User Review: Gura Gear Kiboko 30L Backpack

Gura Gear's Kiboko 30L weighs in at only 4 pounds but can accommodate two pro level DSLR bodies and a wide range of lenses and accessories.

User Review: Gura Gear Kiboko 30L Backpack

Outside of a camera and lens, I'd argue that few things can have as much impact on your photographic travels as your camera bag. And over the years, I've come up with a wish list for the perfect bag. For starters, it needs to be compact and light, yet able to hold a multitude of items in a way that makes each one accessible at a moment's notice. And because I'm often hiking to my destination, it should be comfortable to carry over long distances and be water-resistant.

In my quest for the perfect bag, I've tried most of the big name brands. And while they all touted different features and strengths, I've found many of them to be too bulky and uncomfortable to carry. Another big issue for the locales in which I typically shoot is the amount of dust, dirt and sand that ends up in the bag itself, no matter how careful I am.

Recently though, I had the opportunity to test a bag from a small company you may not be familiar with. The company is Gura Gear. Its founder, Andy Biggs, is himself a wildlife photographer. His background as a seasoned professional shows through in the designs of the Gura Gear bags. They're simple, practical and even ingenious in some respects.

Currently Gura Gear has just three products in its lineup, a shoulder bag and two backpacks. I tested its largest bag the Kiboko 30L backpack. As the name implies, it has a 30 liter volume capacity, which is sufficient to hold just about anything I'd reasonably want to bring on a professional photo expedition.

Upon receiving the Kiboko 30L, I had two conflicting impressions. Its unique design -  two separate flaps that open in a butterfly style - immediately won me over (more on their significance in a bit). Yet I must admit that the bag looks quite small and well, cheap.

The Kiboko 30L features an innovative two-compartment 'butterfly' design so that you can access only the gear you need, while the rest remains protected from the elements. The waist belt is removable and the entire harness system retracts into built-in zippered sleeves, giving the bag a slimmer profile for convenient hand carrying or stowage.

Fortunately, the Kiboko 30L only looks small. After spending a few weeks using the bag, the word 'compact' seems to be a more suitable description. Indeed, nearly all of the gear I usually pack into my LowePro Trekker 600 – whose footprint is more than twice that of the Kiboko – fits comfortably in the Gura Gear backpack. I can carry two DSLR bodies, 6-8 lenses, filters and the usual bits and pieces. The only point where the bag's two compartment design struggled even a bit was with my Canon 1Ds Mark III with an attached custom L-bracket. It’s a tight fit, but it does go in.

The 'cheap' look that caused initial concern comes down to the use of a highly unusual material for camera bags: sailcloth. High end sailcloth is very light, extremely durable and anything but inexpensive. In my time using the bag it had to endure mud, sand, rock and other unpleasant and sharp surfaces. And the external fabric has come through no worse for the wear. The weight savings you get with this material is an added bonus. The unpacked weight of the Kiboko 30L is only 4 pounds/1.8 kilos which is about half the weight of some competitors' comparably sized offerings. And one actual benefit to a 'cheap-looking' bag is that it doesn't cry out, 'Camera bag! Expensive equipment inside!'.

There are several innovative ideas built into that bag that make a big difference. The rain cover can be retrieved from its compartment and fitted over the bag in seconds (doesn’t sound very sexy, I know, but very important when the need for it suddenly arises). The entire harness can be stowed away, which turns the Kiboko into a handbag with grips on the top and one side. The most ingenious idea however is the butterfly style front flap. The bag is basically divided into two main compartments, each accessible separately.

With two separate side-by-side compartments you can reach the gear you need while keeping one compartment completely zipped. And unlike traditional single flap designs, these flaps, when open don't sit on the mud or dirt surface, minimizing the chance of debris being transferred to your stowed gear.

This means less exposure to the elements for your gear and less dirt, dust and sand in the bag. And the customizable layout of the bag (which comes with a generous supply of Velcro dividers) makes it easy to access any piece of equipment in an instant.

For me, however, all of these features take a back seat to my comfort. Can I carry my gear for hours without ending up with a broken back? The Kiboko 30L is without question the most comfortable backpack I ever used. The bag's compact design coupled with its high quality adjustable harness makes for a great fit and feel.

A bag with great features means little if its literally a pain to carry. Yet even after a three-hour hike the Kiboko still felt pleasantly comfortable on my back. In addition to the Kiboko 30L, Gura Gear offers a smaller 22 liter capacity backpack (left) as well as a 24 liter capacity shoulder bag (center).

One glaring omission for me though is the lack of a means to carry a pro level tripod. You can attach a small travel/holiday oriented tripod, but not the more substantial ones a dedicated landscape photographer like me needs to use. At this price - and for the user at which its aimed - I would also like to see security straps (like the ones below) included. It would also be nice to have waterproof seams along the zippers.

Security straps like the ones shown here are probably not high on most photographers' must-haves lists. But if a zip fails these straps can prevent a major loss of equipment. As such, I would have liked to have seen them included with the Kiboko 30L.

At a retail price of US$429, the Kiboko 30L is one of the more expensive photo backpacks on the market, but the use of top-grade materials and a five year warranty do help soften the blow. Overall I find the Kiboko 30L to be a fabulous backpack and I highly recommend it to any serious landscape, wildlife or outdoor photographer who travels regularly with a large amount of equipment. 

What I like

  • Very lightweight
  • Comfortable to carry
  • Unique 'butterfly' compartment design
  • Easy access to equipment
  • Compact appearance with impressive capacity
  • Retractable harness
  • Removable waist belt

What I don't like

  • Very expensive
  • No harness for pro level tripods
  • Lacks waterproofing along zipper seams
  • No security straps

Carsten Krieger is a professional landscape and wildlife photographer based in the West of Ireland and author of several books on the Irish landscape and nature. To find out more about his work please visit his website: www.carstenkrieger.com.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 112
SafariSlim
By SafariSlim (Jul 27, 2012)

As an avid safari photographer I'd been looking for something more lightweight than the mainstream camera bags. For those who aren't aware, many african airlines place weight restrictions on your total luggage (20kg). So in my quest to find a lightweight bag with sufficient protection for all of my gear I came across the Kiboko 30L. Despite its name (Kiboko means hippo in Swahili) as Carsten points out it only weighs 1.8kg.

