Cine System Tripod Dolly and Mount Review

Cinetics Cine System
$450  http://store.cinetics.com/cine-system/

Not too long ago, we posted an article featuring the top Kickstarter projects in the photography realm. Though many of the inventions were or are still seeking crowd-funded financial backing, a few made it into the limelight. Justin Jensen's CineSkates camera dolly system was one of them, garnering enough interest and capital to send the product to major retailers. Shortly after our Kickstarter article was published, Justin contacted me about reviewing his Cine System, which includes the CineSkates dolly and CineSquid suction cup mounts. I was keen to see how it performed, and in this review I'll be taking you through the system and how it works.

CineSkates

The Cine System begins with the CineSkates dolly system, designed for seamless panning of DSLRs, Camcorders and smartphones. CineSkates is composed of a Joby Gorillapod Focus tripod with Ballhead X head mounted to three rugged plastic cups on top of what are basically skateboard wheels, aptly named CineSkates. Jensen went with Bones metal bearings, which are some of the highest quality bearings on the market. I know this because I have experimented with several inline skate bearings over the years and ended up relying on Bones for the smoothest, fastest and most durable ride.

The skateboard wheels actually feature ruler marks for rotating the system consistently during time-lapse photography. Also included with the CineSkates is the SkatePlate, which is a triangular base for the Gorillapod to sit atop to raise the height of the camera and provide added stability. The Ballhead X can also be connected to the base of the SkatePlate for an ultra low point of view, foregoing the use of the tripod entirely. The CineSkates system can support up to 2.3kg (5 lbs.).

The recommended setup of the CineSkates dolly system using the smartphone adapter to mount an iPhone 5. The SkatePlate adds rigidity and height to the CineSkates system, and is adjustable.

I tested the CineSkates system with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and 24-105mm lens on a variety of surfaces. Each individual wheel has the capability of spinning a full 360-degree revolution. This way, all three wheels can be setup for moving the tripod in a curve (arcing), panning horizontally and moving toward or away from a subject rather quickly (tracking). In order to configure a particular camera path with the CineSkates system, I had to rotate the wheels accordingly. For instance, to get an even horizontal pan, I had to align all three wheels parallel to one another. For arcing shots, I had to angle the front two wheels and leave the rear wheel perpendicular to the center axis. Rotating all three wheels in relation to the center axis allowed for spinning shots around a fixed fulcrum. One caveat I found with the CineSkates system is that the wheels must be angled correctly when using the setup without the SkatePlate, or you'll lose that fluid motion. 

Once I was able to dial in the CineSkates system, I was pleasantly surprised. On smooth floor surfaces such as finished concrete or laminate flooring, I was able to pan seamlessly without any compromising shake. Because the wheels are small, I found that I had to adequately clean the floor surface before using the CineSkates system. The reason is that even the smallest particle of dirt can cause a bump in the road. So, on a well cleaned, smooth surface, the CineSkates system performed exceptionally, thanks to the rigidity of the system and buttery smoothness of the Bones bearings. Tight, intimate shots are ideal with the CineSkates system, as well as capturing home interiors or outdoor landscapes by setting up on a counter top or bench. My favorite shots were fast zooms, achieved by thrusting the system forward and landing a few inches away from the subject. With a wide-angle lens, the effect was even more exciting. The versatility of such a small and affordable dolly system will be hugely attractive to budget filmmakers who don't have the funds or space to hire a Hollywood-grade rig.

The CineSkates system relies on high quality Bones bearings for a smooth ride.

Here's the obvious con of the CineSkates system. Rough surfaces, such as weathered asphalt, gravel and any textured floor are out of the question. This is because of the size of the system's skateboard wheels. The wheels are very small, and this amplifies any small bumps into problematic jolts and jittering in the final footage. Because of this, the CineSkates system is really only destined for specialty shots, but with a little creativity, that potential can be stretched. For instance, if a shot needs to be made way out in the woods, a small platform could be made with a smooth surface on top. Yes, it will add to the transportation load, but it shows that there are ways to increase the versatility of the CineSkates system. Just don't expect to obtain the sort of results you'll get from a professional dolly system with inflatable tires and a motor.

