Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras

Conclusion

It's impossible to look at a group of cameras this diverse and select a single winner, since the needs and expectations of different users are too varied. Hopefully though, the information in the preceding pages of this review will help guide you towards those models that are best suited for your needs. In this page, we've split the nine cameras in this roundup into three main groups, representing (roughly) three of the main priorities that you might have when choosing a camera in this class. Those are, in order, pocketability, zoom versatility, and 'best all-rounder', for those cameras which offer the most compelling overall feature set. We've then selected what we think are the two best cameras for each of these use cases. 

In making these selections, we're judging the cameras by their own merits. But as always, what matters to us might not matter to you, and you might have specific priorities of your own. So for example, if you shoot with a Nikon DSLR and you've got a Speedlight flashgun, the Coolpix P7700 might make an ideal second camera because it's compatible with gear that you already own. Likewise the Canon PowerShot G15 if you're a Canon DSLR user, or the Olympus XZ-2 if you shoot with a PEN-series interchangeable lens camera, and you want to use the same EVF or flash unit.

OK, enough caveats - here's our selection. Thanks for reading, and feel free to leave suggestions and feedback in the comments.  

So you want something to fit in your pocket?

If you're looking for better image quality than a regular compact camera but you still need to fit it in your pocket, there are arguably only three real choices here: the Fujifilm XF1, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 or Canon's PowerShot S110. Each works well as a point-and-shoot while also making it simple and enjoyable to take control over. Of course, how pocketable a camera is depends on how big your pockets are - none of the models in this roundup will weigh you down. 

Of the three cameras we've selected as most pocketable, the RX100 offers by far the best image quality of the bunch, although it does come with a price premium.

Our recommendations

Canon PowerShot S110 and Sony RX100

It's hard to ignore the Fujifilm XF1's attractive styling and engaging shooting experience when making a selection in this category, but we've chosen the Canon PowerShot S110 and Sony Cyber-shot RX100 as the standout products if your priority is a good quality, pocket camera. The Canon PowerShot S110 earns its selection for its exceptionally compact form factor, hassle-free ergonomics, touch-sensitive LCD and Wi-Fi connectivity. But in image quality terms neither comes close to matching the Sony RX100. Never before has it been possible to buy a camera that fits so much capability into a package so small.

Or maybe you need a more versatile zoom?

Capability doesn't need to come at the expense of quality, but there are some tradeoffs. The cameras in this roundup which have the most wide-ranging zoom lenses, for example, have slower maximum apertures than those which feature shorter zooms. But for some photographers, the benefits of a sharp 28-200mm lens, such as you'll find on the Nikon Coolpix P7700, will outweigh the extra light-gathering ability of a shorter, faster zoom such as that boasted by the Panasonic LX7 or Olympus XZ-2. 

In terms of out-and-out zoom capability, two cameras really stand out in this group - the Canon PowerShot G15 and Nikon Coolpix P7700, which offer 28-140mm and 28-200mm zooms respectively. The G15's optical viewfinder is unusual in today's market, and its F1.8-2.8 lens may not be the fastest here but is still impressively bright. The P7700 has the edge when it comes to zoom reach, offering a telephoto setting of 200mm (equivalent), but compared to the G15 its operation is rather slow, and its lens is 2/3 stop slower, too. On the plus side though, the P7700's articulated LCD screen makes shooting video and composing images from awkward angles much easier. Both models offer extensive customization along with full manual exposure control from a generous number of external controls. 

Our recommendations

Canon PowerShot G15 and Nikon P7700

All of the cameras in this group are versatile but we've chosen the Canon PowerShot G15 and Nikon P7700 for their extra features, whether that be the Canon's optical viewfinder, the Nikon's extra reach or their ability to integrate into their respective manufacturer's systems. The Nikon P7700 offers the greatest reach of any of these zoom compacts, which might be a decisive factor for some users, but the G15's combination of reach and speed makes it very flexible camera. The loss of the flip-out screen might push some users away from the G15, but its brighter lens, faster focus, simpler interface, great build and dependable output make the G15 a formidable option, even with such capable rivals. 

What's the best all-rounder?

If you're looking for a balance of size, image quality (even in low light) and direct control, we'd recommend taking a long hard look at the Sony Cyber-shot RX100, the Olympus Stylus XZ-2 and the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7. The Sony RX100's 20MP sensor gives it an advantage when it comes to resolution and the size of the sensor keeps it competitive in low light. There are some compromises to be made in terms of size and lens range but these models offer a compelling degree of versatility, especially if this will be your only camera.

The Olympus XZ-2 can't quite reach the RX100's level when it comes to image quality (and remember, resolution is a big part of this - at 20MP the RX100 out-resolves every other camera in its class), but the XZ-2's bright, sharp lens and useful 28-112mm equivalent zoom range make it very competitive amongst its smaller-sensored peers. It is also one of the most expandable cameras here, with the option to add an electronic viewfinder and remotely trigger Olympus flashguns.

The 10MP Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 is the latest in a well-established line of premium Panasonic compacts, and there's very little to complain about in this latest iteration. Along with its ultra-fast lens the LX7 is improved in many little ways over the LX5, with a much better LCD display, dedicated aperture control ring and inbuilt one-press ND filter. It can also accept the high resolution DMW-LVF2 electronic viewfinder. The only real downsides are its rather restrictive zoom range of 24-90mm (equivalent), and the fact that its dedicated aperture ring is less flexible than the customizable control rings found on its rivals.

The Fujifilm X10 is also worth a look for two reasons - its excellent lens, and an EXR sensor which offers the option of incredibly good dynamic range and somewhat better high ISO image quality than its peers. The tradeoff is that you only get these benefits if you're happy to shoot at 6MP, and the way in which the EXR functionality is implemented can be confusing.

Our recommendations

Olympus Stylus XZ-2 and Sony RX100

Much as we like the Panasonic LX7, the longer lens, excellent JPEGs and engaging user interface make the XZ-2 stand out for us. The XZ-2 is one of the nicest cameras in this group to use, featuring extensive customization inherited from Olympus's PEN-series interchangeable lens cameras. This is a serious enthusiast camera and easily one of the best of its type that we've encountered. Really the Olympus's strongest competition comes from the Sony RX100 - which at least matches it for image quality but doesn't quite offer the sense of engagement that we appreciate in the XZ-2's operational ergonomics.

