Nikon D4 & D800: What do the Professionals Think?

It's been a busy couple of months for Nikon, during which the Japanese camera maker has announced two new models, the D4, a 16MP professional workhorse intended for hard use in a wide range of shooting environments, and the 36.3MP D800 - the long-awaited successor to the 12MP D700. With these two models Nikon has introduced some significant new technology to its high-end DSLR lineup, perhaps the most significant of which is a very impressive-looking video specification. Both cameras offer full HD video with live audio monitoring and the option to record uncompressed footage to a harddrive via the built-in HDMI port.

As far as the D4 is concerned, the improved video specification is arguably the most significant change to the spec sheet compared to the D3S. It gets a small resolution boost, from 12MP to 16, and improved high ISO performance but other refinements are relatively subtle. The D800 on the other hand (and it's near-twin the D800E) breaks through a major barrier, offering a currently unmatched pixel count of 36.3MP for $3000 - half the cost of the D4. Despite the cost and resolution disparity though, the two cameras have a lot in common. 

Click here for our detailed first impressions (including samples) of using the D4
And here for our  overview of the Nikon D4
And here for our  in-depth preview of the Nikon D800

Following our announcement and preview content of these cameras, we wanted to get a feel for what professional Nikon shooters think. We asked four photographers, whose work and expertise spans a wide variety of genres to tell us what they think of the D800 and D4. Our own in-depth reviews will follow in the coming weeks.

The Sports and News Photographer: Leon Neal

I've been waiting for the D4 for some time but, unlike previous product refreshes, the D3s had never really left me crying out for anything apart from improved video. I was pretty sure that full HD video would be included in the D4,and handling a pre-production camera it was a real pleasure to finally see "1080p" displayed on the screen while shooting video.

August 2011. The morning after serious violence in central London which resulted in the destruction of several homes and businesses. Shot with a Nikon D3S and AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8

In my normal stills shooting though it's the little things that make a difference. The D4's screen, for example now has a resin coating between the plates which, Nikon claims, will eliminate fogging when the cameras have got wet. This might not sound significant but I have two D3 bodies that have never recovered from shooting one particularly wet job, so I'm pleased to see that changes have been made. 

Likewise, the D4's time-lapse feature takes the maths out of the process, simply asking you how often you want to shoot and then displaying how long the finalised clip will be, depending on the interval that you currently have set. Not only that, but on completion, the D4 stitches the sequence together and outputs a high-quality movie file. No more messing around in Quicktime Pro...

I haven't been able to shoot any images on a production camera yet but just from looking at pictures on the LCD screen I could see that the noise levels produced in the higher ISO ranges were definitely improved, even compared to the D3s. Having shot quite a bit of low-light sport recently, I'm impressed with what the D3s can produce but with the D4 I'm looking forward to shooting at ISO 12,800 hopefully without needing to worry about noise affecting detail.

I honestly can't wait to use the D4 in anger at the London Olympics later this year if it's as good as it looks so far. The D4 has come along at a good time for me because I'll be shooting swimming and several other indoor events so I'll need the best image quality possible at high ISO settings. The 2012 Olympics will also be 'wired' so I'm really pleased that Nikon has added an Ethernet port to the D4. Also, as a regular user of the WT-4 wireless transmitter, it's great to hear about the new smaller-form WT-5 unit. Less gear to carry is always a plus point, no matter what other features it has!'

After six months' planning Leon got only a few minutes at an effective focal length of 850mm to get this shot of Prince William and Kate Middleton's kiss after the Royal Wedding in April 2011.

This image was shot using a Nikon D3X with 600mm lens and 1.4x teleconverter.  
This image of the World Short-track Speed Scating Championships was shot in March 2011 using a Nikon D3s and 14-24mm f2.8 lens.

As for video, I regularly shoot 'webclips' for my employer Agence France-Presse which involve creating short 1-2 minute clips that can be used online to support text and photo stories. I've also shot footage for broadcast though, at last year's riots in inner London, for example. I like the fact that video is more tightly integrated into the D4 than the D3S and I'm really pleased to see that as well as full HD output, a headphone output has now been added for live audio monitoring. It's such a simple thing but the video teams at AFP were always astounded that the D3S didn't allow me to monitor my audio in any way. As well as 24, 25 and 30 frames per second, the D4 also allows 60 frames per second at the reduced 720p quality, which will allow me to capture slow-motion footage in camera - potentially very useful.

As for the D800, I'm really looking forward to getting my hands on one. A more compact form factor, incredible pixel count and full HD video makes it very very appealing for general-purpose stills and video work. I've always loved the size of the D700 and if the D800 can maintain D3-like image quality with three times the pixel count, it could feasibly end up being the more exciting of the two cameras. Bring it on!

Leon Neal is a staff photographer for international news agency Agence France-Presse. Leon shoots everything that comes his way including news, sport, features, fashion and live music. Although mainly based in the UK, foreign assignments include the revolution in Libya and the Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

To see more of his work visit www.leonneal.com 

The Multimedia Photojournalist: Dan Chung

The Nikon D4 and D800 are very interesting to me. I was running both Canon and Nikon systems side by side for ages - Nikon for stills and Canon for stills and video, but a couple of months ago I finally got rid of my Nikon bodies, mainly because I just wasn’t really shooting on them. I kept all my Nikon glass though, so if I decide to get another Nikon body I’ll be ready to start shooting again immediately. 

One of the main things I liked about the D700 for stills was it's faster frame rate compared to the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. The D800 is a slower camera than the D700, but the biggest draw compared to the 5D Mark II is the more advanced video specification.  

Canon EOS5DmkII, One night in Beijing (shot with Nikon lenses). from Dan Chung on Vimeo.

Both Canon and Nikon are producing great cameras now that you can shoot excellent video footage with. The difference obviously is that Canon is better established in that field. The D4 and D800 are still unknown quantities for now, but I know I could go on a broadcast shoot with a Canon EOS C300 tomorrow, and mix the footage in with video from the 1 DX or 5D Mark II and it would work.