Cinesquid

The other half of the Cine System is composed of the CineSquid mounts. These are three high quality suction cups that attach to the ends of the Gorillapod legs for securing the rig on glass surfaces. The obvious advantage of the CineSquid system is the ability to mount to vehicle windows and shoot panning landscapes or point-of-view traveling shots. This is a huge bonus, and a must for shooters who want the added versatility. What I liked most about the CineSquid system was that I could slap the setup onto any medium sized or larger window and orient the camera at unique angles. This was particularly useful for getting bird's eye view shots in a room and other unconventional angles.

Here's the CineSquid system mounted on a window. After several hours, this rig was still firmly planted. Need some landscape b-roll? The CineSquid system will mount to your vehicle and stay put.

I was almost more impressed with the CineSquid system than I was with the CineSkates setup. In order to test the rig, I suctioned my Canon EOS 5D Mark III to a large window in my house and let it sit for three hours. When the time was up, I grabbed each leg of the tripod and yanked firmly. All three suction cups were still firmly affixed to the window, as the glass window caved slightly with each tug. I then suctioned the setup to the windshield and driver's side window of my truck and took a drive. Some of the roads I drove on were asphalt, some were dirt, some were gravel. Of course, being in New England, potholes are a common occurrence, so I had to deal with some relatively rugged terrain at times.

For the most part, the footage was impressively smooth and jitter-free, but of course there are a myriad of variables. For one, I have a truck with generous suspension - I would probably have seen very different results in a car designed for city driving. In addition, I deliberately kept my driving smooth and controlled, and my speed was always kept under the limit on slow back roads. I recommend traveling slower anyway, for footage can always be sped up in post, and at wide angles, footage always looks like it was filmed at faster speeds than it was. 

The main point of the test - the CineSquid's ability to remain attached to my vehicle - was achieved. I will admit, I was quite concerned connecting a $4,000 camera system to the windshield of my truck, but fretted no more when I pulled over and yanked on the suction cups, to find they were just as firmly attached as when I first mounted them. I also received a few priceless looks from rubberneckers, I guess because seen from a distance, the CineSquid system looks rather like a giant spider attacking the vehicle. After spending quality time with the CineSquid system, I was very impressed and I'm pretty confident that it would be a valuable addition to any budget filmmaker's tool belt.

Test Video (zooming, panning, rotating, and driving with CineSquid)

Summing Up

Throughout my tests with the Cine System, it became apparent that Mr. Jensen has poured a hefty amount of time and research into its creation. While the system may seem simple - a trio of skateboard wheels and suction cups - they can be used in numerous environments and shooting locations. The CineSkates and CineSquid systems compliment each other nicely, and users will find which scenarios fit which system the best over time. Most importantly, this stuff is solid and well-made. Suction cups remained firmly planted, wheels glided seamlessly across smooth surfaces, and the Gorillapod Focus tripod with Ballhead X coped easily with the weight of my 5D Mark III. While the Cine System may not attract big Hollywood cinematographers, it will certainly find ample space in the budget filmmaker and TV producer genre.

What we like: Numerous uses, budget friendly for low cost productions, structurally sound, invites creativity without massive cost

What we don't like: Surfaces must be perfectly smooth for CineSkates to work optimally, limiting usefulness outdoors, and wheels must be carefully aligned for smooth panning when Skateplate is not used


Mike Perlman is a freelance photographer and writer, based in Bar Harbor, Maine. After a spell reviewing camcorders at Camcorderinfo.com, Mike moved to infoSync World as the Senior Photography Editor, before taking up a role at TechnoBuffalo.com as the head of the Photography department. These days, Mike runs his own photography business and contributes to dpreview between shoots.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 70
riknash
By riknash (5 months ago)

Nice article and decent review with sample video examples. Next time leave the wind noise crumpling the diaphragm of the built-in microphone out. That was harsh.