Comments

Total comments: 417
123
jonsmith
By jonsmith (1 month ago)

I note with much surprise that the fuji xf1 is still retailing for £170!
this super looking and very pocketable camera is just so horribly flawed I'm surprised it isn't in the bargain basement department yet. I bought one to replace a worn out ricoh grd 3 as my pocket camera and oh boy, it was like going from a porsche to a hoop and stick!

the xf1 is almost unusable for:
macro use, (stupidly fiddly button and refuses to focus on what you want)
any quick work/street shooting,
anything in low light (ghastly artifacts from just iso 400).

add to the above the really poor auto focus hunting and the hampering on/off switch and you have a package of nightmares wrapped in a pretty box.

the big problem for fuji though is that this kind of shoddy rubbish really has put me off their premium stuff. I had been considering the xe2, but the exhausting experience with the xf1 has had me scurrying to sony to upgrade my dslr and to the aps-c sensor ricoh gr for my pocket street camera.

.

0 upvotes
OlafN
By OlafN (2 months ago)

I am hesitating between XZ2 and P7700. I have D80 and SB800 so Nikon camera was tempting me more. Until I took a close look at the portrait photos of a guy with a beard. XZ2 is sooooo much sharper! Or I should rather say - why is a photo from P7700 so blurred? Is there something wrong with that sample photo? Can anyone comment/explain that?
Well, if this is a real performance of P7700, then I'd definitely go with XZ2...

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
primalspy
By primalspy (3 months ago)

Can anyone recommend a good compact enthusiast camera that has a fully articulating screen?
I like the Nikon P7700 & the Samsung EX2F.
I like to shoot video & photos.

0 upvotes
sdh
By sdh (7 months ago)

This review states the Oly XZ-2 has optical IS. Everywhere else I read it's sensor-based IS (same as in the XZ-1). I suspect this review is mistaken. Can dpreview confirm?

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (6 months ago)

We didn't mean to imply it was lens-based stabilization - the company uses the ambiguous term 'optical' stabilization, I believe.

I've updated the page to reflect this correction. Thanks.

0 upvotes
Artistico
By Artistico (8 months ago)

Shame the RX-100 doesn't have a 10 (or at most 12) megapixel sensor instead of the pointless 20. It would have been so much better in terms of colour, dynamic range, noise, half file sizes, and basically the same practical resolution as it is more lens-limited than sensor-limited.

5 upvotes
GDMitchell
By GDMitchell (6 months ago)

Isn't this typical of Sony: Spinal Tap mentality at it's worst: if the amps go to 11 (or 20 in this case) they must be better

0 upvotes
Duncan Dimanche
By Duncan Dimanche (6 months ago)

exactly my thought... but those nikon 1 don't seem to be much better with 10mpx sensors....

0 upvotes
edhume
By edhume (8 months ago)

I would like to see, in these roundup articles, a shot with all the comparison cameras seen from above with their lenses retracted, so we can get a sense of how thick they would be.

Also, a standard comment on lens caps would be nice. I like my LX7, but it has a removable lens cap, and adding an auto lens cap adds thickness to the camera and prevents fitted cases from fitting over the camera.

Finally, I wish you had a drop-down menu for the pages of this review so readers could navigate through it more quickly.

8 upvotes
108
By 108 (9 months ago)

Looking for an upgrade for my Canon S95. Oly XZ2 's samples are impressive, the camera looks awesome. Something I can have on my belt, like the S95, even if bigger.

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (10 months ago)

Canon need to make better S110 replacement. the competition become harder now.
Need faster lens, Better battery life. use Digic 6.
Improve the Portrait mode especially above 50mm.
Utilize more the touch screen so we can play more with the images, to create many other creative photos

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

I agree with the fact the S series could use some improvements, battery life in particular is kinda weak... But even with all these other compacts around it still doesn't really have a lot of DIRECT competition. Think about it, at the end of the day most of the people that end up getting the S100/110 do so because it's easily slipped in a pant's pocket.

Only other camera in this round-up that fits that description is the RX100 and it's twice as expensive. Heck, the only other cameras announced or released since the article was published that fit the same description are the Nikon P330 and the Panasonic DMC-LF1. We don't even know if the RX100 will be updated this year.

The former is very very similar with few innovations and some of the same downsides (plus possibly a few more) and the latter is a slight improvement in some senses (longer zoom reach, better wifi implementation, better battery life) but it's also $100 more expensive, which puts it squarely between the S110 and the RX100.

So in reality, the Canon S series has very little to worry about... Unless the RX100's or LF1's prices drop $100+. I'd be surprised if Canon changes it much this year, given their history. I was in the market for something like it and ended up pre-ordering the LF1 btw. The S110 is probably still the better value tho.

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (10 months ago)

Canon market eaten by Sony RX 100 and Panasonic LF 1. they must take serious action. otherwise more user switch to other brand. and older s serie user s 95 and s 110, s110 will not upgrade. canon must give Good reason to upgrade. beside only Digic 6, and some minor improvement

0 upvotes
mohamadyounes
By mohamadyounes (10 months ago)

Had the Nikon 7700, ok it looks great in term of design, good build quality and fantastic screen ergonomic, good movies and wide variety of filters, but though, who guys needs all these filters? I don't. The only problem I had with it is the brightness of the pictures. Man, it is always dark and need some work with PS. Nikon, please stay with the DSLR, I got the D90 and now the D600 and you deserve a kiss for that. I sold it to buy the Olympus xz-2 and want to say: this is the most powerful enthusiast camera I ever seen. It is simply excellent, great pictures in low light, always sharp, keep the iso setting to automatic with shutter minimum 1/30s and shoot, and you won't regret it. Solid quality, super screen and fantastic menu. No chicky micky filters, it is only a real camera with superior lens and sensor. I would recommend it anyone wants to make excellent pictures.

2 upvotes
ALToR Photos
By ALToR Photos (11 months ago)

Pentax was omitted, why?

2 upvotes
ianp5a
By ianp5a (10 months ago)

Because the MX-1 was not available last year when this test was published.