It doesn't look like a camera bag, so I don't get asked many questions when transiting through Africa, it fits all of my gear in it:
Nikon 200-400mm f/4
Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8
Nikon 50mm f/1.4
Nikon 16-35mm f/4
Nikon D4
Nikon D800
Nikon 1.4x TC
Nikon 2.0x TC
Fujitsu life book tablet
Chargers, spare batteries, filters, you name it.

The only thing that I really yearned for was a place to properly store my laptop. Bang, along comes the Kiboko 22L. Surprisingly everything fits in this smaller model.

I'd say like, but it really is love.

2 upvotes
KCBKCB
By KCBKCB (Jul 19, 2012)

After reading this review I just had to put in my two cents. I purchased the Kiboko bag when it 1st came out. No it is not cheap. However, after 3 trips to Africa, one trip to Europe, the Caribbean, and multiple other trips around North America I can give a pretty solid view. In Africa on multiple occasions I had to crawl through the Bush dragging this bag behind me while it was tied my leg, so I could get into position to get the shots I needed. I have completely and totally used this bag, and yet it still lives. I would recommend this bag to anybody who is serious about their craft. Not only is this bag built to last, but it has successfully fit in all of the overhead compartments of both the large and small aircraft I have flown on. The harness system works great and is comfortable. This is by far the best and most versatile camera bag I have had the privilege to purchase. I also purchased the Chobe bag for trips requiring less gear. And it is equally as impressive. Thanks.

1 upvote
DRLYON
By DRLYON (Jul 7, 2012)

First, I'm a NOVICE photographer that realized on day one a bag can make or break a traveling photographic trip. Not really knowing what I was doing, I bought about 8 bags. They were all good bags such as Kato, Lowepro, and Tarmac, but something was always missing. Then one day I ran across a review about a eclectic little company! The bag was the Kiboko 30L and I instantly took a double take. I got it and LUV'd it! I couldn't believe how light and durable it was. I also couldn't believe how much stuff I get in it. What is really a design god sent is that it fits nicely in a planes overhead bin even in the smaller bin sizes. When the company came out with there Chobe 24L I ordered it immediately. I now, with both bags, can stuff everything I need on a day trip. I agree with others that the one thing missing is a tripod clip. While the bag is not cheap, in my humble opinion as a novice, this is the BEST bag on the market for what it is designed for. Don't let the price scare you off.

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Jul 5, 2012)

I looked at the 22 litre one but discarded it as there is no facility for a shoulder strap when the harness is put away.

I think a shoulder strap for lugging it around terminals where carts are not allowed and so on would be useful - just a couple of large D rings on one side please.

0 upvotes
jimrpdx
By jimrpdx (Jun 24, 2012)

My back hurts just looking at the top photo. Thank goodness I don't take photography "seriously" if that's what it takes!

1 upvote
Artak Hambarian
By Artak Hambarian (Jun 23, 2012)

Guys, here is my position: any landscape photographer needs to workout hard in the gym. One simultaneously will also get more healthy. Even by the end of one's life gym will help. Well, at least most of the photographic life may become more pleasant. And cameras get lighter too!

1 upvote
wy2lam
By wy2lam (Jun 23, 2012)

hm...looks a lot like Think Tank bags! Have anyone tried both?

1 upvote
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Jun 21, 2012)

Nice pack, a better option to using a LowePro? Maybe...

Personally, I only use these kinds of packs for hauling gear to a shoot on location, like for an ad shoot. I never use this stuff for my landscape images, while doing back country excursions which are often multi-day, several thousand feet of vertical loss or gain and yield by *far* the best images I make.

I have long since made my own system for carrying pro gear, D800, light weight 4x5 field camera, etc, with me on trips that yield truly exceptional and professional results. The system is simple, no one trick ponies, make as many things as you can do more than one thing. Use a beanie instead of a lens case...I can not wear a lens case if it starts snowing...
So we have yet another pack with no room for the most important equipment a good outdoor photographer needs, food, water, spare clothing, etc. Thanks, but no thanks...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
OSAM
By OSAM (Jun 22, 2012)

Very similar to my Lowepro Vertex 200. Except the Vertext has a tripod harness and waterproofed zippers on the larger compartments.

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Jul 5, 2012)

I too find it amazing so few camera bags allow space for anything else.

I don't do landscape that seriously but I often fly internally to a shoot and stay one or two nights there and then home. A single carry on that has a clothing compartment that can be left in the hotel and a camera bag that can be taken on location would be a great boon.

0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Jun 21, 2012)

Why bother with carrying so much and big gear, nothing like to use Micro 4/3 Camera and lenses system, image quality is good and cameras and lenses are small to carry.

Anyway the review is good.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
Jim Dougherty
By Jim Dougherty (Jun 21, 2012)

Like Galen Rowell, many of us like to create images in the backcountry. Next month I, along with my d800E/tripod/70-200/16-35/etc., my 52-yo wife, and several friends, will climb a number of 14,000-foot peaks in the "Chicago Basin" in the southern Rockies. We are okay with carrying 45-60 lbs several miles up mountainous slopes. We don't get cramps. Our backs don't ache. And some of the photos ain't bad.

Just sayin' -- one man's absurdity is another's bliss. Who's to judge?

p.s. For the Facebook pix I'll bring the S100, too -- the S95 died without warning in Durban last December due to "lens error."

0 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Jun 21, 2012)

Yeah, but you are doing the approach with that, not standing on Sunlight Spire with it. Ultimately, this kind of pack is for hauling gear to a location and spending maybe a couple hours there, it is not for true back country excursions.

Have fun in Chicago Basin, beware of the goats getting at your food and climb safe. Those peaks are some of my favorite 14'rs, and I have done them all...

2 upvotes
WayneHuangPhoto
By WayneHuangPhoto (Jun 21, 2012)

I think it's absurd to carry all your gear in one bag strapped to your back and go hiking or really to walk any long distances.

If you want to have cramps and back problems go for it.

Ever since getting a belt system, I will never carry a camera backpack on long trips ever again. You can walk around for hours with the weight around your waist rather than weighing down your spine. They can put all the padding and straps on the bag they want, it makes no difference.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Phil_L
By Phil_L (Jul 8, 2012)

Huh! Using a backpack you should adjust it so that you are carrying on your hips??