The review showed some of the strengths and weaknesses of the product but left me wondering how well the product(s) would stand up in more extreme environments such as would the suction cups maintain their hold at temperatures below freezing? Does the elasticity of the wheels change in colder temperatures along with the wheel to surface grip, causing a bumpy slippery ride?

0 upvotes
Douglas69
By Douglas69 (7 months ago)

The interesting part of these 'remarkable' new wheels and cups is that someone had already invented it 30 years ago. Now by adding a few over tight plastic ball sockets and suction cups this is the big rave on a wonderful new product.

I'm all for invention but FCS, let's invent something new for a change. The whole industry is overcrowded with too many people trying to sell too many re-inventions to too few people.

Sorry folks but this is just more of the past fancied up as an odd ball looking gimmick. Anyone remember the first ball joint tripod head from Manfrotto?

In 1977 I bolted a Canon VHS camera onto the side of my Landrover and went into to bush with it. Footage is yuk now but at the time it was AOK for 640 x 480. Stick an iPhone on the same bracket now and it would be way more robust and just as light as this one. Back then the tripod and a bit of welding cost $45 and did exactly the same. Nothing new here.

0 upvotes
BeerIsSoAwesome
By BeerIsSoAwesome (9 months ago)

This is a very clever design, and the finish looks lovely. It certainly seems versatile for a do-it-all kit, however I can't help but think that the application seems *very* specialized.

The panning/zoom shots could be accomplished by bolting a ball-head to a cheap skateboard. It seems to me that the extra weight of the board, and maybe selecting one with larger-diameter wheels, might help smooth out the action.

Additionally, I attended PDN last year and saw dozens of DSLR suction mounts for automotive use, some of which seemed both very sturdy and *very* cheap.

What this does do very well is tabletop rotational panning, and the promised expandability of motorized wheels could be very useful for time-lapse. It seems like this is a very versatile kit that does a lot of things in a small package for a reasonable cost, but you might be able to get better results for each individual task with some DIY ingenuity.

0 upvotes
massimogori
By massimogori (Mar 13, 2013)

just realized that somebody already wrote what I had in mind with my comment. Sorry.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
silyn
By silyn (Mar 13, 2013)

I would never buy this especially @ $450. As mounted on a car (suction cups) nothing unusual however supported load of 5lb is not enough. I would not trust 5lb equipment to this mount.

As a dolly, based on sample video, it really sucks. The movement it produces (again, based on video) does not look good - it's a toy, and there is no smoothness, and it moves like a toy. There may be some uses for this thing, why not, but $450? There are better ways to invest such money into video equipment. Obviously my personal opinion.

1 upvote
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Mar 14, 2013)

If it "sucks", then you should probably invest a few grand in a professional system. That was the raw footage. Obviously, without audio and a little shake reduction in post, it will look fine for most applications. But if you are looking for a Spielberg production-quality rig, then be prepared to shell out big bucks. Again, I can't wrap my head around everyone crying over the price.

1 upvote
Douglas69
By Douglas69 (7 months ago)

Hey mike... What happened to shoot it right and forget the edit? If your footage needs post production to make up for the shortfall in a $450 product, you seriously have to add the software to reach the true cost of the product, do you not?

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Mar 12, 2013)

I'm having a difficult time figuring out what all the hullabaloo is about the price. The Gorillapod Focus/Ballhead X combo alone is $150, and most of you are saying that the entire kit--wheels, SkatePlate, high-quality suction cups, carry bags, smartphone tripod attachment--should be around $150 with the tripod combo. I honestly think this is priced well, especially after spending a few months reviewing the entire kit.

0 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Mar 18, 2013)

You are right about Gorillapod Focus/Ballhead X combo price. I am interested buying it at $350. $250 without suction cups would be better option for me.