They should also now include the Panasonic LF1. (despite it hasn't got an X in the name)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Aroart
By Aroart (11 months ago)

I personally tested and bought and returned most of these cameras. Get the Fuji x20 for cool factor and awesome image quality the video is horrible. The Sony rx100 is great but its a bit small and doesn't feel to comfortable to hold, you can get a sony nex 3n for $200 cheaper is way better and is not that much bigger. Olympus has probably the best feel and images are great and video is decent. Stay away from canon and Nikon unless your your buying their full frame stuff. I kept the Panasonic lx7 . It's was the most bang for your buck. Oh and it's video mode blows away all , yes even the Sony. It also does 120 Fps slow mo,at a decent resolution .

0 upvotes
PuzzleGal
By PuzzleGal (10 months ago)

Sounds like I should look at the Sony RX100. I'm definitely looking for "small". I'm a little put off by the description of the user interface, though. I've loved the interface of the Canon S90.

0 upvotes
SunnyS
By SunnyS (10 months ago)

Puzzlegal' The Sony's interface is not to be feared of, you can get used to it after a while. It has to be exercised, played with. It's made for people, after all. The problem is what do you expect from this camera. What do you own now?
The cameras deemed "enthusiast" really reward you if you know what to expect. I would advise : try before you buy, if possible.

1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

The one thing that's really irritating about the RX100 is that delay after you flick the zoom toggle while previewing a picture... It annoyed me to no end while trying it out, my old Sony compact has a similar lag but it almost seems more pronounced on the RX100, despite the price.

0 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (11 months ago)

I don't have any of these cameras. If I had to buy one, it would be LX7. It has aperture ring and a dial on the lens switching for AF to MF. I use NEX 5N, I need dig into manual to change AF to MF. It's really a pain. Even more advance NEX6 doesn't have the dial to switch between the focus modes. Why do I need MF? I like it in video mode, personally I think it's much more reliable than AF.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
davids8560
By davids8560 (11 months ago)

I ended up going with the RX100. My life changed a lot soon after buying it. Women paid more attention to me. The local paper did a full-page feature about me in the Sunday edition. The mayor started inviting me down to city hall for lunch every couple of weeks. People I'd had differences with in the past came to me and asked for forgiveness. It's been really great!

34 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (11 months ago)

Is this a joke or for real?

1 upvote
chp
By chp (11 months ago)

It must be a joke: the local newspaper is edited on weekdays ONLY...

6 upvotes
Cagey75
By Cagey75 (10 months ago)

Ah come on Jun2 ... lol

3 upvotes
offtheback
By offtheback (10 months ago)

Davids-I bought one also and am now able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.Did you not get that power as well?

1 upvote
tomservo33
By tomservo33 (10 months ago)

Are you sure you bought a camera, or a Kilo of Bolivian marching dust?

3 upvotes
jhonmont
By jhonmont (11 months ago)

Hello,

I'm wanting to upgrade my compact from a Nikon P310,

I had the chance to test out the Canon G15, what i really liked was the capacity of a sort of "Live Settings Preview" in the screen, i mean, depending on your F and shutter it would show you how "more or less" the light would look like on your pictures.
This feature is not possible in my Nikon P310, which you have to take several photos testing settings until you get you want, since i'm just an amateur/hobbie/occasional photo guy, i'm wondering:
which compacts besides the Canon G15 have this "Live settings preview"?
To be honest i'm do not like the Canon G15 for its size, so looking alternatives?

Many thanks guys

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Will O'Neil
By Will O'Neil (11 months ago)

So I guess DPReview's recommendation is that those of us who need real wide angle and a hot shoe should just forget it and settle for an XZ-2 or RX100 because they're "better". The whole idea of a "comparison test" of things that really aren't comparable is just daft.

I have an LX3 that I use all the time and am thinking about going to an LX7. There are some really nice cameras in this group, but there is no other camera of any kind that will do what I need done.

2 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (11 months ago)

You're suggesting that no-one goes into a shop and decides between two slightly dissimilar products?

Clearly we aren't recommending any camera over and above specific requirements you may have - our recommendations can't help but be for what we believe to be a 'typical' use-case.

8 upvotes
tommyngo
By tommyngo (11 months ago)

My wife likes taking pictures with her Panasonic Lumix DMC-FH25 from the touring bus as it is winding its way through the countryside. But she misses her shots most of the time due to the slow response of the shutter button !! My question is : Can the Sony RX100 assure 100% success rate for her ?

Her birthday is coming up in a few weeks , I would love to get this camera for her if it really does the job . Thanks ...

0 upvotes
GDMitchell
By GDMitchell (5 months ago)

Have you thought of explaining the limitations of her technique? You could ask the driver to stop too. A better camera may not equal better shots. The RX100 is very slow at any lever of zoom, big sensor or not. The lens grabs the light so invest your pennies there. Panny LX series trades zoom for aperture and gives great results even at zoom on a smaller sensor. It would still. Struggle at 30mph out of a bus window though.

0 upvotes
davids8560
By davids8560 (Apr 30, 2013)

I reach for the Sony RX100 more often than any other I own. And I own many cameras, including enthusiast compact models like the XZ1 and LX3. The RX100 offers far more bang for the buck, in terms of image quality, than any other small camera I've tried. The RX100 is not the most fun or intiitive camera.. But the images it produces, for its size, in almost any light, are superlative. The LCD has let me down in bright light. it can be hard if not impossible to see. The RX100 needs a small EVF like the one the tiny Nikon P60 has, or an optional hot shoe-mounted viewfinder like the XZ1. I also use a third-party adhesive filter adapter, and t for even more creative possibilities, and it would be great if Sony provided a lens adapter tube attachment. I hope the follow up to the RX100 has at least an optional viewfinder, a wider, faster lens, and a control wheel with detents.

4 upvotes
GDMitchell
By GDMitchell (5 months ago)

I found a tattoo much cheaper and improved my sex life no end :)

0 upvotes
Nikon doc
By Nikon doc (Apr 25, 2013)

As someone who actually owns a P7700 I can say the only place this camera disappoints me is the write speed, it could have used a buffer that it seems not to have. The photos that I get are quite good, sometimes it’s hard to tell its photos apart from my D300’s without a closer look. The lens on the P7700 is just excellent! I also get great flash results from putting my SB-700 on the P7700 using the Speedlight as bounce and the flash on the P7700 as front fill. If I could change anything (in addition to write speed) on this camera I would give it environmental sealing. I do recommend this camera if you can live with the write speed issue, I love mine and it’s just fun to use. If you want something simple though it might not be a first choice due to its enthusiast versatility making it more complicated.