This is why right now I would consider myself a Canon shooter. Until to the launch of the D4 and D800 there’s been no other choice for DSLR video really. Sony’s DSLR video stuff doesn’t quite cut it, and the Nikon D3S didn’t really cut it either - it didn’t have enough video resolution, the frame rates weren’t there, and frankly the image quality in video mode just wasn’t up to the same level as the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. As a stills camera the D3S is lovely but right now I need a video camera that shoots stills, not a stills camera that shoots video.

Shot on the Nikon D700 and AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8, this image is part of a 2009 case study of Hasina Begum, Char Atra, Bangladesh, taken by Dan for Oxfam. 

That's why I think the new Nikons look really interesting. I will definitely be looking at the D4 and D800 in more detail because I can’t afford not to. But I’d say the same thing about the Canon EOS-1 DX as well. There are a couple of key features missing from the Canon EOS-1 DX though that the Nikons have got - a headphone jack, and clean HDMI output. The headphone jack is something that I’ve been asking both Canon and Nikon to put on their DSLRs for a long time, and I hope that it’ll become a standard feature.

I think we’re getting to the stage now where the video functionality isn’t something that a multimedia photojournalist would switch systems for, as I've been forced to do in the past. So if you’re a Nikon shooter and you’re deeply invested in Nikon then there’s probably no need any more to go to Canon purely for video. Whatever system you use, video is definitely here to stay in DSLRs. Even for broadcast and movie professionals using RED or Cinema EOS equipment, cameras like the D4, D800 or EOS-1 DX could potentially be really interesting as B units or C units. The form factor is nice and compared to the pro video equipment they're attractively priced, too.

I need to see more footage though - only when I'm confident that video quality from the D800 and D4 is comparable to what I've seen from the EOS-1D X and whatever replaces the 5D Mark II will I really be able to decide which works for me. I've got some tough decisions to make but I'll definitely be spending some money soon! 

Award-winning photojournalist and videomaker Dan Chung made his name as a photographer for The Guardian and Reuters news agency, and has since pioneered the use of DSLRs in filmmaking, particularly in news coverage. Dan lives and works in China, but travels the world on assignment.

Dan also runs the industry blog www.dslrnewsshooter.com 

Click here to read page 2 of this article, Nikon D4 & D800: What do the Professionals Think?

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Comments

Total comments: 391
123
Jules Design
By Jules Design (8 months ago)

I use my D800 mostly in a studio for product photography. No multi shutter burst, I am very gently with my camera. in one year MY D800 BROKE 4 TIMES!!!!!!! I like how this camera performs but man it is fragile\ ort poorly made- moreover Nikon is SUPER SLOW to fix my camera or to get me a replacement.

0 upvotes
Daniel Stehura
By Daniel Stehura (5 months ago)

My D800 has been on my Yamaha Scooter driving along the Cho Praya River in Thailand for 8 months. All over Chiang Mai 2 times and Chiang Rai, Saigon and in the mountains of Vietnam on a motorbike and the pictures are Tack Sharp and never a failure. It's never been dropped and I put it in a plastic bag when it rains. I keep on mostly a 24-70mm F2.8 for my Temple, head shots and street candids. 36mp is not enough if you want Ansel Adams 8x10 resolution. Internet shooters and children can get by with 16mp.

0 upvotes
Shunda77
By Shunda77 (Nov 1, 2012)

It really puts the 'megapixel pirates' (one eyed of course) on DPR forums into perspective.

16mp is more than enough.

0 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (11 months ago)

So true. I've used a Nikon D700 (lovely camera with plenty of quality) tried using a Nikon D600 - too small - didn't impress. Yesterday I attended a wedding (I now do wedding cars but have over 10 years as a PRO wedding photographer so know my way around cameras a bit) spoke to their photographer using a D800 - I know the guy and fully expected him to gush on how brilliant it is. No, he said he didn't like it for a number of reasons (which he didn't share with me) but he did say he HATES the huge files which are taking him far far too much time to deal with....said he was going to upgrade to a D4 soon because of the smaller files and that its a PRO tool (his back up camera is a D3) - interesting...

1 upvote
Daniel Stehura
By Daniel Stehura (5 months ago)

Sad Joe, I upgraded my RAM in my MacBookPro to 16gb and the 50Mb files download quickly. To bump it up faster I will install a terabyte SSD now the price has come down and you can find one.
He can shoot at 24mp by going into the menu. What he hates is his job not his camera thats why he could not answer you. The D800 is one of the best out there. It's the photographer not his "TOOL"

0 upvotes
WolfyWho
By WolfyWho (Oct 30, 2012)

It would be nice to see a follow up to this article. It would be interesting to hear the same photographers thoughts after using the cameras for quite some time now. Were the cameras everything they had hoped/thought they'd be, etc.?

2 upvotes
nguyenthanhhieuthanson
By nguyenthanhhieuthanson (Aug 10, 2012)

hãy đăng bài nhận xét chuyên sâu về Nikon D4

0 upvotes
DaMatta
By DaMatta (Jun 16, 2012)

I'm a photografer or at least I like to think so. All I want is to take the best photos and not damn videos.
Please by a camcorder for your's boliwood movies.

1 upvote
munro harrap
By munro harrap (Apr 16, 2012)

My D800 returned due to BAD autofocus errors. D800 excellent machine if it works, BUT Face recognition must work (mine did not even once!) because there is no selection possible of moveable groups of AF points YOU control.(as D200) There is only either auto AF or single point AF (and manual) which involves one press in right direction for each sensor space move.Like a mouse click- Unuseably slow. Thus Auto AF MUST be accurate, Exposure too as grain/noise ramps up very quickly. You CANNOT use noise reduction without losing all that resolution, I kid you not. You must not underexpose. Capture NX2 destroys all resolution if you apply just one unit of NR
You cannot then sharpen a destroyed image. You have been warned. Results can be magnificent IF technique is also impeccable. Be prepared to wait, and then some- you might get a dodgey one. Many old lenses are just fine. A sharp lens is a sharp lens on any sensor but focus accuracy at 36MP is key.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Hans80
By Hans80 (Mar 28, 2012)

D4 AF-ON Button is Activating VR...this should not be so in my opinion. Autofocus should be independent of VR. I can not think of any practical reason to combine these two functions. Was this an oversite by Nikon? Not happy with this but love the camera overall.