0 upvotes
Aroart
By Aroart (Mar 11, 2013)

$150-$250. Maybe $450 no way.

1 upvote
Zen Miller
By Zen Miller (Mar 11, 2013)

Looking at the CineMoco and was wondering if the tracks can be setup at different slopes? Do the wheels have brakes so they can climb or descend?

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
steve ohlhaber
By steve ohlhaber (Mar 10, 2013)

I like the $19.99 skate you can buy that at least does all the rolling stuff the same way. Add a ball head and voila

4 upvotes
Chet Meyerson
By Chet Meyerson (Mar 10, 2013)

The price is entirely too high for the results shown in the video. JMHO

8 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Mar 10, 2013)

Very good approach to improve taking videos. The matter with the wheels needs better engineering: dampening and different materials. Can be solved.

The entry price is too high. May be two versions (low entry basic, and premium) will be better. And for those with the price: You pay for the idea, the implementation, and not the material.

Excellent initiative with the potential to grow.

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 10, 2013)

The review is TOO LONG.... and the price of the thing is WAY TOO HIGH.

2 upvotes
chiumeister
By chiumeister (Mar 10, 2013)

You must be joking.

4 upvotes
KHemmelman
By KHemmelman (Mar 10, 2013)

I find this entire product/kit intriguing and enjoyed the review. But I have to say the price is just simply way too high for me. It's not something I'd use very much and could never justify spending that amount of money for so little use. The price would be better suited at about half at around $225.

0 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 11, 2013)

Thank you! Maybe our mini system would be interesting to you? http://store.cinetics.com/mini-system/

0 upvotes
gusitar
By gusitar (Mar 10, 2013)

Sort of surprised to see such a remarkable amount of quibbling (with a hint of flaming) over the price, well before any economy-of-scale has had time to occur. For the amount of variables and included options, with hardware, kit came in a bit under my imagined calculator. My only concern is the quality of transport & containment gear-bags - comfort, protection and 'staying-power' etc. Yes, gear-bags and condoms . . . ease of use, not tearing and keeping the threads & gear clean.

Nice review (I need to go put on my zoom-suit and take a jog around the track) and congrats & good luck to the thread-hovering-manufacturer Cinetics for bringing the product to shelf.

Appears to be a great product IMHO - g

2 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Mar 11, 2013)

So many time folks here complaint about manufacturers who do not listen to what photographers want. Now we have here a manufacturer who actually cares and engages in discussions with photographers about the gear design and you label him "Thread-hovering-manufacturer". Not helping.

2 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 11, 2013)

No, worries. I actually take thread-hovering-manufacturer to be a compliment :) Thanks for sticking up for us though, Hubert!

@gusitar, thanks for the support and for pointing out the importance of gear bags. We put a lot of effort into our product bags, and it seems we do not display them well in the Cine System listing. We'll work on that.

0 upvotes
gusitar
By gusitar (Mar 11, 2013)

Cinetics - It was a compliment and my mention of parenthetic 'hint of flaming' preceding was meant to set a friendly stage - thanks for interpreting as such. Much appreciated ;-)

Hubert - I'll make an appointment with my dentist soon to get that tooth replaced so my tongue does not spend so much time in my cheek - and, happy to provide a platform for a statement about 'manufacturer engagement', an important facet of product delivery. Kudos - g

0 upvotes
Mr Mitch
By Mr Mitch (Mar 9, 2013)

Oh you poor reviewer, your knowledge of cinema terms is woeful.

There are no examples of zooms are there ?

Tracking in and out, yes, zooming no.

Basic stuff.

1 upvote
philinnz
By philinnz (Mar 9, 2013)

Good on You! a lot of thought has gone into this, and those that think it's expensive should try building the components yourself.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 9, 2013)

"Nice sound" on the Vimeo clip, ouch!!!!

I guess if you put little wheels on something, it moves. And if you put some small suction cups on it, it stays. Cinefanastic!