1 upvote
Cloner
By Cloner (Apr 29, 2013)

Hi Nikon doc! When I check P7700 reviews almost everyone talks about the slow write speed. I didn't have the chance to test it myself yet but would be grateful if you can tell me if your concerns are related to RAW or standard JPEG write speeds? I am seriously inclined towards P7700 as my 2nd camera (as companion to D90) for travel needs. Also I couldn't see any night shots with P7700. As it has a longer zoom than others, it is a bit slower at the telephoto end. How does it fare in low light? You would be doing me a great favor if you could let me know. Thanks...

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (11 months ago)

@Cloner: I had the p7000, and I can attest that Nikon has the BEST night scene mode of any of these cameras. forget the marketing hype, they come out just amazing. I've taken pictures, hand-held, of things as it was getting dark, almost night, and they come out good. I gave that one to my daughter, and bought the XZ1. I was expecting better performance, because of it's much faster lens. And I was so disappointed. Their night scene mode is a farce. FYI, the night scenes on these cameras can pair pixels together to produce higher sensitivity without increasing noise. But on some brands it works, on some brands, it's nothing more than marketing hype.

0 upvotes
nevada5
By nevada5 (Apr 24, 2013)

The specs say stabilization is via sensor-shift. In the review it says "optically stabilized zoom lens." Anyone know which is correct?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (11 months ago)

For which camera?

0 upvotes
DJD29
By DJD29 (Apr 23, 2013)

I've settle with carrying around my 60D even when its bulk is inappropriate to the occasion. I gave my S90 to my wife which she soon wore down. I then gave her my LX5, a sad farewell. I enjoyed the LX5's fast metering, focusing presets, fast focus, and generally great image quality. I sold my G10 - not happy with its range, though the image quality was okay.

Now, that the game has changed, I'm back in the market for one of these "enthusiast" cameras.

I'm hung up on sensor size. I'm leaning towards the RX100. Am I for all the wrong reasons?

Could someone tell me what the sensor size accomplishes in terms of resolution, etc?

My pick would be the LX7 only because I loved the responsiveness of the LX5. What does "largest image area" accomplish in terms of resolution, etc?

1 upvote
Yinle
By Yinle (Apr 26, 2013)

Better low light quality and Swallower DOF.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (11 months ago)

A better thing to get hung up on (though it's still only an approximate proxy for image quality) is the combined effect of sensor size and maximum aperture.

See the graph at the bottom of Page 2 and you'll find that the RX100's larger sensor doesn't give shallower depth of field (or, in theory, better low light quality), at the long end of its zoom, thanks to the slower lens.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (11 months ago)

It's important to point out that the RX100 does give shallower DoF up until the 60mm focal length. At that point, the best ones all intersect. And that is where some start to do better. How much better? You'll see it on the longer end, but won't notice it until you go beyond 70, and that is getting close to the farthest end of some of their zoom ranges. At the long end, not all cameras produce as good results, some poor, some ok. At the long end, you start to worry about sharpness and other things, nevermind DoF.
70mm is satisfactory (starting length) for good portrait photography.
And between 35mm and 50mm, it definitely offers more DoF than the others, which will be apparent in street shooting for example.
I think all too often this is overlooked, and should be emphasized more, exactly when it starts to have less DoF.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
GDMitchell
By GDMitchell (5 months ago)

I reckon I could throw a G10 a distance of around 30-50 feet if the conditions were good enough. I think that's a good range for a point and snap.

1 upvote
Cloner
By Cloner (Apr 18, 2013)

Hi everyone. I own a D90 and honestly can't take it to holidays with me because of size and weight issues (my 18-300 is on it most of the time when I am not running after bugs with my 60 mm micro). As can be seen, macro capability is important for me. I have made a shortlist with Fuji X20, Olympus XZ2, Panasonic LX7 and Nikon P7700. Much as Sony RX100 looks to be a good choice in terms of technology, I can't bring myself to like it. It looks too much like a point-and-shoot and the slowness at the zoom end kind of kills it for me. Can anyone with similar needs and prejudices (!) help me? I would really appreciate it.
Thanks...

2 upvotes
Robbie62
By Robbie62 (Apr 25, 2013)

Cloner,

I to own a D90 but I'm having trouble coming to grips with carting it all over Canada in August. I've also been looking at pocketable cameras in the above test and am coming to the conclusion that none are perfect. The Sony RX100 worries me a little, the small size, while good in some respects may well get dropped easily. After some soul searching I'm coming around to the XZ-2, it seems to be a little more solid and the tilt rear screen may be handy on a small tripod. I also note that some camera shops are not stocking Sony cameras the reason I was told is the lack of after sales support?
Regards Robbie62

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (11 months ago)

they all seem to have the same minimal macro focus distance of 1cm (0.4"), except for the RX100 a5 5cm (2")! for macro photography, you may have to cross that one off your list, unless you change your style: because you have 20mp to play with, you can take your shot at 5cm, and crop out, and be left with a reasonable magnification close to that of the others. But since the numbers are squared, you may still end up with less of a magnification even after cropping - I'm guesstimating mere, as I' haven't compared then hands-on. Go to a trore, with a little plastic bug or something, and try them out before you buy. If it's comparable, you may have to turn to some other features (or lack thereof) to break any ties.

1 upvote
Cloner
By Cloner (11 months ago)

Timmbits: Thank you very much for the help.
I am torn between Fuji X20 and Nikon P7700. And now there is Sony HX50V and Panasonic LF1 to consider... I am slightly going mad!

0 upvotes
KMcLean
By KMcLean (Apr 10, 2013)

Just purchased the Canon S110 and am impressed by the quality and controls. It has a bright lens and the image quality is very good. Wide angle is good and ISO capability is there beyond the competition for the price range. I like that it fits in my pocket. It also shoots in RAW. The only criticism so far is that I had a heck of a time threading the wrist strap. I found from dpreview posters that using dental floss can help threading it through the impossible. Recommend this camera.