0 upvotes
shutterbug2k13
By shutterbug2k13 (Mar 26, 2012)

Why even bother asking Dan Chung for an opinion when he didn't have any? Seriously?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
bashlal
By bashlal (Mar 16, 2012)

i do not find Leon Neal's pictures any better than an amateur shooters photos taken with any point and shoot camera. i have done a lot better job with my D3s that all the stuff that you have posted above. mr. dans video could have been lot better without the spitting scene of the person sitting on his rickshaw. i decline to accept the opinion

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Mike Oo
By Mike Oo (Mar 30, 2012)

Lol, I had a look at your "galleries." Your stuff is sh1t. Learn to shoot before you run your mouth.

10 upvotes
JoeAmateur
By JoeAmateur (Apr 30, 2012)

Even though what you say is true, at least he posts something; all you do is troll.

3 upvotes
DaMatta
By DaMatta (Jun 16, 2012)

I agree with bashlal, even the photo of that burned building is sh1t. I have made a mutch better work, at age 8, from my old school.

1 upvote
calebkam
By calebkam (Mar 6, 2012)

although D800 have much more MP,D4 is more reasonable to buy
D800's continue burst is really slow........4FPS in FX/6FPS in DX+Battery Grip
D4 11fps(AE-AF lock)
i would like to buy D4...

0 upvotes
Poss
By Poss (Mar 3, 2012)

I'm an Internationally Insignificant Photographer... Does anyone want to hear what I have to say about a camera I yet have to use and most likely won't buy ?

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
11 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Mar 8, 2012)

That's incredibly rude and you should be ashamed.

6 upvotes
bashlal
By bashlal (Mar 16, 2012)

i would value your opinion better than the ones posted in this article. actually in todays world anyone can pick up a camera and become a professional photographer. shoot few celebrities doing some weird stuff and people will start listening to you. this is not photography. its all about hype.

3 upvotes
Michele Kappa
By Michele Kappa (Mar 20, 2012)

Actually photography as a profession is not always about art, you know... it's mainly shooting in extremely poor light conditions, and "bringing the bread home", I don't know if you can see the point here...
Concert photos are incredibly hard to shoot without proper equipment, so yes, a professional photographer has to spare several thousand € on equipment, and no, not anyone can do it correctly; which in this case means being technically sound, not necessarily artistically senseful.
And by the way, I value much more this kind of review/article which discusses objective techincal limits and how to overpass them, than a rant about "artistic sense" and thousands of hateful opinions on "objectivity" in beauty.
Keep on the good work Barney, remember trolls are plenty here. :)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
cr7
By cr7 (Apr 4, 2012)

Yes...proceed.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
munro harrap
By munro harrap (Feb 28, 2012)

For better handheld photos with longer lenses it is also worth remembering that because you can crop from the 36MP images the D800 creates you can use faster lenses for more speed and less shake and then crop. My 180mm f2.8 IFED becomes a 16MP 270mmf2.8 on the D800 in APS-C mode, with the greater depth of field that APS-C yields ( the DOF of a 180mm but the reach of a 270mm).

Just like a nokia!

0 upvotes
EcoPix
By EcoPix (Mar 1, 2012)

Crop a little 70-200 2.8 on the D800 to 500mm and you still get about 8mp, plenty for print or web if it's sharp. A 70-500mm f2.8 over my shoulder? I can live with that.

1 upvote
hondadriver
By hondadriver (Mar 5, 2012)

Yes, but those are not full frame pixels, but more like 8mpx APS-C, and you can get almost the same thing with the cheapest body :)

0 upvotes
fadeslayer
By fadeslayer (Mar 9, 2012)

I don't really think so... if you crop, you still keep pixel size, so if D800 would be a full frame camera (and IT IS) cropping (not resizing) still keeps full frame spec

0 upvotes
NikonsForLife
By NikonsForLife (Jul 27, 2012)

I think you have a better understanding of the real issues. You pick the camera that fits what you do. No one camera can do it all and the D800 is much more like a medium format camera than a fast sports camera. If you do sports, low-light photography, then go for the D4. I want the D800 for outdoor still subjects---interior photography as well as outdoor artistic work. I don't need a fast burst rate nor dramatically capable low-light capabilities.

I have spoke with two very reknowned outdoor photographers, both pros, and they love the D800E!

2 upvotes
munro harrap
By munro harrap (Feb 28, 2012)

Those who get a D4 will appreciate very quickly just how much more resolution is there compared to 12MP on a D3 or D700.

This is what I discovered moving from a 1Ds (11Mp) to a 1Ds Mk II (16.7 Mp), which I still have.

The ONLY reason to get a D800 is for the same increased levels of detail in wide-angle lens views, because they require so much more magnification .A 14-24mm gives you that full frame or 21-36mm again at f2.8 on APS-C crop, and in video you have a wide-rangeing wide-angle; and you can treat the 24-85mm or the 24-70mm the same way.I dont see any advantage over 16MP for the longer lenses as they are at present used by pros, but it'll come!!

The worry is that noise will cancel any gain- I shall not let go my 1Ds2 until I am certain there has progress been some!

That said if only you could change settings during shooting in video......hmmm

0 upvotes
Vizart
By Vizart (Feb 28, 2012)

Wow, whats with all the negativity, I have been work in the field of photography long enough to appreciate any of my fellow photographer taken the time to share their insight, some of you need to chill a bit here.

Cameras are either toys or tools depending who uses them, I for one would rather listen to someone who uses them on a daily basis than from an arm chair photographer, I found the comments to be objectives and helpful.

Technical specs sheets are always there if you plan on trippin' on them, me I prefer real world feedback.

BTW, the Nokia has 41-megapixel??? great news!, what can I tell you, just not the right thread for bragging about this, but it did make me smile, so thanks

4 upvotes
SergeyMS
By SergeyMS (Feb 27, 2012)

I think that time of heavy bricks is over. Both of cameras have this disadvantage before new generation like SONY NEX 3-5-7, and others pocket-size cameras with good quality of picture. But Nikon's controls are the most convenient I ever seen. I like Nikon for these two things - controls and reliability. But I am very disappointed with quality of image of my D7000... Last years, I think, Canon and Nikon have lost their advantage as the most prestigious camera manufacturers.