0 upvotes
prohidium
By prohidium (Mar 9, 2013)

I have not gone to the website to look, but if you already have a gorilla pod, can you just buy the rest of it separately? Such as the suction cup set or the wheel set?

0 upvotes
Steven Blackwood
By Steven Blackwood (Mar 10, 2013)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007F0IMK8/ref=s9_simh_gw_p421_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=1J1FP99MGYF0470J3TRF&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938811&pf_rd_i=507846

0 upvotes
Abhijith Kannankavil
By Abhijith Kannankavil (Mar 9, 2013)

thanks for the review, even though it may have no use for me.

But, let me say it anyway. All of this, including the comments by @cinetics make it sound as if a paid advertisement article. This is not what i expected out of dpreview.

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Mar 9, 2013)

Dpreview sold it soul to the devil call Amazon.

1 upvote
richsfusa
By richsfusa (Mar 9, 2013)

I don't think the intention of this article is to increase Amazon sales. It's to let us know of an interesting piece of equipment that is out there. The link for more information does not even go to Amazon.

4 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Mar 10, 2013)

There's no connection with dpreview and Cinetics (you'll notice they actually got my name wrong, in one of the earlier posts...), or with this review and amazon. We didn't even link to Amazon here.

It's just a good product, which one of our regular freelance contributors has reviewed for us. Sometimes, the world isn't as horrible as you seem to think. Just... sometimes.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Mar 9, 2013)

Yet another gizmo which attempts to turn perfectly good still cameras into all-singing-and-dancing video systems: which they will never be even with the addition of Heath Robinson attachments like this one. Yes, I know that people are using DSLRs for all sorts of commercial video shoots but I think that's because the obsession with ultra-shallow DOF - frequently used in completely absurd contexts, even news footage - has got out of hand. Buy a video camera. Save up for a fluid-head tripod. When you need a dolly system, hire one. To anyone who is prepared to stick a few grand's worth of electronics and optics on the windscreen of a moving vehicle - repeatedly - best of luck. You'll need it, even if it works OK the first, second or third time out.

0 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

The line between still and video cameras is fading. Embrace it ;) Our CineSquid suction cups have been used many many times and they continue to hold up strongly and reliably. We've had them on the outside of a sports car at high speed and even on the outside of a plane. Thank you for your feedback!

2 upvotes
StayClassy
By StayClassy (Mar 9, 2013)

I've used my A99 in ways most Go-Pro's would shudder at.

Once you ensure that a suction mount is on good, you'd most likely break the window before the suction cup comes loose.

You sound like you're terrified of the future, where people can get a SLT and shoot pro-level video that 99.9% of people think was shot with a cinema camera.

0 upvotes
SMSab
By SMSab (Mar 9, 2013)

Ok for $450 its a pure hardcore RIP-OFF, the most reasonable price tag should be not more then $200 along with all the additional stuff.

4 upvotes
sodacan
By sodacan (Mar 9, 2013)

Indeed, a bit of a shock really. While browsing through the review I thought I was looking at something that's in the 50 coin range locally and around 30 online. i.e. an impulse buy that's not a great loss if one only ends up using it once or twice.

Won't bother reading the review now. D'oh.

0 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Thanks for the feedback. We use high quality components in our system that result in the price. For example, the GorillaPod Focus tripod and Ballhead X are $150 alone. We also use precision bearings, wheels and other hardware. Good news though... we offer a lower cost system - http://store.cinetics.com/mini-system/ Thanks again!
Justin Jensen
Product Designer, Cinetics

0 upvotes
abolit66
By abolit66 (Mar 9, 2013)

good stuff but not for this price tag(IMHO)

2 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Thank you! FYI we offer a lower cost system also - http://store.cinetics.com/mini-system/

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Mar 9, 2013)

$450? That is too much for a mini tripod dolly. Just think for that price I could get a decent camera gib.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Thanks for your feedback! Our Cine System is comprised of high quality components... precision wheels and bearings, strong suction cups, and the top of the line aluminum GorillaPod Focus tripod and Joby's Arca-style Ballhead X which retail for $150 on their own. We offer many lower priced options at store.cinetics.com Thanks!