1 upvote
Antzutd
By Antzutd (Apr 9, 2013)

why there is no pentax mx-1?

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (11 months ago)

Because this article was written around a month before the Pentax was announced.

2 upvotes
PhotoPoet
By PhotoPoet (Apr 9, 2013)

OK here I go again... returned the Fuji X20, shoot with a D7000 and Cannon S100, gave the 95 to daughter. So is the RX100 the answer. All cameras have, as we know, pros and cons. I want carry anywhere, a camera that will take me away from my (don't freakout now) iPhone, because I love to edit and share with family the moment I shoot (yes was a professional photographer for decades and now enjoy instagram and email my life "as it happens"). I believe we are all a bit nuts with the number of cameras we have/buy/sell/test/, but its what we do. I am guessing if the iPhone had an optical zoom I'd do fine. I also digress. I love to shoot, (as we all do), so aside from phone/photo haters who may not wish to answer :), can "you" say that the RX100 will deliver the images I want when I dont want to drag my D7000 around? Thanks for listening..

0 upvotes
Salvador Abreu
By Salvador Abreu (Apr 14, 2013)

Similar experience; I misplaced my Oly XZ-1 and am looking for a replacement. I also ended up returning a Fuji X20, and have been shooting with a S110 for over a week.

The X20 is a nice object, but hardly suitable for full-time availability (as in 'in your pocket"), and it's RAW is not supported in Aperture, which was a killer for me.

It turns out the S110 is much nicer than I expected, being so responsive. The touchscreen is well integrated and provides a very useful and quick interface to common functions, for instance focus aiming and exposure compensation. It's very clean up to ISO 1600 and useable a little further up, too bad you *must* resort to that when zooming in...

Now all that's left is for me to check out the RX100... The larger sensor is appealing...

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 6, 2013)

I've been most impressed with the controls on my Fuji XS1, and there is consistency across the board with Fuji. With their innovative Xtrans sensor, and it being larger than all but the RX100, the X20 would be an easy choice for me.
Too bad the X20 doesn't have a larger sensor (or too bad that the rx100 doesn't have Fuji's wonderful controls), but at least the X20's sensor is larger than the rest of the pack. And zoom range is quite satisfactory too. Now just to wait for prices to drop... if I can wait that long.

(and just in case someone brings it up, the X100S is both too expensive, and I'd rather have a f1.4 50mm equivalent lens on it - I'm not a buyer with a 35mm equivalent - not when I can get, for a smaller and price, a Samsung NX300 with 30mm (45mm equivalent) - but that's a different category anyways).

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
baconsandwich
By baconsandwich (Apr 4, 2013)

I'm an LX-3 user and while I have been really satisfied with it overall I would like a little more reach, and a little more than the LX-7 offers. I'm a Canon DSLR shooter and may have to purchase my first G-series soon!

Saijem is right though. If this is your first foray into the "premium" p&s market you really can't go wrong with an LX-3 for as cheaply as they are selling these days...

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 6, 2013)

pretty much all cameras discontinued so long ago are cheap, especially the least desired (sorry to say). that is nothing special.

indeed the very bulky g15 doesn't seem like a bad choice, although you might be able to do better. although this would not be my personal choice, an LX7 with familiar interface may be a pleasant upgrade for you.

1 upvote
austin design
By austin design (Apr 6, 2013)

@ Timmbits: the G15 is "very bulky"? -- really?! It's truly pocketable, and seems downright diminutive next to its direct competitor, the very nice P7700. Have you actually handled a G15? I have, and found it astonishingly light. If you describe that camera as very bulky, what words are left to describe larger cameras -- like everything in Sony's NEX series, or Fuji's X series, let alone DSLRs (and last I checked, DSLRs seem to remain pretty popular)? Seems your reference point is a smartphone.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 6, 2013)

I wouldn't say the G15 is "bulky", but I also would say it's "diminutive" compared to the P7700, which is one of the larger compacts on the market. Both are excellent cameras, but not pocketable like an S110 or P330.

http://camerasize.com/compare/#383,364

1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

Anything that doesn't fit in my pant's pocket is relatively bulky IMO... So I'd consider anything beyond the S110/RX100 (and P330/LF1) to be bulky. That seems to be where most people (and DP Review) draw the line.

The difference between the P7700 and the G15 is pretty irrelevant if you're gonna have it hanging from your neck/shoulder, heck the difference between either one and a lot of mirrorless ILC with a pancake lens are pretty slim too.

I'd imagine most of those fit just fine in a large jacket pocket, tho I've never understood the draw of that (unless you live someplace where it's winter year round?).

0 upvotes
Saijem
By Saijem (Mar 30, 2013)

Save your money and buy a good LX3 and you'll be pleasantly satisfied. I am looking at all of these cameras and I find that they all have their pluses and they are all great in their own way. Credit is due to all of them. But... You can go to B&H and get a used LX3 with a 24-60 f/2.0-2.8, extremely well built, for just over $150.00.

Kick this one around until the next batch of super compacts come out and you'll be happy you did. Just my opinion. Thanks for the great comments!

4 upvotes
Future user
By Future user (Mar 23, 2013)

It's impressive how much better these tiny sensors got in the past few years, even beating some older yet much bigger sensors in the noise and DR department...

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 6, 2013)

Really? You think so?
If you owned a large sensor camera, you wouldn't be saying that.
I used to say the same thing, before I experienced large sensors.
Results and user experience in the field and real life situations are quite different from results on paper or these test shots they do in a controlled lab environment.
Of course, everything is relative... I'm assuming you mean sensors smaller than the rx100 or Fuji, and are referring to large sensor cameras more recent than the stone age of digital, because that's not hard to beat.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
riddler2013
By riddler2013 (Mar 21, 2013)

Having a look at the studio scene comparison, it seems that the Canon S110 provides slightly worse image quality than its successor the S100 (having a look at letters e.g. bottle or watch). This is explainable for the JPEG results as the default post processing may reduce the detail. However, this effect is also visible for the RAW results. Both have the same sensor and lens. Is it possible that you had a slightly different setup in your studio scene regarding lightning or focusing?