0 upvotes
dorsetman1980
By dorsetman1980 (Jun 1, 2012)

Most people when they start with a D7000 get soft images. If you actually learn more about your camera and functions you will find that its actually a very good camera indeed. I use a D3s and D800 but also have a D7000 as a backup and its a superbly capable camera. Learn what you can do by adjusting your settings and invest in some decent glass and you will then see what your camera is really capable of.

4 upvotes
NikonsForLife
By NikonsForLife (Jul 27, 2012)

Hear Hear! Absolutely on point, sir!!

0 upvotes
xdaflame
By xdaflame (Feb 27, 2012)

I would not give up my D3s for a D4. The article and its "pros" fail to mention the decreased battery life of the D4 due to stupid regulations; the loss of the zoom dial (opting instead for the D700 +/- zoom keys); the addition of a Canon-style joystick; and it not accepting two CF cards, requiring one CF card and one XQD card.

If you have a D3s or even a D3, I say keep it, and go for the D800E and a good lens. That way you have the D800E for video, landscape and macro (as well as a more compact travel camera), and you keep the D3/D3s for photojournalism, sports and event photography. For the cost of a D4 you can get a D800E and some good glass, like the 24/f1.4G.

2 upvotes
davidjewels
By davidjewels (May 25, 2012)

You hit it on the nail!!!!I so can't wait to get my hands on the 24mm f1.4G even though the 85mm f1.4G and the 35mm f1.4g have both been tempting me a lll day and night!

1 upvote
Geniet
By Geniet (Feb 27, 2012)

Just as a matter of interest, but the Nokia 808 PureView a mobile phone has amongst other features a build-in 41-megapixel camera.

0 upvotes
NikonsForLife
By NikonsForLife (Jul 27, 2012)

41 mpx on such a tiny sensor seems overkill and should produce an awful lot of noise, don't you think?

0 upvotes
JB NI
By JB NI (Feb 27, 2012)

I find it so annoying when people post things like "shame on you DP" for posting this article. The website clearly caters to all sections of the photography market and for people like myself who are amateur's that don't spend that much time reading/researching what is just a hobby, the view of a professional or someone who spends a lot of time doing it and has good knowledge of photography is actually interesting. Yes the people interviewed don't actually have the new cameras in question but I was still interested to see what it is that photographers who shoot certain genres look for in a camera and what new features of the cameras they find exciting.

If reading the article wasted so much of your time as numerous people have stated then why did you read it all and even more so if your time is clearly so precious why did you waste even more of it posting a negative comment that is an even bigger waste of space than an article that at least some people can take some enjoyment from.

11 upvotes
i3aer
By i3aer (Feb 28, 2012)

Spot on

3 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Feb 29, 2012)

I second to that.

0 upvotes
David G72
By David G72 (Feb 27, 2012)

Duh, this is just stupid...this article is pretty much meaningless - I agree with what everybody said here.

0 upvotes
MPA1
By MPA1 (Feb 26, 2012)

This always makes me laugh.

A professional photographer is a person who earns his living from photography, not some sort of photographic demigod with inherent genius.

Some of the finest photographers I know are amateurs - i.e. they have day jobs (and why wouldn't they? Photography is not a great way to earn a living in terms of earning capacity when compared to accountancy or the law!).

I make my living from photography and it really is hard, and whilst my clients have no cause for complaint I certainly do not believe that professional status confers automatic genius on me. Most of the time I think it calls into question my sanity, to be honest!

We may have some better skills than many amateurs but mainly because we get a whole lot more practice. One likes to believe that there is some talent as well, of course, but practice is what refines talent like nothing else can.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
22 upvotes
tonganqn
By tonganqn (Feb 27, 2012)

I totally agree. Well said.

0 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Feb 27, 2012)

I agree, as with most any other creative field, its about 1% true genius/talent and about 99% practice/hardwork/experience.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 28, 2012)

I actually don't understand the problem many in these comments seem to have with DPR's use of the word "professional". Who better than to talk about what these cameras might mean for their photography? Why do amateurs always feel so threatened and cop attitude at such characterizations. There are different tiers as well of pros. Sherry shooting kids portraits at Chucky Cheese is technically a pro, as is Stan, a staff photographer for The Guardian or BBC. But...

DPR never said anything about genius, just that photographers such as these, who work in multimedia environments are particularly well suited to talk about the two new Nikons.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
dorsetman1980
By dorsetman1980 (Jun 1, 2012)

I hate the word professional, its so misleading. What makes that person a professional. I know many amateurs better than most that call themselves professional. I earn money taking photos but will never call myself anything other than a photographer.

I think the article is an interesting one and addresses some good points. I don't think slagging off opinions is in anyway constructive. Lets be objective.

1 upvote
lys
By lys (Feb 26, 2012)

What a waste of my time reading this. Shame on you, DP. Who's bright idea to publish this.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 27, 2012)

Fine. Then go ahead: author and submit your own idea of something worth reading.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 28, 2012)

This is a free website. If an article doesn't interest you, don't read it. But the only one who should feel anything remotely close to shame is you for such a silly comment.

I'm sure everyone who has purchased a D800 (or D4) enjoys reading anything related to it. If the article wasted your time, oh well. Nobody made you read it and you don't pay a penny for this content. Why do you think you are owed something by DPR? You don't pay a subscription fee for free hosting of your images, forums, and reviews. DPR has the right to publish whatever they think might interest the majority of us or whatever they feel like.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Feb 29, 2012)

Shame on you. You probably should leave this forum and spend time on learning how to take photos.

0 upvotes
dorsetman1980
By dorsetman1980 (Jun 1, 2012)

I think you need to go and learn to be objective. As you can see your opionion is far less popular than the article. Shame on you i say!

0 upvotes
Azra
By Azra (Feb 26, 2012)

Im looking forward to getting my hands on a d800. I shoot mostly editorial and the only thing I didnt like about my d700 was the pixel count and the lack of viewfinder masking for 5:4 crops.