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Mar 9, 2013)

For what it is it is not worth $450. Maybe look at sourcing cheaper alternative parts for manufacturing.

2 upvotes
JohnMatrix
By JohnMatrix (Mar 9, 2013)

Is there that much demand for dolly footage taken 1ft off the ground?

4 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Sure :) Then add tables, counters, plywood, plexiglass, windows... CineSkates users have been extremely creative finding suitable surfaces. You can check out some of their work here - http://cinetics.com/featured/
Thanks!
Justin
Product Designer, Cinetics

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Mar 9, 2013)

Probably up womens skirt :)

2 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Mar 9, 2013)

To those who complaint the cost and refer to items made in China:
I live in China and it just so happened I have bought this week the best quality gorilla pod available in China. It cost me 3 USD. I love it for the price and just bought another one. But it just can hold my NEX-5 with a small lens attached to it. A Canon 5D with the popular f/2.8 zoom would be a no go. The tripod screw is also not fixed, so it is easy to loose it. As for suction cups. The best I found were 0.5 USD, but they fall of the window after 10 minutes. Saving money to drop your camera is very expensive. Getting the necessary quality manufactured here in China will require factories with good quality management, which will not take you as a customer if you do less than say 3000 pcs every month minimum. I doubt anyone can sell that much at this point in time, even if the kit were 99 USD. In short: I believe this product is great value today, 5 years later will be a different story.

0 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Hi Hubert, thanks for the feedback. You most likely did not by the best quality GorillaPod for $3. You either got an amazing deal or it is not a genuine Joby GorillaPod. Our Cine System uses the aluminum-jointed GorillaPod Focus - http://joby.com/gorillapod/focus/
Thanks again,
Justin
Product Designer, Cinetics

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Mar 11, 2013)

Hi Justin,
Thanks for your reply. I thought by listing its flaws of the "Chinese" Version of the Gorilla Pod it is apparent that it is a local made tripod which is very similar in style to yours but can't get the job done for pro work. If you shoot to make money such small nuisances such as that the tripod mount screw is not secured and will be lost if no camera is mounted is unacceptable in a professional production environment. This is the point I tried to bring across to those who criticized your pricing, that today you can not have both: Your original design and quality good enough for commercial work and China pricing. My apologies if this was not clear in my first attempt. I assumed Gorilla Pod is a descriptive name for this style of tripod. Let us know if Gorilla Pod is your trademark or even patented design. In case you are curious, for 3 USD here they were cheap and strong enough for me to mod them into very useful and versatile web cam holders. :-)

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Mar 11, 2013)

@ Justin, ( continuing)
Compliments to your Design and execution in production.

0 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 11, 2013)

Thank you, Hubert. I understand now! Thank you for the explanation and for your support. GorillaPod is a trademark and patented product from Joby Inc, a company that we partner with :)

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Mar 9, 2013)

Good review to deliver the concept with great illustrative shots and demo video. However, having shot panning and driving I had to deal with vibration in the shot. No amount of careful shooting was doing away with it and it was making the footage useless. I suggest information on how to remove vibration from the footage is related and should be given in the Article. A year ago I only found Adobe AfterEffects to have this function which would more than double the investment into this dolly system. Now it seems to be embedded in the latest Adobe Premiere CS 6which I will give a try. If the author or anybody have thoughts on this it is very appreciated.

0 upvotes
l_d_allan
By l_d_allan (Mar 9, 2013)

I'm fuzzy on just how it moves. It doesn't seem like the wheels are motorized, but perhaps they are. Is it pushed along, and follows a path based on the direction the wheels are pointed?

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Mar 9, 2013)

pushed.