0 upvotes
richard cohen
By richard cohen (Jun 20, 2012)

can you fit a 500vr inside the bag?

also imo a real hiking pack has to accommodate a hydration bladder. very few bags do this (clik elite comes to mind). it's great to carry all that gear, but not if you get dehydrated along the way...

0 upvotes
KCBKCB
By KCBKCB (Jul 19, 2012)

I do believe he can fit the 500 VR in this bag. My 200 -400 VR this with no problem. Check on the site and I think they show the 500 in place. I hope this helps

0 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Jun 20, 2012)

Umm, who wants to go hiking with all that gear. Back problems inevitable. I'm an avid hiker, and I find that my S95 can do everything all that gear can do, all while fitting in my shirt pocket.

Flash: built in
Super wide angle: stitch function
Telephoto: ever heard of cropping?
Second body: my S95 hasn't needed a backup yet
Tripod (not pictured): image stabilization

Good luck with your chiropractor.

1 upvote
tlinn
By tlinn (Jun 20, 2012)

You've got everything covered but image quality. I took my 5D Mark II, lenses, and an S95 on a three week trip last year. I really enjoyed hiking with the S95; it was effortless. But when it came time to process my images I was always sorry I didn't make the effort to bring the 5D2. It's not that the S95 images were bad but compared to the IQ of the 5D2 files it wasn't even close. I realize I'm stating the obvious here but you seem to gloss over that aspect of the comparison.

5 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Jun 21, 2012)

I was being sarcastic.

I shoot primarily with my 5D2 bodies with lots of L glass (professionally). I also recently invested in micro 4/3, which I'm really excited about.

Some of what I said about traveling light I do stand behind. With too much gear weighing one down, photo ops become more limiting. With a lightweight system weighing 5 lbs, I can easily dayhike 15 to 20 miles, depending on terrain. With 30 lbs of photo gear, I can probably do 10-12 but it'll be tough and I won't be shooting that much.

No question...the IQ from my 5D2 system will blow away my S95. The m4/3 system that I recently invested in will be a good compromise.

2 upvotes
Binone
By Binone (Jun 22, 2012)

Like another poster wrote, you're sacrificing IQ - even if you're being sarcastic. I recently took a vacation where I would be doing a lot of hiking and I'm a senior citizen with back problems. I left the 5D2 and "L" glass home and brought a NEX-7 & Zeis lens, plus the kit lens. I didn't even feel the weight (only about a pound) and IQ is about as good as the 5D2, even in low light. Now, whenever I pick up the 5D2 it feels like a sack of bricks. I'm sold on the mirrorless system with one exception - when I'm shooting an event where the subjects are moving fast, the Sony simply isn't up to the task - auto focus is poor. So, I've got to use the 5D2. I just make sure that I don't have to carry it too far. And, I don't need an expensive backpack.

0 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Jun 25, 2012)

In my experience, the NEX-7 can provide IQ comparable to the 5D2, but only at lower ISOs. Anything above 400, forget about it.

Regardless, unless I'm shooting something for a project (paid or personal) that requires me to have quality images, I'm willing to sacrifice some IQ for comfort. I hike because I like to hike; often times the photography is secondary (again, unless it's for an assignment or personal project). My m4/3 camera provides perfectly adequate IQ, similar to my old 5D1 at low ISOs.

Also, I rarely print photos myself. Good IQ is necessary for clients, or for those few 20x30 inch and larger prints I occasionally make, but most of my hiking photos are only seen on a computer monitor, and the quality provided by the m4/3 cameras are more than enough.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
cancerrak
By cancerrak (Jun 20, 2012)

too expensive!

0 upvotes
chaking
By chaking (Jun 20, 2012)

If you have to put the tripod on the side where it's unbalanced, then it's not a hiking pack. Is there only one water holder? Can you strap a tent or any other gear on there?

Stop saying these are hiking packs when they're really just nice summer strolling packs. You cant go hiking with just camera gear... or if u do, then you are either ill prepared or not really hiking anywhere even remotely tough.

Hmm ... upon rereading I guess it isn't advertised as a hiking pack... oops

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
BayAreaMD
By BayAreaMD (Jun 20, 2012)

Few camera packs are really appropriate for serious 'hiking,' as I think you're defining it. For day hikes, though, this one works well. Water bottle held opposite side from tripod. No external storage. I keep food and light jacket inside. Day hikes only.

Cheers,
Marc

0 upvotes
BayAreaMD
By BayAreaMD (Jun 19, 2012)

I don't understand the "no tripod" comments. I've been using it with a Gitzo 3541XLS for quite a while, which is a big 'pod...with Markins M20 or RRS pano gear attached.

Admittedly, attaching to the side isn't the most balanced solution, but it works for me. I attach exactly as show on the gura gear web site:
http://blog.guragear.com/gura-gear-the-blog/2011/11/23/faq-do-kiboko-bags-allow-for-tripods.html

I find this plenty secure. I find only two minor drawbacks:
(1) balance a bit off
(2) the tripod extends above the back of the pack instead of dropping down. This can make scrambling through brush or under trees a bit more awkward, imo.

I really like it, especially the weight savings and the ease with which the zippers work. I'll take these 'fast' zippers with a raincover over the sticky, sealed zippers anyday.

Marc

2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jun 20, 2012)

Marc, sometimes we have to take health issues into consideration. I'm one of those who criticised this bag for having no proper harnessing for a tripod. 12 years ago I underwent surgery to remove a cervical hernia, and this made me especially aware of these issues. Carrying an unbalanced package for hours may end up compromising your spine. I'm a strict amateur - I don't make a living out of photography -, and I don't think it is worth compromising my health just for the sake of getting some good shots. Maybe I'd think otherwise if I were a pro. As I said before, I used to have a sling bag; I had to replace it for a Lowepro Pro Runner 300 backpack because long walks were starting to become painful. My new backpack carries the tripod dead-centre, properly harnessed and with a very clever pouch at the base to accomodate the feet, in order to lower its position. It works - all for a third of the Kiboko's price. As you see, the "no tripod" comments are not completely unfounded.

1 upvote
BayAreaMD
By BayAreaMD (Jun 20, 2012)

Manuel,

Point well taken. I totally agree that health has to come first. I also have a Lowepro with center tripod holder and agree that it's easier to handle the heavy tripod. Maybe I read the original review wrong, but it seemed to imply to me that a large tripod couldn't be held at all.