The extra pixels will be great- I usually shoot wide to allow editors more freedom to add copy. I've often had images that were comssioned as a single page be turned into a double spread, as they liked the images and space.

Now, with 36 mp not 12mp there will be more freedom for me and my editors to use a wide shot and crop in to make a headshot, etc. without loss of print 'quality'.

Pureists may moan about this, but when you have 10 min to shoot a celebrity, and have to spend a few minutes warming them up to get them ready to shoot, this kinda convience may sound lazy, but worth the cost.
Also don't forget Arbus was a massive fan or cropping to find 'the image within the image' too ;)

To me the d800 will be a winner, and i am already pleased I pre-ordered it the morning it was announced.

2 upvotes
PeakAction
By PeakAction (Feb 26, 2012)

This was a nigh-useless article. I thought I was going to read the opinions of someone who'd actually handled them.

5 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Feb 25, 2012)

Many of us have 2-3 year old D700 and D3 series cameras which are doing a fine job today, work or play. If one of these two new cameras doesn't appeal, keep using what you brought with you. It's still doing a great job. Wait 3 years for the next pro-grade releases. Your D3 or D700 will still be fine.

4 upvotes
Azra
By Azra (Feb 26, 2012)

100 % agree - if you are happy with a d700, keep it. As I just posted at the top..... I loved using the D700 to get my work done (i won my first award of several shooting on the d700) but i craved more pixels for convience.
As a full-timer the d800 is a no brainer, for MY WORK. For play, I don't see why people are moaning in reports about not wanting 36mp... it's like the hobbyists who complained a d3x was too expensive for them ;)

0 upvotes
SiliconVoid
By SiliconVoid (Feb 27, 2012)

Because you won't be shooting the D800 like you did with a D3/s/x or D700. One will likely need to be prepared to lug around a tripod and kilowatts of lighting in order to benefit from and/or compensate for the sensor.

1 upvote
arigato_12
By arigato_12 (Feb 25, 2012)

All great stuff but don't forget to replace after it 3-4 years 'cos the sensor is used. Once upon a time camera companies made stuff that lasted for ages.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 25, 2012)

feel exactly the same as Dan Chung.
I'd like D800 but hate the low frame rate.
so waiting for 5D3 before the final decision.

0 upvotes
Daniel Roos
By Daniel Roos (Feb 25, 2012)

Nice article, please keep posting more of these articles.

0 upvotes
fuxicek
By fuxicek (Feb 25, 2012)

Ken Rockwell said: if you already have a Nikon D40 (or FE or SP), there's no need to buy a D800

;)

6 upvotes
Graham Lacdao
By Graham Lacdao (Feb 25, 2012)

lol...

1 upvote
ssebi_m
By ssebi_m (Feb 27, 2012)

Yeah, and he said if you want a great camera you can buy the D800, but if you want to take great pictures the Nikon D40 is great.

0 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Feb 24, 2012)

I don't like the imposed question if Nikon 'got it right or wrong' with these cameras.
These guys have never touched these cameras. But more important: It really doesn't matter what a pro with a specific need thinks when it comes to my own camera decisions.

I have my own needs/requirements when it comes to cameras. I happen to be a pro as well, but that's irrelevant. Everyone has their own needs / budget / goals. No 'right or wrong', there is only a match or not a match of a camera and what you need.

Not that I find their opinion uninteresting, but it has no influence or weight on what I need. A Reuters news reporter is certainly a pro, but he shoots stuff I don't shoot, he works differently and doesn't have to worry about what his gear costs for the most part.

The D800 will sell mostly to non or semi professionals. Their 'needs' are much more driven my what they want rather what they really have to deliver, so they will decide more based on their gut.

15 upvotes
dgc4rter
By dgc4rter (Feb 24, 2012)

+1 My thoughts too. Although it's interesting to see what other people think, it has no real influence on my decision to buy or not. I'm a serious amateur. The D800 appeals because of the kind of photography I do. I can imagine the D4 will appeal more to pros.

0 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 25, 2012)

The fact remains: with the D3 and D700 it was all very simple. You are a pro, you want/need it all and can afford it? You buy the D3. You are somehow less pro or a pro who wants backup body or on budget? You buy the D700 - a.k.a "90% D3". Everyone was quite happy, generally speaking.

Things got a bit complicated now. Not if you only wanted a high res body or need a really fast machine with money to spend. In that case you are one happy camper. But I mean, the D800 and D4 are two very different beast, unlike de D700 and D3. If the price was the same, the choice would be simple again. But it is not. For a lot of people de D4 is not an option and they don't like the D800 (maybe not yet).

So I can understand the opinion from the crowd falling in between the D4 and the D800. A vacuum.

Time (and proper reviews) will tell.

1 upvote
James Bligh
By James Bligh (Feb 25, 2012)

A very good point well spoken by Caleido, I might add that the highest ISO of D800 sample photos in the official Nikon site was 640 and all of D800E samples were shot at F8. So this may imply that with D800/D800E you'd better shoot at below ISO800 and avoid small apertures. And of course tripod mounted for optimum results.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 24, 2012)

NIKON: 2 CANON: 0

Until quite recently it used to be a Canikon World. Now, it's increasingly a NIKON World. Heck, Canon cannot even make believable product announcements any more.

I guess Canon figures, if you have a spare $16,000, get their EOS C300. If not, get the T3i.

0 upvotes
mysteriougamer
By mysteriougamer (Feb 25, 2012)

I can tell you are either a Nikon-only user or making a joke...or both, because there are several logical progressions between the T3i and the C300.

Way to over-simplify the Canon lineup.

2 upvotes
Devendra
By Devendra (Feb 24, 2012)

*yawn*

6 upvotes
Zvonko
By Zvonko (Feb 24, 2012)

can't beleive they haven't moved this crap article on

3 upvotes
dorsetman1980
By dorsetman1980 (Jun 1, 2012)

I cant believe they still have idiots like you coming back to make stupid comments!