1 upvote
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

You got it... it follows a path based on the direction you position the wheels. We also offer a motorized dolly... http://store.cinetics.com/cinemoco-system/
Thanks!!

0 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Mar 9, 2013)

Thanks for the review and real life samples :-)

The DSLR video market is only a few years old, if it really will grow depends on the accessory market as well. Prices came down already a lot and there will be some new producers this year as well (China)

I'll try to print myself a specific Cine system (3D printing) at the end of the year.

1 upvote
Digitall
By Digitall (Mar 8, 2013)

For Dolly, I prefer something more like Konova Skate Dolly or similar from other brand. More stable, lower e less susceptible to vibration, and easier leveling with only one Ball-Head. Avoiding also a concern in leveling Gorillapod legs.
For Suction Cups, there are many on the market at friendly prices, like FilmTools, Delkin, Manfrotto, Matthews or others, depending on the needs and equipment weight. I have a white label Dolly Skate that is similar to some known brands and it costs 3 times less with the same specifications.

2 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Thanks for the feedback. Our system is built to by modular - the components snap together to enable different uses. It is also extremely portable... much more than a rail/track based slider. And, the redundancy of the CineSquid makes for a strong mount. Also, CineSkates have a unique marking system for precision movements, including timelapse and stop motion photography. There are many features that differentiate our products from the ones you mentioned :) Hope that helps! Thank you!!

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Mar 11, 2013)

@ Justin,
Thanks for pointing out the use of the markings on the rollers. I was wondering about that ...

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Mar 8, 2013)

The reviewer wrote: "Surfaces must be perfectly smooth for CineSkates to work optimally, limiting usefulness outdoors".

Isn't that true for all dollies and therefore not a deficiency of the product itself?

He also writes: "I'm pretty confident that it would be a valuable addition to any budget filmmaker's tool belt."

I suppose "budget" is the operative word. Clearly the DIY or shoe-string budget filmaker is not going to find a $450 car-mount / dolly a particularly attractive solution. But specialized video gear is certainly not cheap, so the price doesn't seem completely unreasonable especially if it adds polish to your productions.

Good job, thanks.

2 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Thanks for the feedback! Your thoughts are quite logical :)

0 upvotes
huyzer
By huyzer (Mar 9, 2013)

For now, I can only afford a skateboard and a pillow. :D lol

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Mar 8, 2013)

Good review, nicely shot video, but $450 for so few parts ... well ...

1 upvote
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Thanks for the feedback, Kim. Please consider that there are five products in this system... we build CineSkates, SkatePlate and CineSquid with the highest quality components and extreme attention to detail. For example, CineSkates have markings on the wheels that enable you to make precise moves for tracking timelapse shots. Joby's professional GorillaPod Focus and Ballhead X are built from machined aluminum and retail for $150 alone. Thanks again!
Justin
Product Designer, Cinetics

1 upvote
Josh SZ
By Josh SZ (Mar 8, 2013)

Looks like a very practical tool. Like it. But for $450?

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Mar 8, 2013)

That's the complete kit - individual components are available for less.

2 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 9, 2013)

Brandon is right... we offer the components individually and we have a full range of products at lower price points :)

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Mar 10, 2013)

Brandon...?

3 upvotes
Cinetics
By Cinetics (Mar 11, 2013)

Barney, very sorry about that. I'm not sure where Brandon came from, hah. We're very excited that you guys reviewed our gear. It's incredibly cool to see our products featured on such a highly respected site. Keep up the excellent work! - Justin

0 upvotes
Matti Jarventausta
By Matti Jarventausta (Mar 12, 2013)

This is true budget conscious dolly - add smallish ballhead and you are good to go:

http://www.digitaltoyshop.co.uk/Sevenoak_Skater_Dolly_SK-DW04_t2858_7079

0 upvotes
alatchin
By alatchin (Mar 8, 2013)

Makes me want one, good review!

1 upvote
Total comments: 70