 2011)

Actually the X10 EXR mode isn't like the Active D-Lighting on Nikon or similar. When in EXR mode the camera uses adjacent pixels to make larger ones (goes from 12MP to 6MP)

Read the preview page from dpr

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/fujifilmx10/page3.asp

You can certainly shoot RAW EXR files.

To Element42, I'd suggest asking in the Fuji forum, this tech has been around for years now, and there's several people well versed in it esp. Kim Letkeman.

0 upvotes
Element42
By Element42 (Dec 19, 2011)

Thanks folks. Appreciate your answers.
The camera gives the answer itself. When in EXR mode, it seems that RAW can not be activated (for good reason since the camera does the RAW conversion). However I wonder whether in 6MP mode I automatically benefit from the EXR technology. In let's say the M mode I can activate RAW capture and so I would hope what the RAW file gives me is the benefits from lower noise and higher dynamic range.
I will post to the Fuji forum as well.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Dec 20, 2011)

Yes, you can get EXR data in raw files - I explain how in the article (on the X10 page).

0 upvotes
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Dec 18, 2011)

„The Cameras
[…] There are six cameras on the market which meet these criteria“

Ricoh GRd is another one meeting these criteria. Why not at least mention it?

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Dec 20, 2011)

Because it's not sensibly comparable in terms of everyday 'real world' shooting. It has a fixed, wideangle lens. The GR-D IV is an excellent camera though and we'll be publishing more about it in the new year.

0 upvotes
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Jan 7, 2012)

Thanx for reply!
See your point, yet the quoted sentence is not correct ;) Sorry, must be annoying with all this pendantry from readers...
Good to hear you're planning a review (if that's what you meant)! The usefulness of your review system is unrivalled.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Michael919
By Michael919 (Dec 18, 2011)

The summary of the XZ-1 in this article seems inconsistent with the full on test of the camera where it received much greater praise. Just read the conclusion page of the test.

Where did this lens flare issue come from? I've barely seen mention of it anywhere and only experienced it once or twice, yet this author chose it as the only thing to note in the IQ comparison. Odd article.

4 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Dec 19, 2011)

Flare tends to mar low light shots at wide aperture. Any lamps in th frame or even ones off the frame tend to cause all sort of ghostly light effects. However, few camera tests involve the conditions that incite the problem. Maybe the only workaround is to use lens hoods or narrow the aperture and resort to a tripod. Low light photography is a sort of oxymoron anyway. Astronomers get sharp shots of stars with time exposures, but I have no clue what flare reduction techniques are necessary for 3m reflector telescopes.

0 upvotes
RLPhotoAndImaging
By RLPhotoAndImaging (Dec 18, 2011)

Anyone know when the Canon G13 will be released?

1 upvote
Oliver_B
By Oliver_B (Dec 17, 2011)

Sigma DP1x and DP2x should have been included.

2 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Dec 18, 2011)

Fujifilm X100, Leica X1 and Ricoh GRD III/IV didn't make it either. I guess all of these are considered niche cameras because of their fixed focal lengths.

0 upvotes
Lyle Aldridge
By Lyle Aldridge (Dec 17, 2011)

Great article, Barney! I'm not even in the market for a camera of this class (or didn't think I was), but I found this to be one of the best in a long time. The British usage and spelling ("different to," and "neighbouring") took me back to the early days of the site, too. Thanks.

0 upvotes
rogerslade
By rogerslade (Dec 17, 2011)

The correct use of English is "different from" and never "different to".

3 upvotes
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 18, 2011)

So we're telling the English how to use English, now, are we? What shabby behaviour.

3 upvotes
robenroute
By robenroute (Dec 18, 2011)

@ rogerslade: different from/to/in are all correct English!

2 upvotes
Tonio Loewald
By Tonio Loewald (Jun 3, 2012)

http://oxforddictionaries.com/words/different-from-than-or-to

Different *than* is something of an Americanism, everything else is fine.