0 upvotes
Thoughts
By Thoughts (Feb 24, 2012)

At the end of the day, the bread and butter business still is DX DSLR sector for Nikon, used by many many non-professionals. However, the game played by Canon and Nikon these days seems like :

hey, look at what those professionals use!
what ? you can't afford one?
err...okay, get a Dxxxx, it is rather good, but remember to get it upgrade every two years please.

oh, next Monday, a lady here will get super exited by the way... behold.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Feb 24, 2012)

D4 = ExpSim LV (maybe; most likely for stills and video); more MP than past 12Mp but only a bit; allows for fast fps still; but not fastest; video now 1080p, but DR poor, too contrasty, blowouts hard to control, not good for cinematography.
D3s = ExpSim LV (stills; video, but only 720p); resolved less than 5D2, a given; but had better hi-ISO IQ; good AF
D3x = ExpSim LV (stills); hi-MP (but IQ iffy; resolves less than 5D2 at higher ISOs); AF iffy.
D3 = ExpSim LV (stills); lo-MP (but IQ superb at higher ISOs; but resolves less; a given; offers higher fps (for lo-MP; this is a given)); AF good.

D800 = NO ExpSim LV (for neither stills or videos; like D700, but D700 only lacked video); but now has very hi-Mp; IQ will only be good at lower ISOs; lesson learned from D3x, and best left for studio. video only as good as D4 or less; also too contrasty and hard to control DR unremarkable for cinematography. AF be similar to what D3x faced for hi-MP. Much cheaper than non-ExpSim LV 645D or any MF

3 upvotes
Charly Diaz Azcue
By Charly Diaz Azcue (Feb 24, 2012)

I´m not going to say anything (like you) from a camera/s that is not even released on the market.
What I can say is that you have a ExpSh** LV fixation problem. :)
Best Regards

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
12 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 24, 2012)

From DXO Sensor ratings:
-------------------------------
*Nikon D3s Sports (Low-light ISO) 3252 ISO
*Nikon D700 Sports( Low-light ISO) 2303 ISO
*Canon 5D Mk II Sports (Low-light ISO) 1815 ISO
*Nikon D3X Sports (Low-light ISO) 1992 ISO with over 2 EV better DR

Good plan to write above as if they were facts, but the problem is all these cameras have been tested. The Canon 5D 2 has worse high ISO, and DR than ALL the Nikon DSLRs in your post. In the case of the D3s it's not even close.

You're just trolling, shilling for Canon. Little that you wrote is based in reality. DXO Mark has very few Canon DSLRs at the top of the list and it's been that way for least 5 years. Nice try though.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
17 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 24, 2012)

Why do you call the AF of the D3 good, but the AF of the D3x "iffy" ?

It's exactly the same AF.

11 upvotes
chris_j_l
By chris_j_l (Feb 24, 2012)

ExpSim LV. Something, something, something ExpSim LV; something, something Exp Sim Live View. Something something.

There - I've summarized all your posts to date.

5 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Feb 24, 2012)

Hmm, it seems you don't know much about what you are talking about (like poor DR from Nikons).

4 upvotes
Marco 2k7
By Marco 2k7 (Feb 24, 2012)

like blazing DR form D7000/D5100 sensor

1 upvote
putomax
By putomax (Feb 24, 2012)

Last year when I escaped the Advanced Language Research Facility for Apes (ALRFA) in Barcelona's Zoo, I had a difficult time, seems now all beginnings are.
I lost contact with all my chimp and orangu friends… It shames me to say that I even
considered to join a circus (despite I hate clowns). To cut a long story short, I discovered my passion, PHOTOGRAPHY. From that moment on my life's improved quite a bit… I'm taking a course on "Dialectics and Deep Fried Psychology of the Common Sense Restrains Applied to Internet Forums´ Syntax" which is helping me understand the gap and also the resemblance with our fellow cousins-humnas. Just look at me now, almost intelligible.
hey! BTW, a banana anyone?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 24, 2012)

Mental, mental.

0 upvotes
mysteriougamer
By mysteriougamer (Feb 25, 2012)

re: marik,

If you're going to point out how each of those cameras do on the benchmark, you might want to also include the fact that you're comparing the 5D Mk 2 to cameras that are all higher-priced. For $2500, it's hard to beat the Mk 2 in an all-around comparison of features to price.

Edit: and, that benchmark doesn't even have all of the semi-pro and pro Canon cameras (such as the 7D). That benchmark has drawbacks.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Shaun Bell
By Shaun Bell (Feb 25, 2012)

Really? Iffy IQ and AF for the D3x and out resolved by a 5DII? I can tell by your pictures you must be an expert.

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
sunhorse
By sunhorse (Feb 25, 2012)

@sdyue

You are basing your *conjectures* on some early samples.
Of course, you could always prove to us that you have been using the D4 & D800 for some time? Ball's in your court.

0 upvotes
semka
By semka (Feb 25, 2012)

You lady are on crack. D800 has ExpSim LV.

0 upvotes
Rolo King
By Rolo King (Feb 25, 2012)

You're really becoming hard to ignore with your ExpSim LV. I don't know what kind of photography you're doing (there must not be a lot of it since you're always here) but LV is useless for some types of shooting on many DSLR's including your belove EOS cameras thanks to the low AF speeds. So, ExpSim LV is easy to ignore for many. Also, even at my non-professional level, it is very easy to ballpark exposure and the intended output without feedback from the LCD screen. So, I sure hope that those who will be using these expensive cameras can do at least that.

1 upvote
Rick Knepper
By Rick Knepper (Feb 24, 2012)

Not sure what the value is of the opinions of persons who haven't used the systems in question. I am not even sure I care what a professional does with the equipment. He/she is trying to sell images/videos and will try to sell them regardless of IQ. Once they are sold, he can wash his hands and go on to the next project. I'm trying to produce images I want to look at for years.

4 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Feb 24, 2012)

soo.. these guys never really handled the D4 and D800?

I though this site is for reviews and news
And why only for Nikon? You don't care what the pro think about the Fuji X PRO 1?

2 upvotes
digilux
By digilux (Feb 24, 2012)

Give me a X pro 1 and I'll let you know.......for now I consider it to be a really expensive toy.