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 6, 2013)

There has been much inconsistency and quality control variations with the Canon. You must be quite the Canon fan in order to even look at that series, because a shot in the dark, any one of these, beats the canon by a mile!

2 upvotes
Simon Grimshaw
By Simon Grimshaw (Mar 16, 2013)

RX100 is a great camera, but it is not 20x zoom. Suggest you read the review.

1 upvote
Joellerealtor
By Joellerealtor (Mar 16, 2013)

Looking for a pocket size only 20 x zoom with phot stitching
And fast shutter sped fr a safari. Is the rx100 right ? Thanks you

0 upvotes
NiallM
By NiallM (11 months ago)

Get a Pentax Q, laughably underrated, tiny, very cheap now, and huge huge huge gain in zoom with the crop.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
threed123
By threed123 (Feb 27, 2013)

I chose the RX100 for a trip to Germany rather than taking my Canon T3i along. I also took a Panasonic 3D1 along for 3D. I had each in a small case attached to my pants belt. I used the 3D1 for most snapshots and the RX100 for scenics. And wow, the RX100 truly did the job, and the panoramic mode is jawdropping. I've got some outstanding castle/river shots. I created a 15'x11.5' photo book through My Publisher using their hi-res glossy lay-flat paper, and far exceeded my expectations. The panoramas fit across two pages thus some being 11.5"x30" and everyone that sees them are amazed at the image quality. The 3D1 does a reasonable job for 2D images as well. The two cameras were a great combination, and I'm now selling my T3i on ebay. If I do miss something about the DSLR, it would be the need for a greater zoom, but as I found out, the resolution is so good on the RX100, you can simulate a 200+ zoom with little loss. I feel the need, the need for more travel.

1 upvote
tombell1
By tombell1 (Feb 26, 2013)

Well I have never got on with my LX5 ... something about the colour rendition.
Also I want to have a camera that will fit in a relatively small pocket.

Looking now the Fuji ... is ok to hold , looks fabulous, has a larger sensor and is in the UK about £100 + cheaper than any of the others.

I would have looked at the XZ2 but really do like having the wide angle ...more important to me than the tele

0 upvotes
Elisenda Barcelona
By Elisenda Barcelona (Feb 23, 2013)

I'm an Olympus c-5060 enthusiast since 2004 when I read it's full review in dpreview! I love it's image quality, It's external direct controls, It's manual features, It's compact body and it's fully articulated LCD for macro pictures.
I would like to buy a new compact camera and I'd appreciate comments about macro features of Nikon p7700 and olympus xz-2. Thanks in advanced

1 upvote
areichow
By areichow (Feb 27, 2013)

You might get more info if you post this in the Nikon Coolpix or Olympus Compact forum(s)- I'm sure you'll get a bunch of feedback as well as images.

0 upvotes
Elisenda Barcelona
By Elisenda Barcelona (Feb 27, 2013)

Thanks, I'll try it.

0 upvotes
LauraBarrett
By LauraBarrett (Feb 23, 2013)

I am a novice and although this article was descriptive and informational, I am still not sure which would capture the Aurora Borealis best. The viewing is at night between 10PM and 5AM and I am taking pictures of the sky. Any suggestions? It will be used for other trips but this is coming up and I want to be able to take the best pictures possible. Suggestions??

0 upvotes
johnt1
By johnt1 (Feb 24, 2013)

I'm also a novice and bought the RX100 for just this purpose. The downsides are that the camera is a bit difficult to operate with gloves on, but otherwise very happy with it.

0 upvotes
areichow
By areichow (Feb 26, 2013)

IMHO, the RX100 is the best camera for doing astrophotography or getting photos of the Northern Lights. The second best would be the LX7, with its bright lens and super long exposures (250 seconds). I'd avoid the Canon G15 and Canon S100- both are limited to ISO 80 on longer (> 1") exposures, which will make getting good shots of the Northern Lights very hard IMHO.

Not sure if this lets me post links- but here's a great example from the RX100 taken in AK:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mkbergy/8099176525/

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 6, 2013)

I just want to contribute, concerning Nikon's night scene mode, and the software algorithms they use. I used to own a Nikon P7000. You'd think that cameras with a faster lens would beat the pants off of it. I replaced it with an Olympus XZ1 with a fast 1.8 lens. But night shots from the Oly were disastrous compared to the Nikon with f2.8 lens. Numbers don't tell all. You need to try them out.
For aurora, you don't need high resolution. You need a bigger sensor, a bright lens. They move, dance, so you don't want to keep the shutter open too long. Which disqualifies many small sensor cameras and ones with tiny photosites.
Ideally, FF or APS-C. Something like a Fuji X100S or XE1, or perhaps a Samsung NX series with their fast 30mm lens. Any apsc really, but Samsungs are affordable and compact. Other choices are Sony NEX but the lenses are heavily criticized, Fuji XE1 is nice although it's rather expensive but great 35mm f1.4 lens, and there's Canon M but heavily criticized camera.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
robinl59
By robinl59 (Feb 19, 2013)

I read this article with great interest and really wanted to buy the Nikon 7700 - especially since I am a Nikon DSLR user with compatible flash etc. But then I looked at the price and considered a P7100. In the UK you can buy a new P7100 for £229 whilst the P7700 costs at least £150 more. Would I feel/see the benefit? Now I like the latest technology as much as the next man but ....... I bought a P7100 and really don't regret it.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Feb 22, 2013)

The P7100 was even slower in operation than the P7700 and its lens is a stop slower across its range. The P7700 is better than the 7100 in many respects.

1 upvote
robinl59
By robinl59 (Mar 1, 2013)

I don't question the improvements of the P7700. My post simply questioned the value of the improvements over the P7100 taking into account the price differential.