I own tons of bags -- the dreaded photographer's 'bag collector' problem. I specifically bought this one for its light weight (for its size), and would again. I was luck enough to get it at a discount barely used.

Marc

1 upvote
tlinn
By tlinn (Jun 20, 2012)

Neither lashing a tripod to the side of a pack (worst) or back of a pack (almost as bad) work for me. Either the pack is unbalanced or the weight is hanging too far away from my body. What really works well for me is attaching the tripod horizontally across the top of the pack. It is balanced and close-in to my body. The disadvantage is that it is wider than my body—I have to turn sideways occasionally to pass through a narrow passage—but the increased comfort is well worth it.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jun 21, 2012)

When you have carbon fibre legs and carry the head - which is considerably heavier than the legs - inside the backpack, the weight is not that far away from the body... and does your bag have harnesses to hold a tripod as you describe? I've seen bags that hold the tripod at the bottom - which lowers the centre of gravity -, but never at the top. What bag is that?

0 upvotes
Jim Dougherty
By Jim Dougherty (Jun 19, 2012)

I've been using the Mountainsmith Borealis AT for over a month now. I love it.
It holds my d800E and four lenses (including a 70-200) -- in the bottom half. Elsewhere it has a laptop/Camelbak compartment, plenty of space for camera accessories and outdoor gear - jacket, lunch, water, first aid kit, etc. etc.

My Gitzo lashes on in several places.

Its made of stout (recycled) material with heavy-duty, water-shedding zippers.
And it has a removal rainjacket.

Perhaps best of all, it has a sturdy waistbelt that transfers much of the weight to your hips.

It has no side/sling entry. But my d800E landscapes all require a tripod anyway. I carry a shirtpocket Canon S100 for wildlife and other snaps.

0 upvotes
RBFresno
By RBFresno (Jun 19, 2012)

HI!

Just did a 5 min "Google-search" on this bag.
Reports of easily torn handles (BH Photo site), cracked plastic frame hoop (Daypack Review), zippers that easily bind up, poor/loose stitching, etc.
Plus accessibility into the compartments (a strength of the 30L), is criticized by some users, especially the lower compartment.

2 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Jun 21, 2012)

Not to mention it weighs 5 pounds and has a totally usless 17" laptop compartment, yet another one trick pony pack....

0 upvotes
JosephScha
By JosephScha (Jun 19, 2012)

Re: "I have a camera bag. It's called my pocket."

I don't know what camera you have, but a pocket is not an ideal camera bag at all. It is warm and humid, and not well padded to protect the camera from a bump from the outside world.

I have both a small and larger interchangeable lens camera. Sometimes the small one is more appropriate. But often it's not. You are restricting yourself to cameras that fit in your pocket, I won't argue with your choice but be aware that you don't have to be a "pro" to want better image quality, and narrower depth of field, than any camera that fits in a pocket can give.

0 upvotes
Wye Photography
By Wye Photography (Jun 19, 2012)

I have a camera bag.

It's called my pocket.

Any camera that can not fit in my "camera bag" I do not want.

Horses for courses!

IF I were a professional (what % of DP readers are 'pros'?) then this bag would be brill.

0 upvotes
RBFresno
By RBFresno (Jun 19, 2012)

Believe essentially all the positives that are described in these comments , and discount the negatives, especially by those who have never used the 30L!

The dimensions & wt. savings are critical for those on international and small regional airplanes.
The 30 L is about 5 lbs < the Think Tank.

Too expensive?
On my last trip (to Tanzania) it was holding $25K worth of equipment! And I'm going to decide which bag to use based on a few hundred dollars? That's just silly.

Packed into my 30 L:

D3 (with L-bracket attached)
D4
Nikon 10.5 fisheye
Nikon 24-70
Nikon 70-200VR
Zeiss 100/2
500VR
1.4 and 2x TC's.
SB-900 flash
Binocs
Samsung Galaxy Tablet.

And then there were the assorted extra batteries, storage cards, Rocket blower etc (more than I can precisely itemize).

Some will need a bigger bag.

And, there's no such thing as the perfect bag. Different bags for different occasions.
But folks should at least be aware of the 30L. For some situations, I am unaware of anything better.

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
ianz28
By ianz28 (Jun 19, 2012)

Lowepro Vertex 200 AW $225-260 has been a perfect camera bag - and it looks like the most direct competitor.

All-weather with waterproofing along the zippers + rain gear, expandable, tripod harness, and a laptop compartment. A lot of zippered or Velcro pockets, and a very customizable camera compartment.

While the bag itself is slightly heavy it's perfect for hiking and for travel. It fits under the standard airline seat and I've had no problems with it as a carry on for any airline.

Personally, I thought the Lowepro was very expensive. I can't imagine paying almost 2x more. This reviewed bag is just too expensive given the available competition.

0 upvotes
RBFresno
By RBFresno (Jun 19, 2012)

The Lowepro Vertex 200 AW weighs 85% more than the 30L. I was already a tad overweight for one of my regional flights in Tanzania.

Also, the Lowepro has only one main compartment. I liked the idea of minimizing dust getting into my whole bag every time I accessed a lens.

If I'm carrying $25K worth of equipment, I'm not going to quibble over a few hundred more for a bag.

Heck, bicyclists will pay thousands more to shed a few pounds from their bikes

1 upvote
CameraCarl
By CameraCarl (Jun 19, 2012)

The Vertex 200 is clearly not a direct competitor to the GG bag. Perhaps if you look at the outside dimensions, but frankly, doing this can be misleading. I can fit the same amount of gear in my GG bag as I can in a Protrekker 600, a bag that is significantly larger and more expensive than the Vertex. As several of us have said, you can get two pro sized bodies, a super telephoto lens, four or more zoom lenses and even more in the GG bag. No way all this will fit in the Vertex 200. But if you don't need to carry a lot of gear, you don't need this bag, so why even comment. I certainly don't need my GG when I am only carrying my S100 around.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
ianz28
By ianz28 (Jun 19, 2012)

Why comment?

Based on the images and the 2 camera bodies + 10 lenses and flashes, laptop, misc junk I can cram into the lowepro it's a perfect comparison. Not only that but it's pretty important to be able to carry a tripod on the pack.

I highly doubt any more can be put in this bag than the Lowepro I mentioned.