1 upvote
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Feb 24, 2012)

Reading this rapidly expanding thread, including some very purile comments, it seems obvious that the BIG question is:

How does the D800 with a nice big lump of prime glass compare to (say) a Leica S2, Pentax 645D or Hasselblad H4D, with equivalent (effective focal length) glass?

We all know the D800 will be WAY less costly - but how do its images compare to the big boys of medium format? And its handling? Yes, we need some landscape and studio photographers to come on board here ...

Brian

3 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Feb 24, 2012)

Agree, I want to see D800/E x 40MP MF bodies, it'll be interesting. These guys, ok, but they haven't touched the cameras, their comments are similar to what the pros in the forums are saying, not much added.

0 upvotes
nakeddork
By nakeddork (Feb 25, 2012)

A D800 will compare to a Medium format camera like a 16mp point-n-shoot will compare to a D4.

The comparison is only in megapixels.

Medium format backs shoot 16-bit files with a 48-bit color depth, which gives way more editing versatility.

Also, the medium format back renders an image on a sensor twice the size of a 35mm dlsr. That alone will produce a clearer image, and keep in mind that megapixels only retain more dpi for larger prints. A 12mp medium format camera will produce a clearer 8x10 than a D800, and until it hits its megapixel thresh hold.

Moreover, you get a faster flash sync with a mf camera because employs leaf shutter lenses, and they produce a different quality bokeh because of the wider angle view you get compared to a 35mm focal length.

The D800 is a high resolution 35mm body, not a medium format alternative. If you want medium format bite the bullet and jump up to medium format. You can get a pretty good mf film kit for the cost of a D800.

7 upvotes
digilux
By digilux (Feb 24, 2012)

"What do the professionals think"..well I'm a pro but nobody asked me...........

I think eh no I wish: a digital F2!
I don't need 36 megapix (I own a Hasselblad)
I don't need video (I'm a photographer)
I don't need 51 pt autofocus (I use Zeiss lenses)
I don't need 10 fps, 125,000 iso GPS turbocharger, intercooler a manual of 75 pages etc I want to tahe pictures of high quality with a camera that works everywhere, anywhere under any circumstances.

Oh and I want a digital Mamiya 7II (Please!)

2 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

Confused... If you don't need any of this, why are you even here?

0 upvotes
Azra
By Azra (Feb 26, 2012)

haha- Agreed.

I'm a full-time photographer and I have been crying out for extra pixels, as a current d700 user. Now I'll be able to have 3/4 length protraits cropped as headshots and still fill a double page spread with ease.

THIS is what more pixels mean to me and those who comission me.

[and before anyone moans, it isnt always practical to move in really close for a head shot on a shoot, regardless of what the armchair critics say]

0 upvotes
Raymond Shiu
By Raymond Shiu (7 months ago)

Surely digilux make his bread and butter!!!!
What a wonderful experienced guy!!

I like your following two sentences in particular!
I think eh no I wish: a digital F2!
I don't need 51 pt autofocus (I use Zeiss lenses)

Electronics don't work well below 0 degree celcius.

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Feb 24, 2012)

If the rumoured 5dDMkIII spec is true let get some perspective when comparing to D800 with core feature.
D800 wins in MP 36mp vs 22mp
D800 wins in uncompress HDMI video and possibly audio with headphone input
D800 wins in price $3000 vs $3500

5DMkIII wins in ISO (native 100-25600 vs 100-6400)
5DMkIII wins speed 6.9fps vs 4fps
5DMkIII wins in AF points 61 with 41 cross pts vs 51 with 15 cross pts
5DMkIII wins in video bitrate 48mbs vs 24 mbs and moire handling

Of course I like big MP but to me the 5DMkIII looks more compelling.

4 upvotes
digifan
By digifan (Feb 24, 2012)

I want to win as a photographer that's why I don't care about the behemoth's and will by E-M5. ;-)

What a stupid remark about what camera wins.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
1 upvote
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Feb 24, 2012)

It's Ford vs. Chevy

Chevy has more hp, Ford has ...

When the dust settles, I also like the EM5

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 24, 2012)

* The 5D Mk III will not have 41 cross sensors. It will have a simplified version of the 1DX, which has 21 cross sensors. The D800 will have a better AF module as Nikon's predictive AF tracking is significantly more effective than what Canon offers.
* Video bitrate the D800 you will be able to shoot over 300 mbs with the D800 via HDMI out a feature that you need to get a 20,000 Canon C300 to obtain. This is a huge deal for videographers, and a huge win for Nikon
* D800 is expandable to 25,600 and and images there are more than useable. The D700 has better high ISO performance than the 5D MK II. D800 is at least as good as the D700 so it's not a given that the 5D Mk III will be better

Studio photographers will likely flock to Nikon as when Canon announced a 18 mp 1DX, the 5D Mk III became their last hope for super high resolution imaging. Now that we know the 5D Mk III will have virtually the same 22mp resolution as the 5D Mk II, many will not be compelled to stay with Canon.

2 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Feb 24, 2012)

*5DMkIII is expected to have 61 pts AF like the 1DX. Only one rumour which came out today says it may be dumb down version of the 1DX so until we hear a lot more it is still expected to beat the D800 51pts AF.
* Video bitrates is actual bitrate details captured not video size. Do not confuse bitrate with size of video. Have you tried freeze frame a D800 video and compare it to a GH2?
*Expandable ISO is not true native ISO from the sensor. D700 is almost 4 years old. 5DMkIII is at least 2 stop better than either of those.
*5DMkIII 22mp is aimed at improving video resampling 3x3 to eliminate moire and line skipping, a massive improvement over any dSLRs including D800, GH2 and 1DX. Yes 5DMkIII will have better video than 1DX which has better video than D800.
*Canon will annnounce a 39MP for the 4k Cinema dSLR which allows for 4x4 resampling for 4k.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Feb 24, 2012)

You seem to know everything about the next 5D. The high ISO improvement in the new Canons may be just what the Canon people said about 1DX: in jpegs only. The D800 is showing at least 1/2 better high ISO than the D700, and the Dr will be vastly improved, likely over 14EV at base ISO. You didn't mention that ;). I agree that for video the 5Dnext shluld be better, let's wait and see. But in every stills IQ aspect I bet on the D800. And the AF? Well, the Nikon's system has been well tested, it's rated to -2EV, let's see if the new Canon system actually owrks. And if the 5Dnext uses the full AF from 1DX. And res, forget it, if one needs it, there's only Nikon at this point.