0 upvotes
Hagey
By Hagey (Feb 18, 2013)

I purchased the P7700 and i am extremely pleased. Picture quality is very good with the external controls very intuitive. Every review i have read has mentioned the slow write times for raw files, it takes two seconds with an Extreme 45mb/s so i can only assume that i have a one off (lucky me).Although not super compact i personally walk around with the camera in hand so the bulk isnt a problem to me. I can use my existing Nikon flash gear and commander mode works very well indeed. Auto focus could be faster but thats on everyones wish list. I managed to find this genuine U.K camera for £300, bargain.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 13, 2013)

Predictions for next generation, imho:
Panasonic, Olympus: we doubt they cannibalize MFT sales by offering 1" sensors... they will drag out the small sensor as long as they can, adding only phase detection, while Olympus catches up with a brighter lens.
Fuji will likely stay with 2/3" but hopefully moving to brighter f/1.4 lenses.
Samsung will likely add phase detection and more zoom range.
Nikon may wake up and offer fixed lens version of their 1 series, to compete with the rx100 - although terms of their sensor sourcing contract with Sony are not public - there may be a non-compete provision in there to protect the rx100 - and having the longest zoom range in the group phase detection is the only place left to go.
Sony is an exciting one to watch with their 1" sensor and fast lens, we are all eager to see if they can further improve the lens technology, stretching sharpness towards the edges and making it brighter at telephoto.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jan 31, 2013)

I got my wife the Fuji XF1 for Christmas. She's a hopeless point and shooter so I thought the EXR mode would give her a helping hand. I wasn't quite expecting the results she got. Beautiful colours, sharp, well framed and great exposures. Even silhouetted shots towards the sun were stunning.

The EXR really helped her out. This is genuinely a high end P&S. I find the lens mechanism slightly convoluted and vulnerable but everything else is just perfect for a pocket camera. Good looks. Feels good in the hand and the output is fantastic.

5 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 13, 2013)

indeed the exr modes are something that get overlooked in head to head technical comparisons.
have her give the b&w film modes a try too.

1 upvote
vodanh1982
By vodanh1982 (Jan 30, 2013)

How come the G15 has Gold Award but recommended others do not?

3 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Feb 22, 2013)

Because the G15 has undergone the full review process and most of the others haven't.

0 upvotes
Braindad
By Braindad (Jan 26, 2013)

To say that the Olympus is better because of the longer lens is to ignore the unique utility of 24mm wide angle. I love my LX3 and now would not buy a pocketable camera with less than a 24mm lens. It is a big issue for me, obviously not for everyone. Good pictures can be had by all these cameras. I wish that the RX100 had a wider lens.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Jan 26, 2013)

although I have stopped using 1/1.7 format sensor cameras,
many of these would make an excellent gift for my 7 year old,
for her to learn photography with.
which one of these is coming down the most, and the fastest, in price?

1 upvote
FBreview
By FBreview (Jan 21, 2013)

Hi,

I own a Fuji XF1 since 2 month and I'm not disappointed at all.
I usually shoot with reflex (D90, D5100) and one year ago I decided to buy something "more" pocketable, so at that time, I went for a P7100 which was a serious compact (not really pocketable but more purse-able). Problem: IMHO the color rendering is not satisfactory, so I use it only in B&W and it's doing really good in monochrome!
So, I was still looking for a good compact. When I saw the XF1 that was love at first sight: classic design, manual zoom, 12 MP CMOS sensor.It had to be mine. And I'm not disappointed: colors are great, dynamic range is outstanding with the EXR mode and even at 6MP you can have big enough photos on your monitor or on paper. The opening of the lens is a bit fiddly, but you get rapidly accustomed to and really enjoy this lovely camera.

2 upvotes
koolerking
By koolerking (Jan 16, 2013)

Hi,

I've been doing lots of research on a advanced pocketable camera. I'm very near purchasing the S110, but could anyone tell me if there is another camera thats very slightly bigger than the S110 but with a faster lens (but still 24mm), still able to put in your pocket, with manual control, and a better battery life. It probably doesn't exist as I think I've exhausted the possibilities!

I have mu Nikon D7000 for my work, a Lumix LX3 for carrying around, but I've really not taken the LX3 out with me for a while as its still not really pocketable and I'm pretty sure the Lx5 and now the LX7 aren't any smaller, but I would still like a smaller wide lens camera with the same sort of control over the shot and a bright lens. On top of that I really don't want to spend the Sony RX100 type of money (plus it's not as wide.)

Any ideas on something in this advanced class that's between the S110 and a LX# in size?

Cheers

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Jan 26, 2013)

You might like to take a look at the aperture equivalency graphs of this test group. The S110 is the worse choice you can make - any shot inthe dark and you will do better. Not only that, also consider manufacturing inconsistencies and problems that have been plaguing this category for Canon over the past years.
You already own the wide angle you want- why not get something different? Or why not just order extra batteries on ebay. You can get worse batteries, but you can get better too - look at the mAh. With each camera I purchase, I order two extra batteries - a spare to carry just in case, and an extra in case I didn't get around to recharging them which might come at the wrong moment.
Have you considered the Fuji XF1? It's sensor is nowhere nearly as large as the RX100's, but it is about 50% larger than the 1/1.7" in most of these cameras. The Fujis has 3 EXR modes, including dynamic range.
BTW, another talent of your Nikon D7000 is it's exceptionally good night mode.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Jan 26, 2013)

Correction: I've been looking at the X10 in the graph, not realizing there were 2 Fujis in the graph above (page 2). The XS1's data isn't much better than the S110... unless you consider 2 of it's 3 EXR modes that double the effective size of the pixels through pairing, which would change this significantly (but those 2 modes also halve the resolution).
If I were you, I would hold it out until next round of product launches, to see if there will be more offerings with larger sensors, especially 1".

0 upvotes
sggclark
By sggclark (Jan 14, 2013)

So I walked in the Camera shop with a handful of hard earned cash all set to buy the RX100 (£479) after reading the great review, however, when I actually had a quick go with it I found the operation a bit fiddly (big hands) and the lens ring adjuster really frustrating. The helpful chap in the shop said that Canon has better features for much less (S110 On offer at £359) it just can't match the sensor and the f1.8 the RX100 offers as discussed in the review. I hadn't really considered the S110 as I thought it was expensive for what you get at the original price of £430 and too close to the price of the RX100

So what to do, is it really worth the extra £120 for the RX100 20MP or is the Canon a bargain at £359. I fear I would always live to regret not spending the extra, if I did could I live with its shortfalls and lack of features the S110 now has? I own a D90, which I love, but I travel light for work so a compact at the ready is where I want to go

I would really welcome any advice

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Jan 14, 2013)

I own an RX100 and have used an S100 extensively (pretty similar to the S110). The image quality of the RX100 is another world. The RX100's f1.8 goes away very quick but at wide angle (not even 35mm, it's already much less bright) it delivers better image quality than your D90. Really, I'm not exaggerating. It has better low light performance than most kit lens APS-C DSLR's at 28mm. In comparsion, the canon gives results much more like a compact camera. The wide end of the S110 is outclassed by nearly everything with a larger sensor.