If it's worth an extra $200 to save a couple of pounds for you have at it. It's not a bike and at the end of the day the 2 pounds isn't going to make my back and shoulders feel any better. On the other hand, not having to carry my tripod in my hands might save my butt when I slide on some damp rocks while out hiking.

If you are carrying $25,000 of camera equipment and don't care about spending $500 for a back-pack then why not just pay someone to carry it for you.

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (Jun 19, 2012)

If a bag has a laptop slot with a separate zipper, a "camelbak" style large water bladder can be stashed in the laptop slot. I have done this for a small bag. Also, "accessory" Camelbaks in nylon envelopes with tackle straps can be strapped to the outside of other bags. For shorter trips, two quart water bottles can be carabiner-ed onto belts, D rings, whatever.

This looks like an aspirational pack. Holds an 800mm f5.6 lens! What it doesn't mention is if it can be configured to hold some amount of ordinary camping gear as well.

1 upvote
CameraCarl
By CameraCarl (Jun 19, 2012)

There is no laptop compartment and this is not a camping/backpacking bag, but if you don't have a lot of camera gear, you can always carry the camera gear in one half and camping equipment for a day trip in the other. In one half of the bag I can fit a pro body, two big zoom lenses (like 70-200), two smaller zooms and batteries.

0 upvotes
Martin Ocando
By Martin Ocando (Jun 19, 2012)

I shoot with a Panasonic G3, a 20mm Aspherical lens, 14-42mm (28-84 equiv) a 45-200mm (90-400mm equiv) and a couple of legacy lenses, and everything fits inside a tiny LowePro belt bag. BELT BAG, ok? And the best part is, that RAWs are better quality than Canon's APS-C 18MP sensors. I know for a fact, since I used to own the 60D. HEHE. I love it. No need for these dinosaur camera bags and carrying so much weight. Let's just wait for what Schneider and Sigma will develop for m43, and more and more people will start looking into m43, seeking relief to their sore shoulders.

2 upvotes
Jim Scarff
By Jim Scarff (Jun 19, 2012)

I bought one shortly after it came out and LOVE it. My previous bag was a Lowepro Roadrunner AW which I still have, but very rarely use now. I bought the Kiboko 30L for international travel, but now use it all the time. The Roadrunner AW has wheels and is very secure....but very heavy (15+ lbs.?) The Kiboko 30L is about 4 pounds - a huge benefit.

I travel with a Canon 400mm DO lens, a 70-300mm L, 1.4X TC, a 7D and a 60D cameras, a medium weight carbon fiber tripod, flash, 18-135mm lens, etc. No problem fitting that all in/on the bag with quick access to everything.

The biggest challenge I see in travel outside the U.S. is the common 7 kg (15 lbs) weight limit for carry-on baggage. My experience is airlines enforce this. With the Kiboko I can pack my 2 cameras, and lenses and still be under. Plus although it is slightly longer than international length limits, it is soft and can easily be compressed to fit into the allowed volume. Never had a problem.

3 upvotes
AlexeyD
By AlexeyD (Jun 20, 2012)

Where did you get 7kg carry on limit from? I am flying in Europe and none of the airlines I used there had that limit (Lufthansa, BA etc) all state in fact that the weight of the carry on bag should be such that you yourself should be able to put it into overhead locker. The lockers on different planes also limited to hold certain amount of weight but usually it comes down to 20-23 kg per bag.

0 upvotes
RBFresno
By RBFresno (Jun 20, 2012)

To AlexeyD:
Your 'facts' are incomplete.

Ethiopian Airlines, which flies to Tanzania. limits carry on weight to 7 kg:
http://www.ethiopianairlines.com/en/travel/baggage/carryonbaggage.aspx

KLM states 12kg for carry on
http://www.klm.com/travel/us_en/prepare_for_travel/baggage/hand_baggage/index.htm

Luftansa states 8kgs:
http://www.lufthansa.com/us/en/Carry-on-baggage

BA states 23 kgs_and also you must be able to lift it.
http://www.britishairways.com/travel/bagcabin/public/en_us

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
1 upvote
tlinn
By tlinn (Jun 20, 2012)

Weight is an issue for regional flights in Costa Rica too. The limit is 25 lbs, if memory serves. The 4 lb savings of the 30L represents 20% of the allowable weight. That's not insignificant.

0 upvotes
AlexeyD
By AlexeyD (Jun 22, 2012)

To RBFresno:
My 'facts' are simply based on the fact that I just flew by Lufthansa from Germany to UK carrying photo backpack weighting 21kg with me on a airplane. I was asked at checking if I take it as a hand luggage and that is all. Besides, your 'facts' do confirm at least BA part of what I said.

0 upvotes
RBFresno
By RBFresno (Jun 22, 2012)

I agree!

I just wanted to point out to those who might not have known, that there is quite a bit of varaiability of weight, size, and enforcement, among airlines about carry on baggage. I'd hate to see someone attempting to carry on 20+ kgs and then be surprised by being denied or having to pay surplus charges.

For my uses, a single backpack, like lenses, will not meet all of my needs. That's why I have several, ranging from small bags that carry just a camera and a lens or two, to larger cases and packs that can hold tripods, gimbal and standard heads,multiple long lenses, multiple bodies, water, food, etc.
I can think of a number of scenarios where the 30L would be poorly suited, and other scenarios where it would be close to ideal.
I'm surprised by the number of comments in this thread that seem to imply one pack/bag is "the best". No such thing, any more than which of my lenses is the "best".
For my recent trip to Tanzania, for my needs, the 30L was great.

Best Regards,

RB

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
fz750
By fz750 (Jul 18, 2012)

I have been frequently flying around europe for 20 years (business and pleasure) and have been repeatedly pulled up for excess weight of hand baggage... (Swiss Airlines mostly..)

It's less now that you print your own boarding cards (and hence don't have to check-in at the airport) but i've even had the case taken off my at the gate when the plane was full of business people who always bring too much stuff in their hand luggage plus laptop etc and they were struggling to fit it all in the overhead lockers..

I wouldnt' want my camera gear going in the hold withoutit being in a secure or padded case..

0 upvotes
Jim Scarff
By Jim Scarff (11 months ago)

Where did I get the 7 kg limit for carry-ons? - Air New Zealand both internally and internationally. I have flown there 3 times from the U.S. in the last 4 years, and had my carry-on weighed on every flight. The 30L saved my neck as I was under the limit by only a few grams. Also Virgin Australia.