0 upvotes
dasar
By dasar (Dec 17, 2011)

well, I do not see the canon S100 in this group. If the IQ of G12 is good, what will the one of S100 be ?

0 upvotes
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 18, 2011)

Yeah, I kinda skipped the rest of it when I saw that neither the S95 or S100 were in there. WTF...

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Dec 18, 2011)

While I think the sensor size, manual controls and RAW capability of S95/S100 are enough to elevate them above the simple P&S cams, I would hesitate to call any camera enthusiast-level if it didn't have a hotshoe for external flashes as well as the option to use a viewfinder.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Dec 20, 2011)

We have a full review of the S100 very nearly finished :)

0 upvotes
Gorrddd
By Gorrddd (Dec 23, 2011)

Barney,

I just finished reading the review on the S100 and found it to be excellent. It resolves the lens decentering issue. People can understand it before throwing down on an otherwise faithful iteration of a great little camera line.

Based upon the scoring criteria I felt that if the camera was re-reviewed by a fresh set of eyes it would actually get slightly higher marks in the area of "Features", which is the second most important category in DPR's scoring process. The S100 feature set is one of its strongest suits and I really feel that the tabulation process did not account for all that it offers. Along those lines I would have expected a score much closer to 75.

Although the S100 is obviously not a gold award winner, I believe that it is a stronger silver award winner than what it was given credit for. I don't fault DPR for that since you guys put an enormous amount of effort into these reviews... to the point of exhaustion.

Gordon

0 upvotes
solsang
By solsang (Dec 17, 2011)

I love the independent PASM settings, finally the x10 allows me to change immediately between varied shooting situations!

P is for normal shooting, everything at auto (speed turned up in light scenes)
A when using a tripod outdoor, high aperture and low iso, IS off
S for moving subjects, high shutter speed and high (auto)iso plus low aperture
M at fixed lighting situations with best aperture for sharpness on base iso

Having these settings ready makes my workflow much more easy, though i can understand that people who have different work situations would like settings to be dependent; i suggest fujifilm make a option to choose either setting!

1 upvote
RichGK
By RichGK (Dec 20, 2011)

Did the reviewer mean that the settings reset to defaults when you change, or that the settings reset to what they were the last time you used that setting?

0 upvotes
Thomas Traub
By Thomas Traub (Dec 17, 2011)

Dear Santa Claus,

for christmas I wish a full review of the P7100 and the X10.

Please please please.

Thank you
Thomas

PS.: I belive in you ;-)

2 upvotes
reality_check
By reality_check (Dec 17, 2011)

Alberto,

For me, spelling and typo issues are so minor and lame. I focus more on content. But, that's just me!

8 upvotes
Alberto Battelli
By Alberto Battelli (Dec 18, 2011)

Content is king, no doubt, but one of the pleasures of reading dpreview - for me - has always been the care with which articles were written, as well as the general level of most discussions in it. Getting careless is a first step towards degradation. Sounds dramatic I know, but there are standards for a reason.

4 upvotes
cheetah43
By cheetah43 (Dec 17, 2011)

Wish Panasonic come up with an LX6 having a fixed flash unit where "LUMIX" is written on the LX5 body, an EVF where the popup flash is and a less glaring LCD.

0 upvotes
Alberto Battelli
By Alberto Battelli (Dec 16, 2011)

I have never read such a poorly written article from dpreview before. Could you at least spell check?

1 upvote
NetMage
By NetMage (Dec 16, 2011)

Typo, Picture caption, page 3: highligthts

0 upvotes
markmosk
By markmosk (Dec 16, 2011)

I love reading the comments as much as the educated reviews. What other forums have such well informed and opinionated people? I'm always left thinking that everyone has their own criteria so a combative tone (sometimes found here) is a little silly.

...the criteria I'm left with after all of this is shutter release speed. At the end of the day, you should be able to get a good image from any of these but it's the ongoing issue of shutter lag that still gets me. It's avoided with DSLRs and I'm still gonna always take the most shots with my iphone (best camera=onya) even though it's delay in the new OS and when you've got a lot on the phone kills me.