5 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 24, 2012)

@Taikonaut I know exactly what bitrate is, nobody is confusing anything. I said megabits. The fact is the D800 using clean HDMI out will be able to shoot uncompressed video at bitrates over 300 megabits. This is huge. This means all the compression artifacts like aliasing/moire that the 5D MK II is known for will not exist. This is a huge win for Nikon and it will not available in the 5D Mk III or 1DX. And at $3500 USD, a 5D Mk III just won't be as compelling a camera to many videographers.

There is no doubt that Canon has focused a lot of R&D on video. But perhaps Canon's shift of focus to an HDSLR video company is because they have fallen so far behind Nikon regarding photography. DXOMark supports this.
Nikon has just gotten serious about video and because, unlike Canon, they don't have to protect cameras like the C300 higher in the line from being cannibalized, they can offer features like clean HDMI out, and headphone jack in their DSLRs. Canon will not do this.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 24, 2012)

Biggest difference between the Nikon D800 and the Canon 5D Mark III is: One exists. The other one doesn't. Probably never will.

0 upvotes
Almeida
By Almeida (Feb 24, 2012)

Clean HDMI out doesn't make much of a difference, especially when considering the extra expense involved.

Source: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/accessories/hyperdeck_shuttle_review.shtml

1 upvote
max metz
By max metz (Feb 24, 2012)

I guess the Nikon and Canon professional cameras are steaming along in a particular traditional direction, can't blame them for that or for existing users seeing the benefits in that approach.

I want more, I want full frame or medium format with low light capability and to effortlessly see what the sensor does in real time in the viewfinder, I want to clearly know and see what is in focus graphically, I want simple yet effective fast manual photographic control and i want good dynamic range as high up the iso scale as i can get.

I don't care about video at all.

The Leica M9 ticks some of these boxes, the Nikon and Canon tick others, the Fuji x-pro looks to be a winner for me as it seems to tick them all. Time will tell

1 upvote
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Feb 24, 2012)

According to Nikon Rumour poll survey most Nikon owners prefer the D800 to have smaller 16mp like the D4 that doesnt compromise ISO and fps rather than 36mp with lower ISO and slower fps.

2 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 24, 2012)

D700 is still today a good choice, I think.
I have one and the only lack is: frequent accidental displacement of the focus mode selector.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 24, 2012)

Based on images around the web, D800 has comparable high ISO performance with less chroma noise than D700. The assumption that it do not is just speculation. For Nikon to max out their pro DSLR line at 16 mp when others like Sony already have the 24 mp A77 that is superb, and will soon release a 36 mp FF DSLR, would be foolish indeed. I am so glad that the amateurs voting in these polls do not run Nikon.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Feb 24, 2012)

BS: the other half didn't have a high MP option at a lower price, with video. The crowd with fps needs and extreme low-light ability (which the D700 is not doing anymore) have the D4 and, likely, a D800 version with D4's sensor eventually. Nikon know what they are doing.

1 upvote
Dan Tong
By Dan Tong (Feb 24, 2012)

Interesting article. It was good to hear from more than one pro, and I enjoyed Dan Chung's wonderful video of Beijing.

Thanks,

Dan

1 upvote
funnelwebmaster
By funnelwebmaster (Feb 24, 2012)

zZZzzz....

0 upvotes
Photex
By Photex (Feb 24, 2012)

I think dpreview is loosing it's way by putting these peoples uninformed ideas in their website under a title (Nikon D4 & D800: What do the Professionals Think?) which is a reliable source of information for us to visit and I prefer it to stay that way.

As an example this is what Neil Lupin says about Nikon D4's high ISO performance:
(ISO 6400 is useable on the D3 but requires careful exposure to avoid too much noise, but if it's true that ISO 6400 on the D4 will be as good as ISO 1600 was on the D3/D3S, then I'll be at the front of the queue when they start shipping)
Where did he get these info from?

And this is what Mr. Toshiaki Akagi, Nikon engineer said in his interview at CES 2012

Q. How would you compare the high ISO image quality of the D4 to the D3S?

A. Overall, Nikon D4 high ISO noise levels are very similar to the D3S, though photos shot with the D4 will have reduced colour noise thanks mainly to noise reduction improvements in the Nikon D4 EXPEED 3 processing hardware.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
aleckurgan
By aleckurgan (Feb 24, 2012)

He-he, that's wishful thinking of a "professional" :)

0 upvotes
jacketpotato
By jacketpotato (Feb 24, 2012)

The point of such cameras is to think as little as possible. Just point & shoot & deliver. Most advance p&s in the market.

Thus the title of this article "What do the Professionals Think?" is quite amusing.

3 upvotes
intruder61
By intruder61 (Feb 24, 2012)

professionals?

2 upvotes
Retro Joe
By Retro Joe (Feb 23, 2012)

I would like to hear from some ham and eggers that have a lot of excess cash to see how these DSLRs are working out for them.

3 upvotes
Don Paluh
By Don Paluh (Feb 23, 2012)

Video and Live-View questions. I had the Nikon D3s. And to shoot video at the highest quality, you could only shoot for a few minutes continually (I can't remember the exact number), and then the video time increased with appropriate decreases in video resolution.

Also the Live View mode was a real hassle to get into: you had to pick Tripod mode or something and click around quite a bit. I mostly use the viewfinder, but I'd like option to compose from the screen as you can on almost every other camera.

Does anybody know how these are handled on the D4 or D800?

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Feb 23, 2012)

i just want the m8 prices to drop so i can trade my d700 and lenses for one and iam out of that "more-megapixel-all-in-one-devices" race till some company comes out with a digital back for my F3 :)

5 upvotes
TGThomas
By TGThomas (Feb 23, 2012)

I read many comments already here and I concur: I would like to hear from professional studio and landscape photographers, too.

Thanks for the nice article anyway.

2 upvotes
Total comments: 391
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