0 upvotes
Anthony Wooe
By Anthony Wooe (Jun 19, 2012)

I always wonder, if you are packing this on a 3 to 4 hour hike, full of equipment, where to you pack the 2 quarts of water, plus snacks. If you start out on a 3 to 4 hour hike here in Texas without enough water when it is hot, you can forget about making it back.

2 upvotes
tlinn
By tlinn (Jun 20, 2012)

I agree. I don't understand why a compartment to accommodate a Camelbak bladder isn't a prerequisite for a bag of this type.

0 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Jun 19, 2012)

Interesting concept, but the price puts them well above solutions from Think Tank or Photobackpacker (a bit different philosophy - directed to large format users) - so the bag should really be freakin' excellent to be worth the money.

0 upvotes
CameraCarl
By CameraCarl (Jun 19, 2012)

After buying six different backpacks, I bought the GuraGear Kiboko and it is the best camera bag I own. It holds everything I need on a major trip: 2 pro bodies, 500 f4, four other zoom lenses, hoods, two teleconverters, memory cards, rain covers, batteries, ball head, etc. It fits in US aircraft overhead storage bins including regional planes. The backpack is good enough for short hikes of less than a couple of miles. I've retired my LowePro Pro Trekker and sold several other bags. It is just as waterproof as all my other bags, which albeit don't have the special waterproof (and hard to operate) zippers a very few bags have. Two fellow photogs who have seen me use mine are now shopping for a Kiboko themselves. I do admit it is expensive, but considering that I carry well over $10,000 of gear in it and travel with it on some trips that cost many thousands of dollars, a few hundred dollars is a small investment.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
lovEU
By lovEU (Jun 19, 2012)

Ok, and how do you carry a pro tripod i.e. when hiking a couple of miles?

0 upvotes
TEBnewyork
By TEBnewyork (Jun 19, 2012)

I think there are many use cases for this bag and it isn't always hiking miles with photo gear. Part of the biggest challenge we sometimes face is just getting our gear from point A to point B on an airplane. I don't know of any other bag that can hold what this one does and still make it into overhead luggage bins on smaller aircraft.
Having an using a backpack style bag does not automatically assume extreme hiking.
Also, I've had my Gitzo 2541L attached to the bag and I don't remember having issues with it.

5 upvotes
CameraCarl
By CameraCarl (Jun 20, 2012)

I never strap my tripod to my bag. I have a Gitzo 3541XLS which would overwhelm any camera bag including my gigantic LowePro Pro Trekker. I simply carry my tripod in my hand or over my shoulder. I am a member of two camera clubs and have taken a dozen photo workshops out in the boonies. None of the dozens of photographers I know strap their tripods to their backpacks; every one carries theirs in their hands.

0 upvotes
lovEU
By lovEU (Jun 20, 2012)

Thanks guys, I just was wondering if the OP would have had a better idea than me, since "every one carries theirs in their hands" applies for me as well :-)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (Jun 19, 2012)

This is just too much money.

1 upvote
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (Jun 19, 2012)

Yeah ...way too much. People have way too much money to waste these days.

Actually ...it costs more than the camera I'm using these days ...ha.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Robert Hammer
By Robert Hammer (Jun 19, 2012)

Yes, but after you stuffed it full of cameras and lenses your equipment would far outweigh the price of the bag!

1 upvote
patphoto
By patphoto (Jun 19, 2012)

I've been looking at the Gura Gear bags for a while now, and so far what has stopped me was the high price. But I discovered today that there no waterproofing on the zippers, for me it's a big issue. The rain cover is used when you have a lot of rain for a long time, but for minor shower it's usually more an annoyance that you avoid due to the normal weather proofing of your bag. At least that what I'm doing with my many bags from other competitors that have sealed zippers.

0 upvotes
CarstenKriegerPhotography
By CarstenKriegerPhotography (Jun 19, 2012)

Personally I find "waterproof" zippers a bit of a fake. If there is only light rain or a short downpour normal zippers will hold back the water, if it is bucketing down for longer you need the rain cover anyway. I live in Ireland and believe me I know about rain!
C.

2 upvotes
Norsefire
By Norsefire (Jun 19, 2012)

Where are you getting the EU price from? I've been unable to find an EU retailer yet.

0 upvotes
PhD69
By PhD69 (Jun 19, 2012)

Hello,

Just have a look here... http://www.jama.fr/boutique/en/shooting/backpacks/kiboko-90

Best regards.
Philippe

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Norsefire
By Norsefire (Jun 20, 2012)

This is awesome, thank you!

0 upvotes
phudson126
By phudson126 (Jun 19, 2012)

The positive factors seem to be greater. I bet the camera is worth all its money going by the specs. Security strap is a welcome change. Can't wait to have my hands on it!!

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Jun 19, 2012)

This is wedding photographer backpack. Landscape photographers use huge backpacks with lots of stuff for several days survival. And there must be only two really good cameras.
1. Large format camera for shooting 200Mpx incredible shots.
2. Lightweight cameras always within reach. Fuji TX-1 (Hasselblad Xpan) is the best choice, but DSLR will do, too.
Yeah, this my IMHO.
superka-photo.com

1 upvote
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Jun 19, 2012)

is this advertorial?

if it is, then it should be flagged as such

6 upvotes
Amadou Diallo
By Amadou Diallo (Jun 19, 2012)

An advertorial is an addendum (usually a pullout or separate section) of a publication with content written or commissioned by the advertiser, accompanied by an actual advertisement from that company in the publication.

This article is a user review by a site contributor whose landscape photography tutorial ranks as the most read photo technique article we've published to date. Apparently some of our readers respect his opinion;-). Hence the review of a piece of gear important to anyone who has a lot of gear to carry on their photographic journeys.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
love_them_all
By love_them_all (Jun 21, 2012)

I wrote a similar comment and got quickly deleted by DPR.

1 upvote
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Jun 22, 2012)

the language used in the article is very advertorial
plus the photos were from the manufacturer......