Operationally, the RX100 has foibles it's true. However, if you intend to leave it at 28mm auto and fire away, there is nothing short of a very good APS-C lens on a current DSLR that is noticeably better. I shoot wide, so that works for me.

Now, if you shoot tele only and never wide, the RX100 is way overpriced and the S110 is no better than a standard elf for 3x the money. They're both wide focused cameras.

3 upvotes
sggclark
By sggclark (Jan 15, 2013)

Mosc, many thanks for your advice... the key, as you say, is the image quality and that is essentially what you pay for. Interestingly I have seen the RX100 advertised at £404 on the SLRHUT website, which certainly makes the difference.

0 upvotes
piratejabez
By piratejabez (Jan 17, 2013)

sggclark,
I have used the S100 extensively, and I would say go for the RX100. The S100's image quality is really not that great, and the color rendition is rather poor with Adobe RAW conversion. The S100/110 is likely best for it's very small size, but if you don't mind the extra bulk (and, I hear, potentially frustrating interface) of the RX100, I imagine the cost would be well justified. (I grabbed the LX7 for much less than either, and while IQ is a far cry from the RX100, I am still extremely satisfied.)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 13, 2013)

If you absolutely can't stand the RX100's ergonomics, I believe that in terms of IQ, there are better 1/1.7" cameras than the s110... just look at the aperture equivalency graph - a shot in the dark and you'll do better - literally, with any one. The Fuji X10 should be going into liquidation and a steal (with the introduction of the x20), with it's 2/3" sensor and great showing in the graph. it has nice EXR modes too, not evaluated in this lineup. Panasonic LX7 has been reported at astonishing savings.
You may have just been dealing with a crafty salesman who knows they have to unload their s110 models in light of the reviews. Also, the s100 model has had important quality consistency issues with the lens.

2 upvotes
donradams
By donradams (Feb 22, 2013)

I've had great results with my Canon S95. If you're willing to shoot in raw and edit your photos the results are very good. Took my S95 on a Mediterranean Cruise, shot 1500 photos, and have no regrets. Loved that I just could stick the camera in my shorts pocket (it was summer) and it was always with me, safe, immediately at hand.

0 upvotes
dddesign
By dddesign (Jan 13, 2013)

Reading this review makes me question the bias that DPR has for longer reach zooms over wide angle. Personally, I'd much rather opt for a wider angle than say a zoom that is 112mm equiv instead of 80 or 90mm. In most cases the longer reach can be countered by a tighter crop. However, the difference between 24mm and 28 is there is a whole lot of image that will never be recorded in the first place. Let's face it many people will be using these cameras in social situations often close up group shots. My experience is I'm often using a camera at it's widest setting 24mm, even 18mm equiv when I'm using my wide angle zoom on my Oly epl-2. The same goes for landscapes. So it is with some frustration that the options for me are limited with compacts. I'd buy either the RX100 or the XZ-2 in a flash if they had a wider angle lens.

I'm just wondering does anyone feel the same, or am I the odd one out here?

5 upvotes
jimjim2111
By jimjim2111 (Jan 14, 2013)

Agreed.

1 upvote
Joeri Porta
By Joeri Porta (Feb 11, 2013)

I couldn't agree more!
I really can't imagine that manufacturers don't know they could sell twice as many camera's if they had 24mm.

1 upvote
zlosyn
By zlosyn (Feb 26, 2013)

I agree, and therefore the LX7 is the choice

1 upvote
Tapper123
By Tapper123 (Mar 9, 2013)

Definitely. Hopefully Sony somehow manages a 24mm wide end on the next RX camera. Even if it makes it a little bigger (but only just a little), I think it would be worth it.

I would also like to see an option to use the NEX EVF. And while I'm dreaming, add a tlit/swivel screen too. It would only add a few mm in thickness, and would be so worth it. The tilting screen on my NEX F3 is damn useful and fun.

0 upvotes
Greg A Lach
By Greg A Lach (Jan 12, 2013)

Is it only the Canon G15, Fuji X10 and the Samsung EX2F that have a dedicated AEL button ? Of the others, can they all have it allocated to a programmable function button?

Also,

1. What is the maximum aperture of each camera at 50mm equivalent?

2. From a purely image quality basis (in RAW ) how do the cameras compare at 50 mm ?

Any guidance would be appreciated, thanks.

1 upvote
canonalex
By canonalex (Jan 7, 2013)

Thanks guys for a fantastic review, I was dithering on what to get and the article really helped in formulating my priorities. Thanks also to the people that wrote to Comments which also helped in making up my mind.
I loved the feel of the RX100 so that's what I ordered.
Cheers everyone.

0 upvotes
paganetc
By paganetc (Jan 5, 2013)

What about the shutter lag comparison fro these cameras? I consider this as a one of the most important parameters, much more than a design or wifi or touchscreen.
Do the Dpreview has some data on this matter?

2 upvotes
chosenwonton
By chosenwonton (Jan 5, 2013)

I just bought the Olympus XZ-2 after reading this, and many, many more articles between the RX100 and XZ-2 - I went with the Olympus mainly because I really find flip out screens very useful, the image quality is very close to the RX100, and it just seems to be more versatile all around. Having a usable camera is always top of my list, and while I appreciate the large sensor in the RX100, that seems to be its one trick, whereas the XZ-2 many.

Also was able to find the XZ-2 for $100 less than the RX100, but that weighed little on my decision. If they wanted perfect - I wish it had a 24mm wide lens, but hey :) - its got most everything else I was looking for.

Haven't got it yet (should be here in a couple of days) but looking forward to it. Have not read a poor review on it yet, so hopefully it fits me well.

4 upvotes
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