So who's got some real world thoughts on which of these as quickest shutter release/bursts/record times. Didn't see it in there (maybe it is).

Thanks.

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Dec 16, 2011)

Imaging Resource always seem to go large on shutter lag and other timings. eg:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NIKONV1/NIKONV1A6.HTM

0 upvotes
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 18, 2011)

There are few new model digicams, even compacts, with any noticeable half-press to full-press lag.

0 upvotes
RLPhotoAndImaging
By RLPhotoAndImaging (Dec 18, 2011)

As a long time film/digital SLR user, I too wish for better reaction times from compact cameras. I'm hoping that our awaiting S100 and the new G13 will be better in that respect.
Renard: True, but it is the time getting to the completion of the half press point that's always an issue with non-DSLRs.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
acrockett149
By acrockett149 (Dec 22, 2011)

The LX5 has fast autofocus after the new firmware. Check it out.

0 upvotes
PicOne
By PicOne (Dec 16, 2011)

The X10 is NOT 10mp.. it's a 12mp camera. I'm referring to top of X10 page (page 3)

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
1 upvote
techmine
By techmine (Dec 16, 2011)

I agree with the reviewer - IQ is best in X10 and Canon G12(looking at the sample galleries of all). X10 even better in situations where you have to just turn the dial to EXR mode.
PS: I own X10 and I felt that wow factor when I compared out of camera shots from my previous compact cameras including SX10IS, P300, Oly- E-PL1. Long time ago I had a Sony 1/1.7" CCD W series P&S and those images were just brilliant. Sadly there is no Sony here to compare. All they are thinking about is, NEX.

0 upvotes
brittonx
By brittonx (Dec 16, 2011)

"For the purposes of this roundup, I'm restricting my coverage to those compact cameras which offer full manual control over exposure, are capable of shooting raw files, and have flash/accessory hotshoes. There are six cameras on the market which meet these criteria, and all six are covered, but the fullest treatment is reserved for those cameras which offer optical viewfinders (and arguably the ultimate in enthusiast-friendly ergonomics) in addition to their rear LCD screens:"

You missed two cameras that meet all the criteria you listed:
Sigma DP1
Sigma DP2

2 upvotes
JayJackson
By JayJackson (Dec 17, 2011)

Including the DP1 is unnecessary as it is 3 years old and has been superceded by the DP2. Just like the Canon G11 etc.

0 upvotes
spalbird
By spalbird (Dec 17, 2011)

The DP1 has a 28mm equivalent lens and the DP2 a 41mm. Therefore, they can hardly supercede each other. Both cameras integrate an APSC size sensor. You most likely would like them under good light conditiosns, unfortunately this is not very applicable to situations where Compacts are usually used...

0 upvotes
JayJackson
By JayJackson (Dec 18, 2011)

41mm equiv., yeah that's limiting! The DP1 is an interesting camera and still available but quite expensive.

0 upvotes
Nick Carrigan
By Nick Carrigan (Dec 16, 2011)

Sorry DPReview but you haven't convinced me to shoot in RAW.

You've claimed that shooting in JPEG is a terrible experience. Could it also be a fact that certain companies just have a poor JPEG engine design?

Olympus has created a truly excellent JPEG engine. It isn't just in the XZ-1 but also the E-P/E-PL series as well. Why can't other manufacturer's do this?

Most P&S cameras have awful JPEG engines that can't even compete with an Apple iPhone image. If Apple can make this work, then certainly a *camera* company should be able to -- (a leer towards Canon/Nikon.)

If everyone would invest the time to create a good JPEG engine then RAW mode really wouldn't be necessary for the average user. Sure, RAW has some advantages but it shouldn't be a requirement to justify the camera's IQ.

Personally, I find it sad when I read a review that says "well, the JPEG engine sucks but RAW is great. So, we'll give it a Gold award."