BUT its good to know you will Flag advertorial.
( not that its bad, just so people know its advertorial )

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
adiprcike
By adiprcike (Aug 16, 2012)

I totally think its advertorial.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jun 19, 2012)

The 2-section 'butterfly' opening is clever, but this bag is absurdly expensive. I can't see anything that justifies the high price. On the contrary, the lack of harness for a tripod is a real deal breaker. My Lowepro 300 AW backpack may be heavier and slightly less practical, but it costs less than 1/3 of this bag's price, is weatherproof and carries any tripod comfortably.
Thanks but no thanks.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
CarstenKriegerPhotography
By CarstenKriegerPhotography (Jun 19, 2012)

I'd like to follow up on some of the comments. Yes, the Kiboko 30L comes with a raincover and it works very well, quick to put on and off and it does what it's supposed to do.
For longer hikes (6 hours or more) I use a belt bag for food and water goes into the side pockets of the Kiboko. Alternatively I only take basic equipment (1 body, 2 lenses) and assign one half of the Kiboko to food, water and other necessities.
As for the weight... I like my SLR and as long as I can I am happy to carry the weight.
Carsten

0 upvotes
mikeoregon
By mikeoregon (Jun 19, 2012)

Hi, Carsten-- What do you do with your tripod? Tx, Mike

0 upvotes
CarstenKriegerPhotography
By CarstenKriegerPhotography (Jun 19, 2012)

In hand or extra tripod bag over shoulder, not perfect but manageable and I hope Gura Gear hears my crying and improves the next Kiboko.
C.

0 upvotes
SmallSensorMan
By SmallSensorMan (Jun 19, 2012)

Dump all the stuff and buy a bridge camera - cheaper than the bag let alone the kit!

3 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jun 19, 2012)

Yeah, right...

0 upvotes
lovEU
By lovEU (Jun 19, 2012)

Thanks for your review, Carsten. But what's your approach for carrying a real tripod now? Can't believe you're doing it the way the image above implies (at least not for long travels :-)
http://2.s.img-dpreview.com/files/articles/1895767893/09052008163459_GuraGear019.jpg?v=1512

0 upvotes
CarstenKriegerPhotography
By CarstenKriegerPhotography (Jun 19, 2012)

The tripod issue is indeed the major fault of the Kibiko and, yes, at the moment I carry the tripod in hand or over the shoulder in an extra tripod bag.
C.

0 upvotes
dark goob
By dark goob (Jun 19, 2012)

Heard of mules?

0 upvotes
Jim in AZ
By Jim in AZ (Jun 19, 2012)

If I am going to carry all that gear I'll just dust off my GI issued alice pack.

0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Jun 19, 2012)

I've used numerous different "solutions" from various manufacturers to the problem of lugging FF DSLR kits around. However well designed they are - and no doubt this product is - the problem is ultimately the total weight, particularly if you also need to carry food, water, waterproofs etc.
The solution is to use smaller cameras and lenses. I recently bought an OM-D. What a revelation. The day of the dinosaur DSLR is surely numbered.
BTW the price of this bag is simply insane.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (Jun 19, 2012)

the price of the bag is insane ?
Don't you think that the price for the OM-D is equally insane ?
(it's a great little camera, but I did wish it was a little less insanely priced ... )

0 upvotes
Siddharth
By Siddharth (Jun 19, 2012)

I somehow find backpacks are very inconvenient when you need to quickly draw out or in your equipment. Also you will need to place your backpack on a firm ground before opening the same. I had purchased the Crumpler backpack thinking it would ease the weight on my shoulder but discovered it is far too difficult to walk around.
I guess it is good for trekking / climbing.
After too many permutations and combinations I have finally discovered my comfort bag i.e Retrospective 30 which houses my 5D3 and 3 L lenses and 580 EX comfortably. Yet shoulder padding of this bag is not good enough.
Still looking for better bags than this. Somebody has to come out with a magical design.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jun 19, 2012)

Nothing beats a good, well-designed backpack for ergonomics and weight distribution. Now there are lots of sling bags that promise fast access to the equipment, but they put too much stress on one side of the body and especcially on the neck. And they're not practical for carrying tripods. I had one of these sling bags, one from Lowepro: it was OK for short hikes, but it made my neck and left shoulder hurt after moderately long walks. There's really no alternative to backpacks when you carry the full monty - but they needn't be as expensive as this one!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Codik
By Codik (Jun 19, 2012)

This bag is clearly not for my needs. I'd kill my back carrying all that gear for 12 hours (regardless of the weight of the bag).

Also, if I spend 12 hours hiking with my gear, I need to be able to carry water, food, a book, and rain gear. Looks like there's no room for this in the bag.

In short, not for me. I need a bag that can carry one body, a couple of lenses, and plenty of hiking gear. Any suggestions?

3 upvotes
el_migu_el
By el_migu_el (Jun 19, 2012)

Sounds like the Satori EXP or the Tilopa BC from f-stop's mountain series could be something for you: http://fstopgear.com/en/product/mountain

I bought the Tilopa BC for the same reason, as-well as for a proper carrying system (frame).

0 upvotes
Grisha Kameraz
By Grisha Kameraz (Jun 19, 2012)

I had the same problem until i found this bag
http://www.tamrac.com/5550.htm
this is the tamarac adventure 10, it has enough space for my equipment and for the traveling needs for a days journey and even more if you travel light

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jun 19, 2012)

At the risk of sounding like I'm advertising the brand, I'd recommend Lowepro's Pro Runner backpacks. They're ergonomically well-designed, have a clever tripod harness, are weatherproof, roomy and highly customizable. And they're not expensive, too. Not too esoteric, I know, but a practical and no-nonsense design nonetheless.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yslee1
By yslee1 (Jun 19, 2012)

Bags need to stop opening from the front, and instead open from the back. I don't fancy having mud from the ground to end up on my back.

3 upvotes
MasterOfGoingFaster
By MasterOfGoingFaster (Jun 19, 2012)

This is the killer feature I'm waiting for. I need to tote a lot of gear, but I need to work out of it like a trunk.

0 upvotes
joejack951
By joejack951 (Jun 19, 2012)

The LowePro Flipside backpacks open from the back and they've been around for at least a few years now. I have a 300AW and love it. With the hip belt around my waist, I can hang the bag off the front of me and swap gear while I'm walking (though I usually stop).

1 upvote
Digital Daydream
By Digital Daydream (Jun 19, 2012)

The Lowepro Flipside series do just that. I've been using one for a few years and that's exactly why I got it.

0 upvotes
idbar
By idbar (Jun 19, 2012)

Most of the Vanguard backpacks open from the back, and have the side opening for easy access. Unluckily, some of them are expensive so I have a small slingbag which has worked well for me.

1 upvote
brudy
By brudy (Jun 19, 2012)

This is one of the things I like about my Kata 3-in-1 30. It opens from the side with the panel hinged at the bottom. It's very easy to access. My wife uses a tamrac where you have to unzip the bottom from the top and it's a total PIA.

As a separate issue, too many camera backpacks lack a way to attach or hold a water bottle.

0 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (Jun 19, 2012)

My Lowepro Flipside 400AW opens at the back. I use it all the time so it must be good because stuff that isn't ends up gathering dust very quickly.

I regularly carry a Sony A77 with CZ 16-80 attached (with lens hood attached ready to shoot). Sony 70-300G, Sony 500mm mirror, Sony 11-18mm (hood attached and ready) and a Minolta 28mm F2. There is still room for a gorilla pod tripod if I am not taking my monopod which fits nicely into the tripod strap.

If I know I will be using one of the long lenses right away such as when visit a bird sanctuary or whatever then it can easily be configured to carry the gear that way.

Best bag I have ever purchased.

0 upvotes
Peter KT Lim
By Peter KT Lim (Jun 19, 2012)

Sorry I am to old, I can't carry so much of gear at once........

0 upvotes
Klarno
By Klarno (Jun 19, 2012)

Not to say this bag isn't excellent on its own merits, but, can this hold a modest number of non-photo related accessories, like water (preferably in a camelbak bladder), food, flashlight, clothing for inclement weather? If not, how can this bag truly give you the ability to carry your gear for hours?

6 upvotes
Zhivko Yakimov
By Zhivko Yakimov (Jun 19, 2012)

I second that. In my view, the biggest deficiency of photo backpacks is that they almost always pay no attention to weather issues. I mean, it's fine that you can carry a lot of equipment, but I'd like to see some degree of weather proofness as well. For example, a rain cover for the back pack would be appreciated, as well as some option to store water, food and additional clothes.

As I see this backpack, it's mostly for driving yourself to a point, hiking for a couple of hours (in fairly good weather), then hike back, and continue to the next point. I wouldn't use this if I have to hike all day, say 5-6 hours at least.

0 upvotes
dtra
By dtra (Jun 19, 2012)

I think it does come with a rain cover. To me this backpack would be too big, the 22L might be better but still seems a bit bulky (laptop compartment not required), the way I see this bag being better utilised would be camera gear in one half (I really don't want to carry that much gear on a hike/trek, not even a massive telephoto lens), and then travel essentials in the other, food, water, sunscreen, etc, etc, there also seem to be a couple of thinner, smaller compartments on the front of the bag. The missing tripod support does seem like quite an oversight. It certainly looks interesting although a couple simple enhancements would make it even better.

0 upvotes
skyrunr
By skyrunr (Jun 19, 2012)

The 2002ish Mountainsmith Paragon was a great camera bag with a large duffel added to the bottom of it. I really wish they had kept this line going with a few updated features. Top access was perfect for the D70 I had, but it a little tight with a D200/D300.

Don't more photographers leave their camera strap on when storing their cameras? Bags never seem to take this into consideration.

0 upvotes
brudy
By brudy (Jun 19, 2012)

Agreed about carrying water, or at least the ability to attach a bottle holder or something. I'm not sure how so many manufacturers overlook something so basic.

0 upvotes
penguinman
By penguinman (Jun 19, 2012)

I like my 30L and my 22L for foreign travel. They are a little smaller and lighter than many other bags yet hold a good amount of equipment.

See if you can sign up for the Gura Gear web site as they sometimes send out $50 discounts.

They are incredible in backing up their bags. I bought the 22L early last fall. Then in March I got an email that they had discovered a "defect" that I had never encountered and they sent me a completely new bag paying postage for the new bag and the return of my old bag. Indeed, they sent the new bag by 2 day delivery.

3 upvotes
TEBnewyork
By TEBnewyork (Jun 19, 2012)

I had the 30L but currently use the 22L. The 22L fits all of my gear just fine since I don't have any really big long lenses. The 22L has a laptop compartment that is very important to me with carry on luggage restrictions.

I agree with your review.

1 upvote
mikeoregon
By mikeoregon (Jun 19, 2012)

Thanks, Carsten, hope you will keep looking and letting us know what you find. I hike and shoot in the mountains here in Oregon with a day pack carrying camera gear, food, a rain jacket, headlamp, etc. and I still haven't found a lightweight pack that can carry it all, plus a tripod.

0 upvotes
jvossphoto
By jvossphoto (Jun 19, 2012)

Hey Mike, I don't pack my tripod, I just extend one leg and use it as a walking stick, of course it's much better to have a light well built tripod. I've had a Bogen for 20yrs now, have had to repair it with J-B weld a couple of times but it still works great. It definitely beats the hell out of having to carry it on your back, plus if you need it quick you've got it right in your hands. One bit of advice, always use the same leg so you don't damage different legs.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Silat Shooter
By Silat Shooter (Jun 19, 2012)

I have two friends that have this backpack and they like it very much! Like others here, I need a backpack that can carry other personal items other than my photo gear when I'm out. Especially when hiking or traveling by plane, I need to have options to carry laptop, some clothing, toiletries and nutrition and other obscure items. Have yet to find one be-all solution.

1 upvote
marcal
By marcal (Jun 20, 2012)

I bought this backpack because it is the lightest of all and contains a 600 f4 with a camera body mounted, or a 800 5.6 with no body. Lightness is the size is important in European and international air travel. The dimensions are those required by the airlines, although some company, not just low cost, always finds a way to create difficulties when there are many passengers in flight. The cost is very high, but for me it was the only solution. It has no space for the computer. In my case, after a few days of safari in Tanzania, the zips have had major problems to flow, certainly for the dust that came in the car during transfers. I had to endure this for the rest of the trip, because it is not clean enough. Once back home I washed, but it was not enough. I had to put the wax and now flowing well.

Sorry for the translation with google translator

1 upvote
OvinceZ
By OvinceZ (Jun 20, 2012)

I have the 30L Kiboko. I just tried putting my Benro carbon fibre flat Travel Tripod in and it is a perfect fit. Not with the ball head, of course. This tripod is quite light. I have the largest travel tripod but there is also one that is a bit shorter and slightly lighter. So the Kiboko will accommodate a big tripod.

1 upvote
Total comments: 112