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
alan e jones
By alan e jones (Dec 16, 2011)

Hi
couldn't agree more..i don't have time to Process every image
JPG's are important to me if the JPG is crap i don't buy the camera simple eh ! I own Olympu ZX1 Canon 5D2 and 50D all produce good jpg's in my opinion !

4 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Dec 17, 2011)

I used to agree with this sentiment.

However, since converting to Lightroom my workflow does not care if it's RAW or JPEG so given that both formats require the same level of effort, I'll take the RAW any day for better post processing flexibility.

3 upvotes
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 18, 2011)

Some of us don't really want anything complicated enough to call a "workflow". Just want to shoot and use (i.e., upload somewhere)

6 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Dec 18, 2011)

If it's important enough to get the shot might as well check your white balance at the time and capture in Jpeg.

0 upvotes
RLPhotoAndImaging
By RLPhotoAndImaging (Dec 18, 2011)

IMO, those who need "convincing" to shoot RAW will best be served to stick with jpg. You can lead a horse to water, but...

3 upvotes
john Clinch
By john Clinch (Jan 1, 2012)

I just spent loads of money on a camera with an advanced sensor. I know I'll use a file format that throws away all that extra information...

I've never looked back once form using RAW. I think the only thing that neeeds an extra step is outputing jpegs for photo books. But before I used RAW i pp the jpgs any way

Lightroom uploads straight to facebook and flickr

When I'm out walking I'd far rather snap and correct latter than miss the view and get left behind worrying about white balance

0 upvotes
MyLittleEye
By MyLittleEye (Jan 15, 2012)

To my mind comparing Raw with JPEG equates to comparing Negative with Polaroid -
Lightroom has been the most rewarding investment I've made; simultaneously simplifying and accelerating my "workflow" managing my files, cataloging and, with .DNG, embedding descriptive metadata into the files themselves, applying image adjustments and embedding them non-destructively. If one's serious enough about photography to invest in a raw capable camara then I see little excuse for overlooking raw's (DNG's) numerous advantages.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Alberto Battelli
By Alberto Battelli (Dec 16, 2011)

Please help me decide. I already have the Samsung, LX5, and Oly, and for Xmas I just know I'm getting the X10. I can see Santa with my X10 in his bag, travelling.
The question is, what do I do in January, when I should really only keep two at the most? Pick two for me.

0 upvotes
JCB123
By JCB123 (Dec 16, 2011)

Keep the two that have an 'X' and a '1' in their name.

2 upvotes
iudex
By iudex (Dec 16, 2011)

What makes someone buying third camera of the same type? What do you do with them? I understand having 2 different kinds of camera (DSLR + CSC or compact), but having 3 almost identical cameras is beyond my understanding.;-)

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Alberto Battelli
By Alberto Battelli (Dec 17, 2011)

I know, I agree. It's a transitional phase I guess. Ever since I dumped all my heavy glass and gone "compact" ( my smallest camera is the Oly Epl2), I seem to be on a quest for the perfect small package. Which of of course doesn't exist and possibly never will..

0 upvotes
RLPhotoAndImaging
By RLPhotoAndImaging (Dec 18, 2011)

So you dump your DSLR gear and replace it with many mediocre compacts that you know you'll hardly ever be happy with? Ummm, ok?

0 upvotes
Michael_13
By Michael_13 (Dec 18, 2011)

Alberto, first of all, you should go and see a doctor, because you suffer from "compacts-buying disease". :-)

I like my XZ-1 a lot, but it is too similar to the X10. So I advise you to keep either EX1 or LX5: They ad 24mm, one with good video, the other with a tilting screen.

1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Dec 19, 2011)

I picked one and got to know it really, really well. Read the manual, set my preferences for various shortcuts and controls, and now it fits me.

You should make sure you have exhausted the capabilities of one of those excellent cameras before believing that you should buy another one. Much less a third.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 286
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